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MASS. 




LINCOLN 

MASSACHUSETTS 

k'nco/n p 

ilnco; 



f C / 



1966 ANNUAL REPORT 




Town Hall 



tf 



Art work in 1966 Town Report 
courtesy of Ronald C. Davis. 

Report briefs in Report 
courtesy of Sareen Gerson and 
L. Bruce Long. 



Contents 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 

REPORT BRIEFS 1 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 9 

Officers and Committees 15 

Town Clerk 24 

FINANCE 

Treasurer 48 

Town Accountant 56 

Collector of Taxes 82 

Board of Assessors 84 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Departments 87 

Civil Defense 93 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 95 

Walden Guidance Association 99 

Inspector of Animals 101 

Board of Public Welfare 101 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 103 

Board of Appeals 106 
Inspectors of Building, Wiring & 

Plumbing 110 

Cemetery Commissioners 111 

Department of Public Works 111 

Water Department 116 

School . Building Needs Committee 119 

Conservation Commission 121 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 123 



Page 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS (Cont.) 

Historical Park Advisory Commission 124 

Town Historian 127 

LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Library Trustees 129 

Recreation Committee 134 

Bemis Fund Trustees 142 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park 143 

Elementary Schools 152 

Regional High School 194 

Regional Agreement Study Committee 223 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 232 

Valuation List 238 

Trust Funds 268 



REPORT 

of the 

Officers and Committees 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 1966 




Lincoln, Massachusetts 



Town Calendar 



SELECTMEN 
-SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

PLANNING BOARD 

Population: 
Town Area: 
1966 Tax Rate: 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



ANNUAL ELECTION FOR 
TOWN OFFICERS 

Qualifications for 
Registration : 



Town Offices: 



Every Monday of each month, 8:00 
p.m., Town Hall, 259-8850. 

First Monday of each month, 8:00 
p.m., Superintendent's Office, 
259-9400. 

For appointments call Town Hall, 
259-8850. 

Meetings by appointment. 

Meetings by appointment; call Dr. 
Gordon Donaldson, 259-8192. 

Third Thursday of each month; call 
Town Hall, 259-8850. 

Second Monday of each month, 8:00 
p.m., Town Hall, 259-8850. 

— 4,463 (1965 Census) 
14.56 square miles. 

— $35 per $1,000 valuation. 

First Monday in March after the 
fifteenth - March 20, 1967. 

Saturday following Town Meeting - 

— March 25, 1967. 

Twelve months continuous residence 

— in the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts prior to March 20, 1967 and 
six months continuous residence in 
the Town of Lincoln prior to March 
20, 1967. 

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed on Satur- 
days. 



REPORT BRIEFS 

Summaries of the more pertinent reports. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

"REASONABLE, MINIMAL PLANNING" for Civil Defense is 
recommended by the Lincoln Selectmen, who also comment on 
road planning, public works, public safety, and the pro- 
posed "temporary" town dump . . . 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

DRILL SESSIONS for Lincoln's call firemen, Fire Train- 
ing Academy courses for the two regular firefighters, and 
a continuous program for testing fire department equipment 
are all increasing efficiency here . . . There were 247 
fire calls during the year . . . 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

214 DRIVERS were reported to the State Registry for 
traffic violations' in 1966 ... 130 were taken to court 
. . . Police training and college-level courses in Crim- 
inal Law are stepping up police department "know-how" . . 
and the Fire-Police Station has a new weathervane .... 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

A STEADY BLAST of the town whistle, for three to five 
minutes, is the new "local disaster" alert signal. Three 
buildings in Lincoln will be marked and stocked as public 
shelters this year, the CD director reports .... 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

LIKE MONEY IN THE BANK — Pooling the manpower and 
equipment resources of highway, parks, cemetery, and water 
divisions is keeping Public Works Administrator Cande on 
the go, and town expenditures low. Four new parking lots 
were built, and four town roads improved in ' 66 






PLANNING BOARD 

GREEN FIELDS AND WILD SWAMPS — "A fine first step", 
the planners say, of the town meeting approval of "By '70 
Plan" land purchases. Now they're looking for a perman- 
ent way to take care of the "rubbish explosion" — perhaps 
a regional incinerator? 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

135,713,400 GALLONS pumped in 1966 set a record . . , 
Use of the new Tower Road town well began on August 20, 
and the Water Commissioners tell how they managed to end 
the year with a $29,720 surplus .... 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

The Commission has gained commendable momentum in im- 
plementation of the By-70 Plan. The Commission's pro- 
posal to acquire several parcels of land was approved at 
the March and November Town Meetings and applications for 
State and Federal assistance were filed. Further pro- 
posals are being prepared for presentation to future Town 
Meetings .... 



LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Working closely with the Conservation Commission, a 
system of trails marked for walking and riding has been 
developed to a total length of nearly 12 miles . . . 



MINUTE MAN NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 

The Park is limited to 750 acres, of which 417 acres 
have already been acquired through 127 transactions and 
conveyances. Of this total, 212 acres in Lincoln have 
been acquired through 72 transactions. Of the total 
amount of $3,800,000 spent on land acquisition to date, 
$2,200,000 has been spent in Lincoln . . . 

During the past year, the Buttrick Dairy, the Giurleo 
greenhouses, the Primak properties, and the historic Hart- 



well Tavern were, among significant properties, acquired 
in Lincoln . . . 

The building on North Great Road originally erected 
for the North Lincoln District School continued to serve 
as the temporary headquarters for the park project. Over 
3000 persons each month visited this headquarters for in- 
formation and to see the exhibits there during the months 
of June through September . . . 

Archeological field work of major importance was 
carried on at the site of the former Daniel Brown House on 
Nelson Road. Finds included a number of coins - includ- 
ing a 1629 French coin - two musketballs, a musket flint, 
an old spur, and many fragments of chinaware, pottery and 
clay pipes, no later than 1750. . . . 

The Park Advisory Commission presented a statement 
at the public hearing held by the DPW in Concord on June 8 
in favor of the "Northerly Alternate" for the proposed re- 
location of Route 2. . . 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

"OH, FOR A BOOKE — and a shady nooke, either indoore 
or out, With the greene leaves whispering overhead, or the 
street sounds all about; Where I can reade, all at my 
ease, bothrof the new and the older For a jollie goode 
booke, whereon to looke, is better to me than golde ..." 

That's an Old English song. New England translation: 
circulation at the Lincoln Public Library, more than twice 
the state average, reached a total of 70,782 adult and 
juvenile books, magazines, and records in 1966 .... 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Another active year in a broad spectrum of programs J 
Approximately 250 children attended ski school at DeNor- 
mandie's Hill ... Over 100 participated in the summer 
program of tennis instruction. . . . Low water at Walden 
Pond caused cancellation of the swimming program, and the 
Aquatics Study is working on the problem of a better faci- 
lity. Research and tests were conducted on three poten- 



tial Lincoln sites for an earthen pond and the feasibility 
of a facility integrated into the school system is being 
explored .... 

Summer Playground 

This past year, 312 children were registered and en- 
joyed programs in athletics, arts, crafts, music, games, 
and special events. Activities voted most popular ranged 
from visits to the Esplanade Concert and Higgins Museum 
of Armor to bike hikes and being sprinkled by the Fire 
Department ' s fog spray .... 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 

ART SHOWS "on the hill" classes below, in the 

four new teaching studios that opened in October, when 
800 students registered, a record high . . . Appointed 
in 1966 was an Acquisition Committee, to help build the 
Museum's permanent collection . . . 



BEMIS FUND 

INNOVATION - - - "First-come, first-served" free 
tickets for Lincoln residents will be issued for Bemis 
Lectures that promise to draw overflow audiences . . . 



TOWN HISTORIAN 

A new storage unit at the Library provides interested 
citizens and serious researchers convenient access to 
material relating to Lincoln's history. Recently im- 
portant additions have been made and suitably preserved. 
Petitions of protest from Concord, Lexington and Weston 
over incorporation of Lincoln as a town are among these 
interesting acquisitions . . . 



LINCOLN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Superintendent of Schools 

"We believe that each child has the right to partici- 
pate in the joys and disappointments of becoming a human 



being who cares how he leads his life . . . (that) each 
human being has a responsibility to so live his life that 
he contributes but does not intrude upon the rights of 
others .... that each child's talents deserve our respect, 
and our maximum efforts of inspiration and encouragement 
for development ... we should make every effort to recog- 
nize and analyze individual differences in children's ex- 
periences, intellectual development, personal qualities, 
special aptitudes, abilities, and goals, and proceed to 
meet these differences with appropriate methods of in- 
struction. " (From "Philosophy and Objectives of Lincoln 
Public Schools") . 

The sabbatical leave policy of the School Committee 
has been put into effect with leaves by Dr. Barbara Ben- 
nett, Miss Barbara Morris and Superintendent Robert Fil- 
bin. Mr. Filbin is conducting educational research in 
the Institute of Administrative Research at Columbia Uni- 
versity, where he is a Paul Mort Fellow, completing the 
residence requirement for the doctorate degree. Mr. Fil- 
bin returns to Lincoln at least twice a month to meet 
with the School Committee, the staff, and the superinten- 
dents of the Sudbury Elementary and Lincoln-Sudbury Re- 
gional High Schools, and to attend to other school busi- 
ness. Mr. Drake, Administrative Assistant, is Acting 
Superintendent during Mr. Filbin 's absence . . . 

The year 1966 saw many changes on the American educa- 
tion scene. The Federal government, with billions of 
dollars to spend on education, exercised a wide degree of 
influence on American schools. The Lincoln schools, us- 
ing Federal Funds, were involved in projects aimed at im- 
proving writing and spelling at the junior high school 
level, supplementing materials for the school libraries, 
and a "Liberty Council" project aimed at providing a re- 
gional supplementary instructional center for Concord, 
Sudbury, Bedford, Framingham, Carlisle, Acton, Littleton, 
Maynard and Lincoln. Also using Federal Funds, a new 
primary school was completed at Hanscom Field, and a room 
at Brooks School was remodeled into an additional science 
room. .... 

Continued effort has been made to coordinate the pro- 
grams of the elementary schools and the Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional High School, including monthly meetings between 
superintendents and principals . . . 



New programs this year have included establishment of 
a Guidance Department for counseling services to children, 
parents, and teachers, as well as coordination of guidance 
and counseling services provided by nurses, speech thera- 
pists, and the remedial reading staff . . . 

The Lincoln Schools have been participating in the 
M.E.T.C.O. plan to bring children from economically de- 
prived homes in Boston to the suburbs for purposes of edu- 
cation^ Using funds made available by the Carnegie 
Foundation and the Stern Family Fund, ten children from 
Boston have been attending kindergarten at Hartwell School, 
According to the teaching staff, the children have adjust- 
ed to the daily ride back and forth from Boston and to the 
Lincoln school program . . . 

Hartwell School Principal 

As a further extension of non-grading, the first multi- 
aged team of six, seven and eight year olds, called Team 
W, rwas begun in September. Science and social studies 
are taught in multi-aged groupings or the children may be 
variously grouped for particular skills to be learned. 
Language arts and arithmetic groups are more or less homo- 
geneous, depending on the achievement level of the pupils. 
An evaluation of the multi-aged team will be made in the 
spring to determine the strengths and weaknesses of this 
organization . . . 

Smith School Principal 

As a result of an in-depth faculty study and discus- 
sion of the Harvard University Survey, the faculty of the 
Middle School took a first step at eliminating the age 
barriers between Teams and N. The new organization is 
based on the notion of continuous progress at each child's 
own ability and learning rate, so that age is less import- 
ant than achievement in determining placement in classes. 
The team-teaching approach continues, with regular meet- 
ings among teachers in a given team and with services of 
part-time consultants being provided. The faculty con- 
stantly considers ways of improving its approaches and is 
committed to refinement of the sophisticated plans needed 
for a program of individualized instruction . . . 



The non-graded approach will be evaluated this spring, 
but its acceptance by students, parents and teachers in- 
dicate its probable continuation in the future as a basic 
educational approach . . . 

Brooks School Principal 

"Study Skills" which started out as an alternative to 
French has become more fully defined as a subject and has 
been developing new techniques to improve verbal skills. 
Federal help has been applied to this program . . . 

A system of pupil advisors was instituted, each teach- 
er becoming the advisor to a small number of children . . 

A fifth major course is being considered which will 
probably expand the present French or Study Skills alter- 
native to include Latin, Personal Typing, and possibly 
Mechanical Drawing. Such an array would be offered on 
an elective-selective basis . . . 

Hanscom School Principal 

The Primary School is most proud of its new library 
and pupil resources program. A strong emphasis is being 
placed on audio-visual materials. The Middle School was 
reorganized this year as a multi-aged, non-graded group. 
The Upper School has been organized into a semi -multi-aged 
situation, with former "sixth and seventh graders" being 
grouped together in homerooms but attending academic 
classes by ability level groupings. All students attend 
special subject classes in multi-aged groups. . . 

Although the Viet Nam situation has prevented the 
school population from quite reaching the predicted esti- 
mate, additional facilities are still needed. For exam- 
ple, close cooperation between the Primary School and the 
Kindergarten has been made difficult by the location of 
the latter at Center School . . . 

School Nurse 

Malnutrition is not a problem in Lincoln schools, but 
every year there are a few children with overweight prob- 
lems, as disclosed by the weighing and measuring programs 
conducted with the assistance of the physical education 



instructors . . . 

The school-wide dental screening program referred 234 
children to family dentists for treatment. The annual 
vision and hearing testing disclosed 21 final hearing fail- 
ures and 54 vision failures. All new cases were dis- 
cussed with parents and referred for medical diagnosis and 
correction. The annual tuberculin testing of 6-year olds 
disclosed no positive reactors. . . . 

The health education program included showing of the 
movies to adolescent girls "You're a Young Lady Now" and 
"It's Wonderful Being a Girl", as well as movies for boys 
and girls on dental care and blood circulation. * . 

The after-school sports program for hockey, basketball, 
soccer, calisthenics, and baseball continues to be very 
popular. . . 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH 

NEW FACES AND NEW SPACES - - - Regional High added 26 
to faculty, 130 to student body, and a no^-quite-f inished 
building addition. Superintendent-Principal Ruliffson re- 
ports on the new work-experience program, school orchestra, 
guest-lecturer history course, and seven new sports that 
were added this year. Did you know that all language 
classes can now use the language labs twice a week? 




DeCordova Museum 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 
Russell L. Haden, Jr. 
Harold E. Lawson 



The Board of Selectmen represents the Town between 
Annual Town Meetings and carries out the general admin- 
istration of Town affairs. It performs various duties 
specifically defined by statute, joining the Town Boards 
to initiate and develop policies for Town consideration 
and action. 



Policies of the Town which guide the governing 
bodies are, like the British Constitution/ not published 
in any one place. Understandably, this creates some 
difficulties in communication. It is true that all 
Town policies result from actions of the Town and its 



Boards and are published from time to time in many places 
including the regular Annual Reports and special reports 
like the By '70 Plan. However, we appreciate how diffi- 
cult it is for those not actually participating in town 
government to understand and be alert to those policies 
which the Boards and committees follow consistently. 
The following is a general review of Selectmen's activi- 
ties. 

1. Public Safety . This Board is the one pri- 
marily concerned with and responsible for public safety. 
This involves ultimate responsibility for the Police De- 
partment, the Fire Department, and all services which af- 
fect the safety of the Town and its inhabitants. 

Planning of past years has resulted in a single 
administrator for the Fire and Police Departments. The 
coordination made possible by a single head, Leo J. Algeo, 
and the resulting efficiency devoid of departmental rival- 
ries, has brought about excellent results and leadership 
in this area. The Board appreciates the fine work car- 
ried on by the men in both departments. The Board also 
encourages the continuing efforts of both departments to 
increase training and knowledge in their particular areas 
and supports studies and conferences whenever possible. 

2. Civil Defense . This Board maintains that 
Civil Defense is worthy of support by the Town. Not 
only is it necessary for the Town to be able to provide 
for its inhabitants in the event of some local disaster 
such as hurricane, power failure caused by any number of 
circumstances, or similar local catastrophes, but we 
recommend that reasonable minimum planning should be done 
to prepare for a national or international disaster. We 
do not believe that Town Boards can act on the assumption 
that unsolved international problems will fade. While we 
recognize that minimal planning is not the ultimate ans- 
wer for any emergency, we do recommend that some planning 
and effort is a wiser policy for the Town than doing noth- 
ing. 

3. Long Range Planning . The Board supports the 
activities of the Planning Board and the Conservation 
Commission in continuing to plan and to implement their 
plans for the overall long-range stability and develop- 
ment of the Town. The Board feels it reasonable to ex- 

10 



pect that the basic purposes of the By '70 Plan can be 
accomplished by 1970. The Board also is convinced that 
accomplishment of these purposes will result in stabili- 
zing and developing in a constructive way the best inter- 
est of the Town with a minimum effect on Town finances. 

No recommendations are being presented to the 
Annual Town Meeting in 1967. The Board understands that 
the Conservation Commission and the Planning Board hope 
that the important suggested acquisitions can be worked 
out, negotiated and presented together to the Annual Town 
Meeting in 1968. 

4. Public Works . Carrying out plans mutually 
agreed upon by all concerned Boards well over a year ago, 
the Board appointed a Public Works Administrator, Frank 
Cande, who has been working for the Town since May 1, 
1966. Correlation of all outside work for the Town is 
now possible. Improvements in operation and efficiencies 
which result in savings are beginning to be apparent. The 
Board feels that the Town is gaining constructively in its 
ability to handle the work on roads, parks, water, and 
work in all areas. 

5. Personnel Administration . Developing poli- 
cies for changing conditions results in adaptation from 
year to year. The retirement of Bill Davis as Collector 
of Taxes and the appointment of Fred Taylor as Collector 
and Mrs. Paddock as Deputy has resulted in centralizing 
work at the Town Hall. This has resulted in some chang- 
ing of office space which should mean better working con- 
ditions and efficiencies. 

The office of Executive Secretary, evolving for 
three years, is becoming clearly defined in timely fash- 
ion. The experience of similar offices in neighboring 
Towns and the changes taking place in Lincoln make it 
feasible to increase the responsibilities of this office 
and the service provided by it. The Board is recommend- 
ing that further courses of study be made available when 
worthwhile to develop further know-how for coping with 
changing circumstances. The Board is also aware of and 
very appreciative of the long hours and dedication con- 
tributed by Warren Flint during the difficult period of 
personnel shortages prior to the appointment of Frank 
Cande. 



11 



6. Wage Board. The concept and administra- 
tion of the Wage Board is developing and becoming better 
defined. A Constitution for the continuing Wage Board 
is being discussed for adoption by the concerned Town 
Boards, and it should be possible to test carefully vari- 
ous concepts during 1967. 

7. Route 2. We join in recognizing the 
dislocations, the difficulties and the problems which are 
a part of the relocation of any major highway system and 
realize that many residents of the Town will suffer no 
matter where the proposed new Route 2 is finally located. 
The location of the proposed new Route 2 has been a mat- 
ter of great concern to Town Boards for at least 11 years, 
It has been and is Town policy, which has been published 
and enunciated many times, that the Town as a whole is 
better served if the location of the proposed new Route 

2 follows the southern boundary of the Minute Man Nation- 
al Park. Meetings with public officials and public 
hearings were held during the year, and it is anticipated 
that final decisions will be forthcoming soon. Once the 
location of Route 2 is fixed, the location and construct- 
ion of a fire station in North Lincoln, various zoning 
decisions, and other planning can go forward without de- 
lay. 

8. Dump . It is clear that State regu- 
lations will require the present dump location to be 
moved, and a sanitary fill dump to be operated by the 
Town. Negotiations are being carried out, and it is an- 
ticipated that this matter can be voted on at the annual 
Town Meeting. 

It should be noted that any presently proposed 
location is planned to be of a temporary nature, and it 
is anticipated that within five years it will be possible 
for this Town to join with other towns in some governmen- 
tal authority which will make possible a regional dump or 
incinerator. The Chairman of the Planning Board and the 
Executive Secretary have been meeting for over a year 
with groups who are striving for such a result. 

9. Highways . The Board believes firmly in 
the policy of maintaining minimal widths on Town streets, 
consistent with reasonable safety. However, the Board 
recognizes that it is not possible always to maintain any 

12 



particular status quo indefinitely. 

Route 126 has been rehabilitated from Route 117 
south to the Way land line. This project has been com- 
pleted with great care to the end that most existing 
trees and the existing atmosphere can be preserved. In 
fairness to the residents of the area and for the Town as 
a whole, the Board does feel that it should be realized 
that the time will come when Route 126 will be increasing 
in importance as a highway. For many years, this road 
has been considered to be one of the peripheral highways 
of the Town. No plan is or has been suggested or con- 
ceived that could substitute for Route 126 in handling 
the ever-increasing flow of traffic which seems bound to 
cause the ultimate reconstruction or relocation of that 
road within five to twelve years. 

Somewhat similar problems beset Lincoln Road, which 
brings heavy traffic to the center of the Town and past 
the ever-growing school complex. In an effort to in- 
crease safety, devoted and thoughtful individuals and com- 
mittees have worked for two years to evolve a bicycle 
path which will be responsive to the needs of safety and 
also to the desires of the area to maintain its appear- 
ance and beauty. We recommend to the Town thoughtful 
consideration and adoption of the proposed bicycle path 
which will be presented at the annual Town Meeting. 



OBITER DICTA 

The Board meets regularly with the Planning Board 
to share with it forward thinking in new areas. Early 
in the year both Boards joined in appointing a study com- 
mittee to consider and make recommendations for the estab- 
lishment of an historic district in the center of Town. 
Much work and consideration has gone on. It is expected 
that recommendations will be presented to the annual Town 
Meeting in 1968 after ample time has been afforded for 
full understanding and discourse. 

Similarly, both Boards have joined in appointing a 
study committee to consider the possibilities of moderate 
income housing for the Town. This involves a major 
study, and hopefully the Committee will be in a position 
to report by Annual Town Meeting of 1968. 

13 



During 1966 and at the end of the Town Meeting in 
March of 1967, the following, who have served the Town 
faithfully and well, are retiring: 

On October 1st, 1966, Bill Davis, who has served 
the Town as Collector of Taxes for 30 years retired. No 
words can express the warmth the Town has for Bill, and 
its appreciation for his long years of friendly, cheerful 
service. Happily, Bill is willing to remain in service 
as Town Clerk, to carry on his usefulness and continuing 
contact with the people of the Town. 

Perry J. Culver was elected to the School Committee 
in an exciting election nine years ago and has been Chair- 
man of the Committee for the nine ensuing years. During 
his tenure, the schools, education, and the impact of ed- 
ucational needs of the Town on the Town have changed 
mightily. The Town, and in particular this generation 
of school children, will ever be in his debt. 

Similarly, nine years ago Russell P. Mahan was elect- 
ed Water Commissioner and has served with dedication as 
Chairman since 1960. Difficult problems caused by un- 
controllable factors such as the drought have been res- 
ponded to by him and the Commissioners, and the Town has 
been well served by his unruffled actions during exciting 
times. 

Warren Dwyer joined the Planning Board five years 
ago and has served consistently during this period of 
change, concentrated planning, and development. Few re- 
alize the long and frequent hours that are required for 
the outstanding work carried on by the Lincoln Planning 
Board. 

Finally, it seems appropriate to note another coming 
retirement. Elizabeth Causer has been Town Accountant 
and Clerk to the Selectmen for a long period of time which 
has seemed short because of her personal efficiency and 
cooperative understanding. During her tenure the Town, 
Town government, and the way of administering Town affairs 
has changed drastically. That the Town seems to be some- 
what like the Town of past years is due in 'no small meas- 
ure to her ability to understand, explain, and make diffi- 
cult adjustments seem relatively easy for many people. 
When she leaves us in September we shall miss her very 
much. 

14 



Kenneth W. Bergen 



William H. Davis 



MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



Term Expires 
1969 
1967 



SELECTMEN" AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 1969 

Harold E. Lawson 1968 

Russell L. Haden, Jr. 1967 



ASSESSORS 
Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 
John B. French 
Frank R. Stevens 



1969 
1968 
1967 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
William H. Davis (Resigned) 
Frederick B. Taylor (Appointed) 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Perry J. Culver, M. D. , Chairman 
Charles H. Stevens 
Margaret Marsh 



Russell P. Mahan, 
Alan McClennen 
Stuart Avery 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 
Chairman 



BOARD OF HEALTH 
Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D. , Chairman 
Pierre M. Dreyfus, M. D. 
Abigail Avery 

REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
James Jagger, Chairman 
Henry Morgan 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 



1967 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1968 
1967 
1969 



15 



Term Expires 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
Robert A. Spence, Chairman 
H. Arnold MacLean 
James DeNormandie 



1969 
1967 
1968 



PLANNING BOARD 
Chairman 



Robert L. Allen 

Warren R. Dwyer 

David L. Garrison 

Morton B. Braun 

R. Langdon Wales (Resigned) 

Richard C. Reece (Appointed) 



1971 
1967 
1968 
1969 

1967 



Harry Cook 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



1967 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 
Clement C. Sawtell 
Richard F. Schroeder 
William T. King 



1967 
1968 
1969 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 
Thomas Winship, Chairman 
Elizabeth Harney 
Paul Brooks 



1967 
1968 
1969 



TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 
Life Trustees 
Mo r ley M. John, Chairman 
Edwin M. Cole 
Alice G. Meriam (resigned) 
Martha DeNormandie (appointed) 

Margaret M. Marsh (resigned) 

(School Committee Appointee) 
John A. Carley (School Committee Appointee) 
Francis H. Gleason (Selectmen Appointee) 
Albert L. Fullerton (Elected by the Town) 



1967 
1967 
1969 
1968 



16 



Term Expires 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
A Directors 



Victor A. Lutnicki, President 
Paul W. Cook, Jr. (Resigned) 
Richard B. Bailey (Appointed) 
Francis Andrews 
Sumner Smith 



1968 

1967 
1969 
1970 



B Directors 
Hamilton R. James (Appointed by the Selectmen) 1969 
Janet Daniels 

(Appointed by the School Comm. ) 1968 
Stanley Heck 

(Appointed by the Library Trustees) 1967 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Warren F. Flint 



Executive Secretary 



Town Accountant and Clerk of Selectmen 
M. Elizabeth Causer 

Director of Public Welfare 
M. Elizabeth Causer 



1967 
1967 
1967 



Frank Cande 
Leo J. Algeo 



Director of Public Works 



Chief of Police 



Deputy Chief of Police 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 



1967 



1967 



1967 



Fire Chief 



Leo J. Algeo 



1967 



Constables 



Leo J. Algeo 
Lawrence P. Hallett 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr, 



1967 
1967 
1967 



17 



Term Expires . 



Police Officers 



Lawrence P. Hallett 
Michael McHugh 
Richard J. Hallett 
Charles E. Doyle 
Walter R. Carew 



Leo J. Algeo 
Lawrence P. Hallett 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr, 



Dog Officers 



Thomas W. Co an 



Leo J. Algeo 



Petroleum Inspector 
Forest Warden 



Building Inspector 
William M. Dean (Resigned) 
Ernest L. Johnson 



William M. Dean 



Wiring Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 



Daniel J. Murphy 

Director of Civil Defense 
Alanson H. Sturgis 

Assistant Directors of Civil Defense 
Eveleth R. Todd 
Ernest L. Johnson 



Delbar P. Keily 



John B. Tew 
Elmer H. Ziegler 



William B. Whalen 



Communications Officer 



Fence Viewers 



Veterans ' Agent 



1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 



1967 
1967 
1967 



1967 
1967 

1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 



1967 
1967 



1967 



1967 
1967 



1967 



18 



Term Expires 



Recreation Committee 



Mary Jane Butler 
Nancy Butler 
Donna Burt 
Charles E. Jennings 
Walter I. Keyes 
Mary Louise Long 
Rhoda Taschioglou 
Frederick P. Walkey 
Arlene Wirsig 



1967 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1967 
1969 
1969 
1967 
1967 



Special Police 



Robert H. Booth 
Joseph Bozak 
Floriy Campobasso 
Joseph Campobasso 
Vincenzo Cassela 
Edward C. Chisholm 
Claire Ciraso (traffic) 
Harry Cook 
John F. Cook 
Lorraine Dean (matron) 
William M. Dean 
James DeNormandie 
William R. Doherty 
Lloyd A. Douty 
Hazel Fedock (matron) 
Warren F. Flint 
John T. Gilbert 
Elliott V. Grabill 



Russell L. Haden, Jr. 
Ernest L. Johnson 
William T. King 
Harry B. Knowles, Jr. 
Harry B. Knowles, III 
Karl F. Lahnstein 
Harold E. Lawson 
Paul V. Moynihan 
Mary Murphy (matron) 
E. Donlan Rooney 
D. Everett Sherman, Jr, 
Carl Smith 
Sumner Smith 
Alanson H. Sturgis 
Anne Sturgis (traffic) 
Mary Gilbert (matron) 
Henry Warner 
William B. Whalen 



William B, 



Veterans 
Whalen 



Grave Officer 



1967 



Landscape Committee 
Ruth R. Rich 
Max Mason 

Elizabeth H. Doherty 
David Garrison 



1967 
1967 
1968 
1968 



Town Counsel 



John W. White (Resigned) 
William N. Swift (Appointed) 



Town Historian 



Ruth Wales 



1967 
1967 



19 



Term Expires 



Conservation Commission 
Robert Lemire, Chairman 
John Quincy Adams 
Paul Brooks 
James DeNormandie 
Edith M. Henderson 
Walter Van Dorn 
Hans Van Leer 



1968 
1967 
1969 
1967 
1969 
1969 
1968 



Board of Appeals 
William N. Swift, Chairman (Resigned) 
R. Langdon Wales, Chairman (Appointed) 
Alan McClennen 
Henry B. Hoover 
James Jagger 
Hans Van Leer 



1971 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 



Associate Members 



J. Lewis Cunningham 
John Pike 



1968 
1967 



Registrars of Voters 
D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 
Manley B. Boyce 
Roger Walen 
William H. Davis, ex officio 



1969 
1967 
1968 
1967 



Building Code Board of Appeals 

Lawrence B. Anderson 1969 

Stephen W. Herthel 1968 

Stanley D. Porter 1967 



Associate Member 



Walter E. Belanger 



1967 



National Historical Park Advisory Committee 
Katharine S. White (Appointee of Selectmen) 1967 
James DeNormandie (Appointee of Governor) 



Albert M. Avery 

James E. Duffy 

Margaret Flint 

Joyce Winship 

E. Donlan Rooney (ex officio 



Celebrations Committee 
III 



Historical Soc.) 



1968 
1968 
1969 
1969 
1967 



20 



Jury List, 1966 



Robert H. Baldwin 
John W. Barber 
William R. Barker 
John R. Barnard 
Edgar E. Barr 
Mary F. Belanger 
Robert G. Brownell 
George U. Browning, Jr, 
John R. Caswell 
Charles B. Comstock 
Robert P. Condit 
Bruce G. Daniels 
Ronald C. Davis 
Henry R. Davis, Jr. 
Jerome J. Duane 
Frederick T. Drew 
Anthony Faunce 
Roy S. Flewelling 
Thomas A. 0. Gross 
George G. Ha worth 
George C. Hibben 
Robert W. Jevon 
John D. Kling 
Max M. Mason, Jr. 
Richard W. Moss 
Mark L. Naiman 
Albert E. Nelson 
Charles L. Poulos 
William M. Rand, Jr. 
Richard C. Reece 
Arthur W. Rice, Jr. 
Roland W. Robbins 
Hugh J. Simms 
John P. Stevenson 
Edward S. Taylor 
Arthur H. Tetreault 
Thomas- D. Ward 
George Wells 
Niels 0. Young 



Todd Pond Road 

Old Cambridge Turnpike 

Old Bedford Road 

Old Concord Road 

Weston Road 

Cambridge Turnpike 

Stonehedge 

Conant Road 

Bedford Road 

Lincoln Road 

Concord Road 

Trapelo Road 

Concord Road 

Weston Road 

Conant Road 

Concord Road 

Sandy Pond Road 

Blueberry Lane 

Concord Road 

Giles Road 

Cambridge Turnpike 

Trapelo Road 

Farrar Road 

Winter Street 

Oak Knoll 

Weston Road 

Beaver Pond Road 

Deerhaven 

Lincoln Road 

Trapelo Road 

Sandy Pond Road 

Old Cambridge Turnpike 

Brooks Road 

Weston Road 

Tabor Hill Road 

Morningside Lane 

Old Concord Road 

Baker Bridge Road 

Winter Street 



21 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 
Assistant Treasurer 



Ann E. Paddock 



Term Expires 



1967 



APPOINTED BY THE TAX COLLECTOR 
Deputy Tax Collector 



Ann E. Paddock 



1967 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Community Nurse 
Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 



William H. Davis 



Philip Martin 



Burial Agent 



Inspector of Animals 



1967 
1967 
1967 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND MODERATOR 

Permanent Building Committee 
E. Karl Bastress 
John Pike 

Guilbert S. Winchell 
Winthrop Walker 
Alice McKennan 

Scholarship Fund Committee 
John D. Crawford, Chairman 
Charles W. Calkins, Jr. 
Annette E. Gras 
Robert L. Filbin, ex officio 



1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 



1967 
1968 
1969 



22 



Term Expires 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 



Finance Committee 
Leo A. Palmer, Chairman 
Arthur E. Thiessen 
Louis Farley 
J. David Hopkins 
Walter Salmon 



1967 
1968 
1968 
1969 
1969 



Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee 

Donald J. Natoli, Chairman 1967 

Henry W. Spencer 1968 

James E. Duffy, III 1969 



Bicycle Path Committee 
Susan Brooks 
David Donaldson 
Walter Van Dorn 
Robert L. Allen 
Warren R. Dwyer 
Morton B. Braun 
David L. Garrison 
Richard C. Reece 
Elliott V. Grabill 
Russell L. Haden, Jr. 
Harold E. Lawson 



1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 



23 



Town Clerk 

William H. Davis 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town 
events and activities and issues licenses and certifi- 
cates. His duties include recording the proceedings 
at Town Meetings and Elections, and notifying the Se- 
lectmen and other officers concerned of appropriations 
which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept 
at the Town Clerk's office. Persons wishing to be- 
come voters in the Town should communicate with the 
Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 21, 1966 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Charles Y. Wads- 
worth. The return of the Warrant was read and the in- 
vocation was given by the Rev. Morris Robinson. The 
Moderator then called attention to Article 1 (Election 
of Officers) , and, a quorum being present, the following 
business was transacted: 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any com- 
mittees, commissioners, trustees, and other officers re- 
quired by law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED : That Harry Cook be elected Measurer 
of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of 
Town officers, committees, commissioners and trustees. 

VOTED; That the reports of the town officers, 
commissioners, committees and trustees, as printed in 
the Town report, be accepted. 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation 
of the several elective officers of the Town and to de- 
termine whether any Department, Board or Committee shall 
be authorized to employ for additional compensation any 



24 



of its members, and to fix additional compensation of 
such members, 

VOTED ; That the salaries of the elected 
officials of the Town for the current year be fixed at 
the following amounts, respectively: 

Selectmen, each $ 100.00 

Treasurer 200.00 

Collector of Taxes 2,950.00 

Town Clerk 600.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Tree Warden 200.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for 
the necessary and expedient purposes of the Town or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town adopt as separate ap- 
propriations the listed recommendations in the Schedule 
attached to the Report of the Finance Committee for 1965, 
printed on pages 5-12, inclusive, of the Financial Sec- 
tion of the 1965 Town Report, except that the following 
final amounts shall be appropriated in substitution for 
the same numbered items in said Schedule: 

Item 
No. Title . 



304 Snow & Ice Removal & 

Control 
501 Schools (Administration) 
501a. Schools (Out of State Travel) 
504 Schools (Operation & Maint.) 
507 Schools (Acquisition of 

fixed assets) 

520 Libraries (Salaries) 

521 Libraries (Books & Records) 

522 Libraries (Expense) 

900 Unclassified (Middlesex Co. 

Pension Fund) 
956 Water (Interest on Bonds) 





Final 


Increase 


Amount 


$4,500 


$ 13,500 


175 


31,296 


375 


2,475 


2,000 


112,313 


20,864 


32,284 


-747 


24,412 


600 


8,100 


100 


935 


2,366 


17,955 


1,200 


4,570 



and that all items be raised by taxation except to the 
following extent: 

(a) as to items 15, 40, 320, 321, 521, 805, res- 

25 



pecting which said Schedule contains notations for the 
application of funds thereto from specific sources, 
funds from such sources shall be so applied; 

(b) as to items 501 .through 509, $31,204.90 shall 
be taken from P. L. 874, $8,154.78 from P. L. 864, 
$4,129.15 from Madison Fund, $1,005.85 from DeCordova 
Fund, and $49.87 from Grammar School Fund; 

(c) as to item 910, Reserve Fund, $10,000 shall be 
taken from Overlay Surplus; 

(d) Items 950 through 956, inclusive, shall be 
taken from Water Department receipts, except that in re- 
gard, to items 956 $62.40 shall be taken from Premium on 
Loan account, $92.08 from Interest on Loan account, and 
$13.89 from Interest on Loan, 1966, Account. 

Article 6 . To determine whether the Town will 
vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year begin- 
ning January 1, 1967, and to issue a note or notes there- 
for, payable within one year, and to .renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, 
in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

VOTED ; That the Town authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the finan- 
cial year beginning January 1, 1967, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to .renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year, in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, 
General Laws. 

Article 7. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 to be added to 
the Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote 
of the Town under Article 2 3 of the Annual Meeting on 
March 16th, 1959, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

VOTED ; That the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $20,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization 
Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959. 

Article 8. To determine whether -the Town will 
vote to appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 to be added to 
the Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote 
of the Town under Article 2 3 of the Annual Town Meeting 

26 



of March 16th, 1959, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $10,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization 
Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 2 3 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959. 

Article 9. . To determine whether the Town will 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee 
to continue its annual contract with the U. S. Commission- 
er of Education to operate the elementary school at L.G. 
Hanscom Field, Bedford, Mass. 

VOTED ; That the Town authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee to continue its annu- 
al contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to 
operate the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, 
Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Article 10. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $169.56 to pay 
the following unpaid 1965 bills or take any other action 
relative thereto : 

Recreation Department $133.56 

Cemetery Department 36.00 

VOTED t That the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $169.56 to pay the following unpaid 1965 bills: 
Recreation Department - $133.56; Cemetery Department - 
$36.00. 

Article 11. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
widening of Lincoln Road from approximately Sandy Pond 
Road to the Railroad Station Parking Area, including land 
damages and the construction of a way for bicycles, as 
shown on plan entitled "Lincoln Road Layout, Including 
Bicycle Path, Lincoln, Mass.", dated February 7, 1966, 
Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, Consulting Engineers, present- 
ly on file at the office of the Town Clerk; for said pur- 
pose to acquire the necessary easements or fees by emi- 
nent domain, purchase, or any other way, from private 
owners wherever shown on said plan; and to provide said 
sum from taxation and by borrowing under authority of 
Mass. General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 (5) ; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : To refer the matter of Article 11 to 
a committee consisting of the Planning Board, the Select- 

27 



men, and three citizens to be appointed forthwith by the 
Moderator, to consider and make recommendations and to 
report to the next Annual Town Meeting. 



The Annual Town Meeting was then adjourned temporari- 
ly in order that the voters might consider the article 
on the Warrant for a Special Town Meeting, duly called 
for this time. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
March 21, 1966 

Article 1. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to accept an Act to authorize the Town of Concord 
to acquire land within the Town of Lincoln for Reservoir 
purposes, and to curtail the rights of the Town of Con- 
cord to draw from the water of Sandy Pond for municipal 
supply purposes, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

VOTED : That the Town accept Chapter 35 of the 
Acts of 1966, authorizing the Town of Concord to acquire 
land within the Town of Lincoln for Reservoir purposes 
and to curtail the rights of the Town of Concord to draw 
from the water of Sandy Pond for municipal supply pur- 
poses. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 21, 1966 

Article 12. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $50,000.00, or 
any other sunw_to be added to the Conservation Fund es- 
tablished pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 
13 of the 1961 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That there be raised and appropriated 
the sum of $39,000.00 to be added to the Conservation 
Fund established pursuant to the Vote of the Town under 
Article 13 of the 1961 Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 13. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to acquire for conservation and recreation purposes, 
or any other purpose, by eminent domain, purchase, or in 
any other way, from Sandy Pond Trust, a certain parcel 
of land on the northeast side of the Concord Turnpike, 

28 



and adjoining land of the Town of Lincoln/ containing 
20 acres, more or less, and for such purposes to expend 
from monies in the Conservation Fund, established pur- 
suant to the vote of the Town under Article 13 of the 
1961 Annual Town Meeting, the sum of $9,000.00, or some 
other sum, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be, and they are, 
authorized and empowered in the name and on behalf of 
the Town to acquire in fee, from the Sandy Pond Trust, 
by purchase, eminent domain, or in any other manner, for 
conservation and recreational purposes, a certain parcel 
of land on the northeast side of the Concord Turnpike 
and adjoining land of the Town of Lincoln, containing 
20.21 acres, more or less, as shown on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. - Owned by Sumner Smith", 
dated August, 1957, Snelling, Hilton & Associates, Regis- 
tered Civil Engineers and Land Surveyors, recorded with 
the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds as plan 
#1331 of 1961, at the end of Book 9888, and for said pur- 
poses to expend from monies in the Conservation Fund 
established pursuant to the vote of the Town under Arti- 
cle 13 of the 1961 Annual Town Meeting, the sum of $9,000; 
and that the Selectmen be, and they hereby are, author- 
ized to make application to the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development, under Title VII of the Housing Act of 
1961, as amended, for a grant to acquire open space land, 
and to execute such documents as may be necessary to ob- 
tain such a grant. 

Article 14. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to acquire for conservation and recreation purposes, 
or any other purpose, by eminent domain, purchase, or in 
any other way, from George G. Tarbell, Trustee, a certain 
parcel of land located at the northeast corner of Sandy 
Pond, said parcel having an area of 12 acres, more or 
less, and for such purpose to expend from monies in the 
Conservation Fund established pursuant to the vote of the 
Town under Article 13 of the 1961 Annual Town Meeting, 
the sum of $30,000.00, or some other sum, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Selectmen be, and they are, 
hereby authorized and empowered in the name and on be- 
half of the Town to acquire in fee, from George G. Tar- 
bell, Trustee, by purchase, eminent domain, or in any 
other manner, for conservation and recreational purposes, 
a certain parcel of land located at the northeast corner 
of Sandy Pond, said parcel having an area of 12 acres, 

29 



more or less, as shown on plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Lincoln", Rowland H. Barnes & Co., Civil Engineers, dated 
November, 1940, being Land Court plan #17910A, recorded 
with the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, Reg- 
istered Land Section, in Book 326, page 295, and for such 
purpose to expend from the monies in the Conservation 
Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 13 of the 1961 Annual 'Town Meeting, the sum of 
$30,000.00; and that the Selectmen be, and they hereby 
are, authorized to make application to the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development, under Title VII of the 
Housing Act of 1961, as amended, for a grant to acquire 
open space land, and to execute such other documents as 
may be necessary to obtain such a grant. 

Article 15. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to hold Town caucuses for the nomination of candi- 
dates for Town Officers required to be voted for by 
official ballot at its annual meetings, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : A motion "that for the year 1967 and 

for each year thereafter a town caucus shall be held for 
the nomination of candidates for Town offices required 
to be voted for by official ballot at the Annual Town 
Meeting, under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
53, Section 121, as amended by Acts of 1936, Chapter 204" 
was lost. 

Article 16. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to authorize the. Planning Board to contract for the 
aerial survey of the Town, and the preparation of maps 
therefrom, and to raise and appropriate the sum of $10,000 
or any other sum, therefor, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED : A motion "that there be raised and 

appropriated the sum of $10,000.00 for an aerial survey 
of the Town, said survey to serve as the basis for the 
subsequent preparation of atlas maps" was lost. 

Article 17. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to appropriate the sum of $14,000, or any other sum, 
for the purchase of the following equipment for the use 
of the various Public Works Departments: Post Hole Digger, 
$450.00; New Power Unit for Graders, $3,000.00; New Dump 
Truck, $5,500.00; Small tractor with mowing and snow blow- 
ing 'attachment, $1,050.00; New Truck Chassis, $4,000.00; 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

30 



VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $11,500.00 for the purchase of the following 
equipment for the use of various Public Works Depart- 
ments, said sum to be taken from the Stabilization Fund: 
Post Hole Digger, $450.00; New Dump Truck, $5,500.00; 
Small Tractor with mowing and snow blowing attachment, 
$1,050.00; New Truck Chassis, $4,500.00. 

Article 18. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500.00, or 
any other sum, for the use of the Celebrations Committee 
established by vote of the Town on March 22, 1965, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of 
$1,500.00 for the use of the Celebrations Committee es- 
tablished by vote of the Town on March 22, 1965. 



(At this point Mr. Grabill paid tribute to the won- 
derful services which Mr. Charles Y. Wadsworth, the re- 
tiring moderator, has given the Town, and the audience 
rose and gave prolonged applause. ) 



Article 19. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of re- 
modeling a room at the Lincoln Library for the joint use 
of the veterans and the Lincoln Historical Society. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1> 445.00 for the purpose of constructing 
suitable storage and display space in the Library for the 
local historical materials in the custody of the Lincoln 
Public Library. 

Article 20. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to appropriate the sum of $25,000, or any other sum, 
for repairs of Concord Road (Route 126) from Route 117 to 
the Wayland line, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $25,000.00 for resurfacing and repairs to Con- 
cord Road (Route 126) from Route 117 to the Wayland line; 
and to meet said appropriation the sum of $10,000.00 be 
raised by taxation and $15,000.00 be taken from the Sta- 



31 



bilization Fund, 



A motion to adjourn, duly seconded, was adopted at 
12:25 A. M. 

William H. Davis 
Town Clerk 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 25, 1966 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the 
Annual Town Meeting, the polls were declared open at 
8 o'clock A. M. by Mr. Russell L. Haden. Mr. Harold E. 
Lawson took over the duties of Warden at 10 o'clock A.M. 
At 12 o'clock Noon, Mr. Haden assumed the duties again. 
At 2:00 P. M. Mr. Harold E. Lawson again assumed the 
duties and declared the polls closed at 7:00 o'clock P.M, 
with the following results. (Total vote was 1,168.) 



Moderator (3 years 



Town Clerk (1 year) 



Selectman (3 years 



Assessor (3 years) 



Treasurer (1 year) 



School Committee 
(3 years) 

Regional District 
School Committee 
(3 years) 



Kenneth W. Bergen 

Scattering 

Blanks 


998 

5 
165 


William H. Davis 
Blanks 


1,098 
70 


Elliott V. Grabill 

Scattering 

Blanks 


881 

7 

280 


Douglas M. Burckett 

Scattering 

Blanks 


958 
2 

208 


Frederick B. Taylor 
Blanks 


1,018 
150 


Margaret B. Marsh 
Blanks 


957 
211 


Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Ruth W. Wales 
Blanks 


779 
382 

7 



32 



Water Commissioner 
(3 years) 


Stuart B. Avery, Jr. 

Scattering 

Blanks 




971 

3 

194 


Board of Health 
(3 years) 


Abigail D. Avery 

Scattering 

Blanks 




965 

2 

201 


Cemetery Commissioner 
(3 years) 


Robert A. Spence 
Blanks 


1 


,000 
168 


Planning Board 
(5 years) 


Robert L. Allen 

Scattering 

Blanks 




959 

2 

207 


Commissioner of 
Trust Funds (3 years) 


William T. King 
Blanks 


1. 


,001 
167 


Trustee of Bemis 
Fund (3 years) 


Paul Brooks 
Blanks 


1 


,015 
153 


Director of DeCordova 
& Dana Museum & Park 
(4 years) 


Sumner Smith 
Blanks 


1 


,042 
126 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 13, 1966 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were 
open at 7:00 o'clock A. M. for the bringing in of votes 
to the Primary Officers for the nomination of candidates 
of political parties for the offices listed below. The 
Polls were declared open .at 7:00 o'clock A. M. by the 
Warden, D. Everett Sherman, Jr. At 5:00 P. M. Mr. 
Richard J. Eaton assumed the duties of Warden, and at 
7:30 P. M. the Polls were declared closed, with the fol- 
lowing results: The total number of ballots cast was 
657; Democratic, 357; Republican, 300. 

REPUBLICAN 



Senator in Congress 



Edward W. Brooke 

Scattering 

Blanks 



267 

5 

28 



33 



Governor 



John A. Volpe 
Blanks 



279 
21 



Lt. Governor 



Francis W. Sargent 
Blanks 



269 
31 



Attorney General 



Elliot L. Richardson 
Blanks 



285 
15 



Secretary 



Raymond M. Trudel 
Blanks 



259 
41 



Treasurer 



Joseph E. Fernandes 
Blanks 



246 
54 



Auditor 



John J. Buckley 
Blanks 



268 
32 



Congressman, 
5th District 



F. Bradford Morse 
Blanks 



280 
20 



Councillor, 3rd 
District 



James Malcolm Whitney 
Blanks 



261 
39 



Senator, 5th 
Middlesex District 



James DeNormandie 
Blanks 



283 
17 



Representative in 
General Court 
(35th Middlesex) 



Paula K. Llewellen 
Blanks 



237 
63 



District Attorney 
Northern District 



James N. Gabriel 
Blanks " 



250 
50 



Register of Probate 
Middlesex County 



Scattering 
Blanks 



2 
298 



County Commissioners 
Middlesex County 



Ralph J. Bens, Jr. 
Blanks 



236 
64 



County Treasurer 
Middlesex County 



Scattering 
Blanks 



1 
299 



County Commissioner 
Middlesex County 
(to fill vacancy) 



Joseph G. Abiani 
Frederick Lowe 
Irene K. Thresher 
Blanks 



44 

36 

174 

46 



34 



DEMOCRATIC 



Senator in Congress 


Endicott Peabody 
Thomas B. Adams 
John F. Collins 
Blanks 


79 

206 

69 

3 


Governor 


Edward J. McCormack 
Kenneth P. O'Donnell 
Blanks 


155 

162 

40 


Lt. Governor 


Joseph E. McGuire 
Herbert L. Connolly 
Blanks 


114 
124 
119 


Attorney General 


Francis X. Bellotti 
Robert L. DiGiacomo 
Foster Furcolo 
Scattering 
Blanks 


75 

185 

46 

1 

50 


Secretary 


Kevin H. White 
Blanks 


246 

111 


Treasurer 


Robert Q. Crane 
Blanks 


215 
142 


Auditor 


Thaddeus Buczko 
James H. Kelly 
Blanks 


187 

62 

108 


Congressman 
5th District 


Charles H. Tsapatsaris 
Blanks 


171 
186 


Councillor 
3rd District 


George F. Cronin 
Blanks 


175 
182 


Senator, 5th 
Middlesex 


William J. Buckley 
Albert J. Hayes 
Blanks 


197 
66 
94 


Representative in 
General Court 
(35th Middlesex) 


George G. O'Dell 

Scattering 

Blanks 


182 
2 

173 


District Attorney 
Northern District 


John J. Droney 
Blanks 


175 
182 



35 



Register of Probate 
Middlesex County 



County Commissioner 
Middlesex County 



County Treasurer 
Middlesex County 



County Commissioner 
Middlesex County 
(to fill vacancy) 



John J. Harvey 


186 


Frank M. DeFino 


31 


Blanks 


140 


John L. Danehy 


70 


John James Brennan, Jr. 


52 


Dudley V. Carr 


36 


John F. Cremens 


49 


Daniel M.Mulhern 


7 


Blanks 


143 


Thomas B. Brennan 


114 


Rocco J. Antonelli 


28 


Robert H. Boland 


34 


Thomas A. Corkery 


20 


Blanks 


161 


Frederick J. Connors 


81 


Richard F. Brennan 


45 


John R. O'Neill 


77 


Blanks 


154 



STATE ELECTION 
November 8, 1966 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were 
open at 7:00 A. M. for the bringing in of votes to the 
Election Officers for the state and county officers list- 
ed below. The Polls were declared open at 7:00 o'clock 
A. M. by the Warden, D. Everett Sherman, Jr., who, with 
Richard J. Eaton, L. Bruce Long, and Roger S. Walen, car- 
ried out the duties of Wardens throughout the day. The 
Polls were declared closed at 7:30 o'clock P. M. by Rich- 
ard J. Eaton, with the following results: 



Senator in Congress 

Edward W. Brooke 
Endicott Peabody 
Lawrence Gilfedder 
Mark R. Shaw 
Blanks 



Republican 
Democratic 
Socialist-Labor 
Prohibition 



702 

305 

3 

7 

24 



36 



Governor 



John A. Volpe 
Edward J. McCormack, 
Henning A. Blomen 
John Charles Hedges 
Blanks 



Republican 
Jr. Democratic 

Socialist-Labor 
Prohibition 



1,704 

302 

6 

9 

20 



Lieutenant Governor 



Joseph E. McGuire 
Francis W. Sargent 
Grace F. Luder 
Francis A. Votano 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Prohibition 
Socialist-Labor 



299 
692 

10 
4 

36 



Attorney General 

Francis X. Bellotti 
Elliot L. Richardson 
Edgar E. Gaudet 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Socialist-Labor 



303 

1,689 

7 

42 



Secretary 

Kevin H. White 
Raymond M. Trudel 
F. Oliver Drake 
Willy N. Hogarth 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Prohibition 
Socialist-Labor 



1,020 

953 

5 

10 

53 



Treasurer 



Robert Q. Crane 
Joseph E. Fernandes 
Domenico A. Digirolamo, Jr 
Julia B. Kohler 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Socialist-Labor 
Prohibition 



821 

1,090 

13 

15 

102 



Auditor 



Thaddeus Buczko 
John J. Buckley 
August 0. Johnson 
Roger J. Williams 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Social ist-La bo r 
Prohibition 



568 

1,385 

9 

11 

68 



37 



Congressman, 5th District 



F. Bradford Morse Republican 

Charles N. Tsapatsaris Democratic 
Blanks 



1,637 

351 

53 



Councillor, 3rd District 



George F. Cronin Democratic 

James Malcolm Whitney Republican 
Blanks 



447 

1,432 

162 



Senator, 5th Middlesex 



James DeNormandie 
William J. Buckley 
Blanks 



Republican 
Democratic 



1,692 

317 
32 



Representative in General 
Court, 35th Middlesex 



Chandler H. Stevens, Jr. Independent 
Paula K. Llewellen Republican 
George J. Odell Democratic 

Blanks 



1,402 

435 

138 

66 



District Attorney, 
Northern District 



John J. Droney 
James N. Gabriel 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 



558 

1,353 

130 



Register of Probate 
and Insolvency 



John V. Harvey 
Blanks 



Democratic 



1,237 
804 



County Commissioner 
Middlesex County 



Ralph J. Bens, Jr, 
John L. Danehy 
Blanks 



Republican 
Democratic 



1,443 
376 
222 



38 



County Treasurer 
Middlesex County 

Thomas B. Brennan 
Blanks 



Democratic 



1,164 
877 



County Commissioner 
Middlesex County 
(to fill vacancy) 



Frederick J. Connors 
Irene K. Thresher 
Blanks 


Democratic 
Republican 


Question No. 1 


Yes 

No 
Blanks 


Question No. 2 


Yes 

No 
Blanks 


Question No. 3 


Yes 

No 
Blanks 


Question No. 4 


Yes 

No 
Blanks 


Question No. 5 


Yes 

No 

Blanks 


Question No. 6 


Yes 

No 
Blanks 



408 
1,402 

231 

1,578 
273 
190 

1,680 
182 
179 

1,202 
615 
224 

1,665 
176 
200 

1,635 
292 

114 

1,390 
405 
246 



Question No. 7 
A 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



456 

1,439 

146 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



517 

1, 351 

173 



39 



Yes 637 

No 1,257 

Blanks 147 

Yes 537 

No 1,317 

Blanks 187 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
November 28, 1966 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen. 
The return of the Warrant was read and the invocation 
given by Rev. Morris Robinson. The following business 
was then transacted: 

Article 1. To determine whether the Town will 
accept as a Town way a portion of Todd Pond Road from 
Station 22 plus 69.48 to and including the turnaround 
at the end thereof, as shown on plan entitled "Todd Pond, 
Lincoln, Mass., Lincoln Associates, owners", Gordon E. 
Ainsworth and Associates, Registered Land Surveyors, 
recorded in Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 10342, Page 290; and to determine whether the Town 
for this purpose will authorize the Board of Selectmen 
'to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or otherwise, the 
land therein contained, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town accept as a Town Way a 

portion of Todd Pond Road from Station 22 plus 69.48 to 
and including the turnaround at the end thereof, as 
shown on plan entitled "Todd Pond, Lincoln, Mass., Lin- 
coln Associates, Owners", Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associ- 
ates, Registered Land Surveyors, recorded in Middlesex 
South District Registry of Deeds, Book 10342, Page 290; 
and that for this purpose the Town hereby authorizes the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, pur- 
chase, or otherwise, the land therein contained, and to 
accept a confirmatory deed thereto. 

Article 2. To determine whether the Town will 
accept as a Town Way Hiddenwood Path, from Tower Road to 
and including the turnaround, as shown on a plan entitled 
"A Subdivision in Lincoln, Mass.", dated July 9, 1964, as 

40 



revised, Schofield Brothers, Registered Land Surveyors 
and Civil Engineers, recorded with Middlesex South Regis- 
try of Deeds, Book 10704, Page 494; and to determine 
whether the Town, for this purpose, will authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, 
or otherwise, the land contained therein, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town accept as a Town Way 
Hiddenwood Path from Tower Road, to and including the 
turnaround, as shown on a plan entitled "A Subdivision 
in Lincoln, Mass.", dated July 9, 1964, as revised, Scho- 
field Brothers, Registered Land Surveyors and Civil En- 
gineers, recorded with Middlesex South District Registry 
of Deeds, Book 10704, Page 494, and that for this purpose 
the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain, purchase, or otherwise, the land therein 
contained, and to accept a confirmatory deed thereto. 

Article 3. To determine whether the Town will 
accept as a Town Way Ridge Road from Lincoln Road to the 
end as shown on plan entitled "Ridgewood Acres in Lin- 
coln, Mass.", dated May 7, 1965, Albert A. Miller and 
Wilbur C. Nylander, Civil Engineers & Surveyors, record- 
ed in Book 10845, Page 76, in the Middlesex South District 
Registry of Deeds; and to determine whether the Town for 
this purpose will authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or otherwise, the 
land therein contained, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town accept as a Town Way 
Ridge Road from Lincoln Road to the end as shown on plan 
entitled "Ridgewood Acres in Lincoln, Mass.", dated May 
7, 1965, Albert A. Miller and Wilbur C. Nylander, Civil 
Engineers & Surveyors, recorded in Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds, Book 10845, Page 76; and that 
for this purpose the Town authorizes the Board of Select- 
men to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or otherwise, 
the land therein contained, and to accept a confirmatory 
deed thereto. 

Article 4. To determine whether the Town will 
accept as a Town Way that portion of Pheasant Lane situa- 
ted within' the Town of Lincoln, from Goose Pond Road to 
the Lincoln-Concord town line, about two hundred (200) 
feet, more or less, as shown on a plan entitled "Plans 
and Profiles of Bridle Trail Estates, Section 1, in Con- 



41 



cord and Lincoln", dated November 19, 1964, Albert A. 
Miller and Wilbur C. Nylander, Engineers and Surveyors, 
recorded in Book 10784, at the end, in the Middlesex 
South District Registry of Deeds; and to determine wheth- 
er the Town, for this purpos'e, will authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or 
otherwise, the land therein contained, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town accept as a Town Way 

that portion of Pheasant Lane situated within the Town 
of Lincoln, from Goose Pond Road to the Lincoln-Concord 
town l;Lne, about two hundred (200) feet, more or less, as 
shown on a plan entitled -"Plans and Profiles of Bridle 
Trail Estates, Section 1, in Concord and Lincoln", dated 
November 19, 1964, Albert A. Miller and Wilbur C. Nyland- 
er, Engineers and Surveyors, recorded in Middlesex South 
District Registry of Deeds, Book 10784, at the end; and 
for this purpose the Town authorizes the Board of Select- 
men to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or otherwise, 
the land therein contained, and to accept a confirmatory 
deed thereto. 

Article 5. To vote by ballot on a proposal to 
amend the agreement between the Town of Lincoln and Sud- 
bury with respect to the formation of a Regional School 
District, so as to provide for the crediting by the Dis- 
trict of Federal, State, or other aids and grants, and 
apportioning only the net costs to the member Towns, and 
as more particularly set forth in the proposal, namely: 

" (F) Apportionment of State and Federal Aid 

Effective in the fiscal year commencing January 1, 
1967, any Federal, State, or other aids or grants re- 
ceived by the District shall be credited by the District 
to the construction cost account or the operating expense 
account, as appropriate, and the construction costs and 
operating expenses to be apportioned to the member Towns 
under Sections 5 (B) , 5 (E) , and 9 hereof, shall be the 
net costs after the application of such aids or grants. " 

VOTED : To ballot on a proposal to amend the 
agreement between the Towns of Lincoln and Sudbury with 
respect to the formation of a Regional School District, 
so as to provide for the crediting by the District of 
federal, state, or other aids and grants, and apportion- 
ing only the net costs to the member towns* and as more 
particularly set forth, namely: 

Amendment No. 1. To amend paragraph (f) of Section 
5 by deleting the said paragraph in its entirety and sub- 

42 



stituting the following new paragraph: 

" (f) Apportionment of State and Federal Aid: 
Effective the fiscal year commencing January 1, 1967, 
any Federal, State, or other aids or grants received by 
the District, shall be credited by the District to the 
construction cost account or the operating expense ac- 
count, as appropriate, and the construction costs and 
operating expenses to be apportioned to the member Towns 
under Section 5 '* (b) , 5 (e) , and 9 hereof, shall be the 
net costs after the application of such aids or grants. " 
(Yes, 243; No. 13) 

Article 6. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to acquire for conservation and recreational pur- 
poses by eminent domain, purchase, or in any other way, 
from the Estate of George U. Browning, two certain par- 
cels of land, the first being on the southeasterly side 
of Weston Road and the northeasterly side of Conant Road, 
as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Mass.", dated November, 1966, by Cleverdon, Varney & 
Pike, containing 11.2 acres, more or less, as shown on 
said plan, and the second being on the southeasterly side 
of Weston Road and the southwesterly side of Conant Road, 
as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Mass.", dated November, 1966, by Cleverdon, Varney & 
Pike, containing 7.9 acres, more or less, as shown on 
said plan, and for such purpose to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money therefor, and to determine whether to pro- 
vide said sum by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, or by borrowing under the authority of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3) , or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be and hereby are 
authorized and empowered in the name and on behalf of the 
Town to acquire in fee, by eminent domain, purchase, or 
any other way, for conservation and recreational purposes, 
from the Estate of George U. Browning, two certain par- 
cels of land, the first being on the southeasterly side 
of Weston Road and the northeasterly side of Conant Road, 
as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Mass.", dated November, 1966, by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, 
to be recorded with Middlesex South Registry of Deeds, 
containing 11.2 acres more or less, as shown on said 
plan, and the second being on the southeasterly side of 
Weston Road and the southwesterly side of Conant Road, 
as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 

43 



Mass.", dated November, 1966, by Cleverdon, Varney & 
Pike, to be recorded with Middlesex South District Reg- 
istry of Deeds, containing 7.9 acres more or less, as 
shown on said plan; that the sum of $66,850 be raised 
and appropriated therefor; that to meet said appropria- 
tion the sum of $1,000 be and hereby is appropriated 
from the Conservation Fund established pursuant to the 
vote of the Town under Article 13 of the 1961 Annual 
Town Meeting, the sum of $5,850 be and hereby. is appro- 
priated from Free Cash, and the Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is, authorized to 
borrow the sum of $60,000 under the provisions of Chap- 
ter 44, Section 7, Clause (3) of the General Laws, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in 
accordance with Chapter 44, so that the whole loan will 
be paid in not more than twenty (20) years from the date 
of the issue of the first bond or note; and that the Se- 
lectmen be and hereby are authorized 1) to make applica- 
tion to the U. S. House and Home Finance Agency, under 
Title VII of the Housing Act of 1961 for a grant to ac- 
quire open space land; 2) to make application to the 
Commissioner of Natural Resources for the Commonwealth 
under Section 11 of Chapter 132A of the' General Laws for 
reimbursement of the expenditures hereby authorized, any 
such reimbursement to be used as provided in said Section; 
and 3) to execute in the name and on behalf of the Town 
such other documents as may be necessary or desirable to 
carry out the provisions of this vote. 

Article 7. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to acquire for conservation and recreational pur- 
poses by eminent domain, purchase, or in any other way, 
from Donald H. & Joan B. Warren a certain parcel of land 
on the northeasterly side of Conant Road, shown as Lot 
A-l on a plan of land entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Mass., owned by Donald H. & Joan B. Warren", dated July 
30, 1966, by Snelling, Hilton & Associates, Civil Engin- 
eers and Land Surveyors, containing 19 acres more or less, 
as shown on said plan, and for such purpose to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money therefor, and to determine 
whether to provide said sum by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by borrowing under the authority of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3) , or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be and hereby are 

authorized and empowered in the name and on behalf of the 



44 



Town to acquire in fee by eminent domain, purchase, or 
any other way, for conservation and recreational purposes 
from Donald H. & Joan B. Warren a certain parcel of land 
on the northeasterly side of Conant Road, shown as Lot 
A-l on a plan of land entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Mass., Owned by Donald H. & Joan B. Warren 11 , dated July 
30, 1966, by Snelling, Hilton & Associates, Civil Engin- 
eers and Land Surveyors, to be recorded with Middlesex 
South District Registry of Deeds, containing 19 acres, 
more or less, as shown on said plan; that the sum of 
$20,000 be raised and appropriated therefor; that to 
meet said appropriation, the sum of $5,000.00 be and 
hereby is appropriated from Free Cash, and the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is auth- 
orized to borrow the sum of $15,000.00 under the provis- 
ions of Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3) of the General 
Laws, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, 
payable in accordance with said Chapter 44, so that the 
whole loan will be paid in not more than twenty (20) 
years from the date of the issue of the first bond or 
note; and that the Selectmen be and hereby are authorized 
1) to make application to the U. S. House and Home Fin- 
ance Agency under Title VII of the Housing Act of 1961, 
for a grant to acquire open space land; 2) to make appli- 
cation to the Commissioner of Natural Resources for the 
Commonwealth under Section 11 of Chapter 132A of the Gen- 
eral Laws for reimbursement of the expenditures hereby 
authorized, any such reimbursement to be used as provided 
in said Section; and 3) to execute in the name and on be- 
half of the Town such other documents as may be necessary 
or desirable to carry out the provisions of this vote. 

Article 8. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to acquire for water source and other Water Depart- 
ment purposes, by eminent domain, purchase, or in any 
other way, from Joseph R. Campobasso, and Guiseppe Campo- 
basso, the fee in a certain parcel of land on the wester- 
ly side of Tower Road, subject to a life estate to said 
Guiseppe Campobasso, said parcel being shown as Lot B on 
a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. belonging 
to C. Lee Todd", dated March 13, 1937, by E. N. Montague, 
Civil Engineer, and recorded with Middlesex So. Registry 
of Deeds, Book 7792, Page 46, and for such purpose to 
raise and appropriate a sum of money therefor, and to de- 
termine whether to provide said sum by taxation, by trans- 
fer from available funds, or by borrowing under the author- 
ity of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8, Cl. (3), or 

45 



take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Selectmen be and hereby are 

authorized and empowered in the name and on behalf of 
the Town to acquire for water source and other Water De- 
partment purposes by eminent domain, purchase, or in any 
other way, from Joseph R. Campo basso and Guiseppe Campo- 
basso, the fee in a certain parcel of land on the wester- 
ly side of Tower Road, subject to a life estate to said 
Guiseppe Campobasso, said parcel being shown as Lot B, 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass., be- 
longing to C. Lee Todd", dated March 13, 1937, by E. N. 
Montague, Civil Engineer, and recorded with Middlesex 
South District Registry of Deeds, Book 7792, Page 46, 
and that the sum of $10,000 be appropriated from Free 
Cash. 

Article 9. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to transfer the following sums in the Water Depart- 
ment budget: $1,000.00 from General Expense (952) to 
Water Transmission Expense (954); $1,000.00 from Water 
Supply Expense (953) to Water Transmission Expense (954) , 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the sum of $1,000.00 be trans- 
ferred from the Water Department General Expense account 
to the Water Transmission expense account, and that the 
sum of $500.00 be transferred from the Water Department 
Supply expense account to the Water Transmission expense 
account. 

Article 10. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to increase the Water Department interest on Bonds 
Account (956) by '$712.83 ,or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED: That the Water Department Interest on 

Bonds account be increased by the sum of $712.83, said 
sum to be taken from Water Department surplus. 

Article 11. To determine whether the Town will 
vote to amend the Zoning Map of Lincoln, Mass., dated 
February 2, 1953, as heretofore amended, to include with- 
in the C-Open-Space Conservation District of the Town 
under the Town's Zoning By-Law, certain parcels of land 
in the cluster subdivision on the northwesterly side of 
Tower Road between Stonehedge and the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road, now or formerly of Wes-Lex Corpo'ration, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Zoning Map of the Town of 

46 



Lincoln dated February 2, 1953, as heretofore amended, 
be further amended to include within the C-Open-Space 
Conservation District established under Section V-C of 
the Zoning By-Law of the Town those portions of Lots 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, designated for such inclusion in the 
C-Open-Space Conservation District, as shown on a plan 
entitled "A Subdivision in Lincoln, Mass.", by Schofield 
Brothers, Registered Land Surveyors and Civil Engineers, 
Owner and Developer-, . Wes-Lex Corporation, dated July 9, 
1964, and filed with the Middlesex South District Regis- 
try of Deeds in Book 10704, Page 494, and on a plan en- 
titled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass., Property of Wes- 
Lex Corporation", by Schofield Brothers, Registered Land 
Surveyors and Civil Engineers, dated June 13, 1966, 3rd 
revision November 1, 1966, to be recorded in said Middle- 
sex South District Registry of Deeds. 

On motion duly seconded, the Meeting was adjourned 
at 10:45 P. M. 

William H. Davis 
Town Clerk 



47 




The Flint Field 



Finance 

TOWN TREASURER 

Frederick B. Taylor 

TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1966 



General 



Water 



Total 



Cash balance 1/1/66 

Receipts - 1966 

(See Accountant's report 

for details) 4,187,464.36 
Service transfers 2,024.99 

Warrant payments - 

1966 4,369,927.62 

Cash balance 12/31/66 $ 432,260.44 



$ 612,698.71 $ 35,836.56 $ 648,535.27 

4,347,677.05 
4,511,544.41 



160,212.69 
-2,024.99 



141,616.79 
$ 52,407.47 



Treasury bills and 

certificates of deposit 247,147.00 

$ 679,407.44 
48 



$ 484,667.91 



247,147.00 



$ 52,407.47 $ 731,814.91 



General 



Water 



Total 



Cash balance 12/31/66: 










Harvard Trust Co. 


$ 51, 340.75 


$52, 


, 407.47 


$103,748.22 


Harvard Trust Co. - 










cafeteria acc't. 


11,059.48 







11,059.48 


N. E. Merchants 










National 


283,860.48 







283,860.48 


Concord Cooperative 










Bank 


6,000.00 







6,000.00 


First National Bank 










of Boston 


708.82 







708.82 


Belmont Savings Bank 


6,700.93 







6,700.93 


Beverly Savings Bank 


7,320.19 







7,320.19 


Boston 5C Savings Bank 


6,740.90 







6,740.90 


Brookline Savings Bank 


3,753.53 







3,753.53 


Cambridge Savings Bank 


8,041.54 







8,041.54 


Charles town Savings Bk 


. 8,431.91 







8,431.91 


Lynn 5C Savings Bank 


7,517.31 







7,517.31 


Newton Savings Bank 


7,531.22 







7,531.22 


Provident Institution 










for Savings 


7,654.14 







7,654.14 


Waltham Savings Bank 


4,590.55 







4,590.55 


Warren Institution 










for Savings 


11,008.69 
$432,260.44 







11,008.69 




$52, 


,407.47 


$484,667.91 


Certificate of 










deposit - due 










1/19/67 


100,000.00 







100,000.00 


Treasury bills - 










due 2/16/67 


147,147.00 
$679,407.44 







147,147.00 


Balance 12/31/66 


$52, 


,407.47 


$731,814.91 



CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1966 
Proceeds of cemetery lots sold in 1966 
1966 savings bank interest 



Deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings 



$ 450.00 

1,129.50 

630.89 

$ 2,210.39 

2,210.39 



Middlesex Institution for Savings 



$ 16,455.63 



STABILIZATION FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1966 $ 335.71 

Appropriations to Fund at March 21, 1966 

Town Meeting 

For school purposes 20,000.00 

For equipment 10,000.00 

Interest income in 1966 3,813.25 

$34,148.96 

Deduct ; 

Appropriations from Fund at March 21, 1966 

Town Meeting 

For equipment $11,500.00 

For roads (from unallocated 

increment) 15,000.00 

$26,500.00 
Savings bank interest allowed 

to accumulate 3,813.25 

Deposited in Home Savings Bank 3,800.00 34,113.25 

Cash balance at December 31, 1966 $ 35.71 



First National Bank of Boston $ 35.71 

Boston 5C Savings Bank 27,713.22 

Home Savings Bank 7,485.75 

Natick 5C Savings Bank 6,042.35 

Suffolk-Franklin Savings Bank 16,952.55 

Warren Institution for Savings 26,898.70 

Whitman Savings Bank 7,853.74 

$ 92,982.02 



Earmarked Balances in Fund 

For school purposes $52,460.00 

For equipment 36,500.00 

Unallocated increment 4,022.02 



$ 92,982.02 



50 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1966 

Appropriation to Fund at March 21/ 1966 

Town Meeting 

Savings bank interest 

Savings bank withdrawal 



Appropriations from Fund at March 21 , 1966 
Town Meeting $39,000.00 

Same, at Nov. 28, 1966 Town Meeting 1,000.00 
Savings bank interest allowed 

to accumulate 47.64 

Cash balance at December 31, 1966 



$ 55.55 

39,000.00 

47.64 

950.00 

$40,053.19 



40,047.64 
$ 5.55 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1966 



First National Bank of Boston 
Boston 5C Savings Bank 



5.55 
226.43 
231.98 



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53 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 



$ 20,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $10,000 each 

December 1, 1967-1968> issued under Chapter 208, 
Acts of 1948. 

8,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each 

December 1, 1967-1968, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws as amended. 

60,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $12,000 each 
December 1, 1967-1971, issued under Chapter 356, 
Acts of 1951. 

20,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each 

December 1, 1967-1971, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws as amended. 

220,000 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000 each 

October 1, 1967-1977, issued under the Acts of 
1948. 

30,000 School Construction Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each 
October 1, 1967-1972, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws as amended. 

135,000 School Project Loan, 3.70%, due $15,000 November 
1, 1967 and $10,000 each November 1, 1968-1979, 
issued under the Acts of 1948. 

590,000 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $40,000 each 

November 15, 1967-1972, and $35,000 each November 
15, 1973-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

80,000 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000 each 

November 15, 1967-1982, issued under the Acts of 
1948. 



$1,163,000 Total School Loans 

55,000 Fire and Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 
each October 1, 1967-1977, issued under Chapter 
44, General Laws as amended. 

20,000 Library Addition Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 each 
August 1, 1967-1970, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws as amended. 

10,000 Land Purchase Loan, 2.80%, due $5,000 each 

December 1, 1967-1968, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws as amended. 

75,000 Anticipation Serial Loan, 3 3/4%, due May 1, 1966 



$1,32 3,000 Net Debt 

54 



10/000 Water Mains Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 each August 
1, 1967-1968, issued under Chapter 44, General 
Laws as amended. 

75,000 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $10,000 each August 1, 
1967-1972, and $8,000 on August 1, 1973, and 
$7,000 on August 1, 1974, issued under Chapter 
44, General Laws as amended. 

3,000 Water Mains Loan, 2.80%, due $1,000 each 

December 1, 1967-1969, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws as amended. 

60,000 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $5,000 each August 15, 

1967-1978, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 
as amended. 

50,000 Water Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000 each May 1, 1967- 
1976, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 



$1,521,000 Total Debt at December 31, 1966 



55 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

M. Elizabeth Causer 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



Real and Personal 

Valuation 1964, less abatements $13,643,961 

Valuation 1965, less abatements 14,147,172 

Valuation 1966, less abatements 37,463,710 

Motor Vehicle 

Valuation 1964, less abatements 1,964,122 

Valuation 1965, less abatements 2,103,578 

Valuation 1966, less abatements 2,186,366 

Net Valuation 71,508,909 

Average Net Valuation 23,836,303 

5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 1,191,815 



FUNDED DEBT 

Antic. Serial 75,000 

General, Inside Limit 143,000 

Outside Limit 1,105,000 

Enterprise, ^ater 198,000 

Antic. Serial 75,000 

Total Funded Debt, January 1, 1967 $1,446,000 

Available Borrowing .Capacity 1/1/67 $1,048,815 



56 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Current Year: 

Personal Tax $ 76,299.65 

Real Estate Tax 1,219, 514.79 



Prior Years: 

Personal Tax 434.00 

Real Estate Tax 29,119.60 



From the State: 

Veterans' Benefits 34.37 

Old Age Assistance 7,574.32 

Old Age Assistance Adm. 405.74 

Medical Assistance 6,942.50 

Medical Assistance Adm. 331.51 
Tuition & Transportation 

of Children 659.82 

Aid to Libraries 1,403.25 

Loss of Taxes 1/493.05 

Valuation Basis 105,705.61 

Abatements to Veterans 980.00 

Special Education Program 2,699.00 

Special Aid, Ch. 70 52,667.10 

Meals Tax 1,251.30 



From Federal Grants: 

Old Age Assistance 5,673.00 

Old Age Assistance Adm. 915.49 

Medical Aid to the Aged 10, 452! 58 

Medical Aid to the Aged Adm. 605.67 



$1,295,814.44 



29,553.60 



182,153.57 



City of Cambridge in lieu 

of taxes 568.09 

Permits: 

Building 2,272.12 

Plumbing 835.00 

Wiring " 1,078.30 

4,185.42 

Fines : 

Court 191.00 

Grants and Gifts: 

School Construction 42,833.87 

School Transportation 34, 745.00 



77,578.87 



17,646.74 



57 



School Aid, Ch. 864 
School Aid, Ch. 874 
Title 1/ Co-op Research 
Air Force School 



From County: 
Dog Licenses 

Privileges 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax; 

1963 

1964 

1965 

1966 
Farm Animal Excise 



$ 718.90 
18,765.00 
11,910.00 

648,655.59 



39.35 

277.08 

14,387.95 

131,242.43 

55.37 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 
Town Clerk 
Collector of Taxes 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Town Hall Rental 



288.56 
4.00 
122.00 
80.00 
210.00 
275.00 



$680,049.49 
751.97 



146,002.18 



979.56 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police - pistol permits 

- insurance reports 

- Regional School 

attendance officer 



149.50 
135.00 

60.00 



Fire Department 



Dog Inoculations 
Garbage collection 
Licenses 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 

352.50 

8,619.52 

43.00 



344.50 
98.81 



9,015.02 



HIGHWAYS 



Miscellaneous 

Chapter 90 Construction 

State Aid 

County Aid 
Commonwealth of Mass. : 

Snow removal 



63.75 

2,023.18 

1,761.59 

328.50 



4,177.02 



58 



PUBLIC WELFARE 

Refunds and reimbursements $ 4,764.52 

SCHOOLS 

Tuition $ 1,651.00 
Metco 1,125.00 
Rentals and miscellaneous 279.85 
Rental of class rooms by- 
Air Force School 12,000.00 
Milk Fund 7,618.86 
Air Force School Cafeteria 25,837.23 



LIBRARY 

Library fines 1^958.69 

Miscellaneous 77,1.12 



UNCLASSIFIED 



RECREATION 

Stagemobile 73.50 

Tennis instruction 499.50 

Skiing instruction 249.53 

Arts and crafts 944.75 

Golf instruction 324.00 



CEMETERIES 

Interments 775.00 

Foundations 148. 38 



INTEREST 

Interest on taxes 1,520.74 

Interest on deposits 3,472.91 

Interest on investments 11, 313.15 



48,511.94 



2,729.81 



Telephone fees 35.53 

DeCordova reimbursement 

for State audit 200.00 

Insurance refunds & settlements 344.50 

Air Force School reimbursement 9,042.52 

Water Department reimbursement 2,776.03 

Transfer from Water Department 1, 575.00 



13,973.58 



2,091.28 



923.38 



16,306.80 



59 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENTS 

Conservation Fund $ 1,000.00 

Dog licenses 1,349.75 

Grammar School Fund 51.34 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund 961.2 3 

Deputy Collector 64.28 

Non-Revenue Investment 698, 841. 41 



REFUNDS 



$702,268.01 



Refunds and cancellations 



716.98 



LOANS 



Employee deductions 
Mass. payment for services 
Temporary loans 
Conservation land loan 
Interest on loan 



Total General Receipts 

Cash balance, January 1, 1966 



272,858.59 

124.80 

600,000.00 

75,000.00 

109.38 



948,092.77 
$4,189,489.35 

612,698.71 
$4,802,188.06 



WATER REVENUE 



Water rates 
Water connections 
Miscellaneous 
Rent of hydrants 
Interest on loan 
Premium on loan 
Loans 



Cash balance, January 1, 1966 



42,816.59 

31,550.00 
777.07 

14,950.00 
96.53 
22.50 

70,000.00 



$ 160,212.69 

35,836.56 

$ 196,049.25 



60 



EXPENDITURES 
Payments on Selectmen's Warrants 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 

Executive Secretary 

Finance Committee 

Town Office 

Town Accountant 

Treasurer 

Collector 

Assessors 

Legal 

Town Clerk 

Election and Registration 

Planning Board 

Board of Appeals 

Conservation Commission 

Consulting and Engineering 

Town Hall 



$ 989.82 

12,354.30 

15.00 

18,623.05 

4,726.92 

1,148.10 

3,856.95 

2,900.85 

3,389.85 

709.86 

1,277.17 

488.64 

87.37 

33.00 

10,499.07 

9,272.93 



$ 70,372.88 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police 

Fire 

Communications 

Civil Defense 

Fire and Police Building 

Park Department 

Inspectors of Buildings 



55,570.38 

52,284.66 

17,903.28 

2,098.71 

4,468.19 

12,668.09 

3,201.00 



148,194.31 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Salaries 
Expense 

Inspection service 
Garbage collection 
Inspector of animals 



4,968.34 
3,046.40 
1,563.85 
7,877.18 
100.00 



17,555.77 



HIGHWAYS 



Highways, General 
Highway building 
Tower Road repairs 
Concord Road repairs 
Highway equipment 
Chapter 90 maintenance 



88,584.35 

4,546.87 

1,512.76 

15,375.75 

10,732.54 

9,000.00 



129,752.27 



61 



CHARITIES 

Aid to Citizens $ 35,262.47 
Administration 2,853.60 

Veterans' Services 654.80 



EDUCATION 

Elementary School 771,765.31 

Regional High School 298,925.77 

Elementary School Construction 1,313.05 

Chapter 864 551.47 

Chapter 874 33.45 

Title 1, Co-op. Research 7,312.27 

Air Force School 617,854.11 



LIBRARY 

Library 31,393.82 

Library building 5, 469.19 



RECREATION 

Playground 7,244.39 
Swimming 70.00 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 17,838.77 
Employee Insurance & 

Hospital Fund 15,619.64 

Property & Indemnity Insurance 15,928.10 

Dump rent and maintenance 4,500.00 

Town Reports 2,454.61 

Celebrations Committee 1,543.15 

Preservation of Town Records 159.08 

Unpaid 1965 bills 169.56 

Purchase of Tarbell land 30,000.00 
Purchase of Sandy Pond Trust land 9,000.00 

Stabilization Fund 3, 500.00 



62 



38,969.60 



1,697,755.43 



36,863.01 



7,314.39 



CEMETERIES 

Cemeteries 3,280.83 

TOWN DEBT SERVICE 

Bond payments 130,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 41,975.00 
Interest on Tax Anticipation 

Notes 6, 679.27 



178,654.27 



100,712.91 



Refunds 



REFUNDS 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



Non-revenue Cash Investment 

Dog Licenses, due County 

Milk Fund 

Hanscom School Cafeteria 

Repayment of Temporary /Loan 

State Audit 

County Hospital Assessment 

County Tax 

Motor Vehicle Excise bills 

M. A. P. C. 

Public Welfare reimbursement 

State Parks and Reservations 

M. B. T. A. 

Agency account 



Employee deductions 

Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1966 



$945,988.41 

1,378.00 

8,517.76 

27,582.22 

600,000.00 

1,905.38 

892.92 

57,338.28 

508.20 

244.59 

599.59 

4,642.54 

3,768.86 

123.28 



EXPENDITURES 
Water Department 



Salaries and Wages 

General Expense 

Water Supply Expense 

Water Transmission Expense 

Bonds and Interest 

Water Refund 

Water Source Land 

Water Easement 

Water Mains 

Development of Well Field 

Total Water Department Expense 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1966 



17,598.38 
2,624.48 
8,409.32 
9,788.24 

51,282.83 

3.50 

2,483.00 

1.00 

8,740.28 

42,710.75 



14,161.41 



1,653,490.03 



$ 4,369,927.62 



432,260.44 



$ 4,802,188.06 



143,641.78 



196,049.25 



63 



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78 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1966 
GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ASSETS 



Cash: 






General 






Water 






Petty Cash Accounts 






Accounts Receivable: 






Taxes : 






Levy of 1963: 






Personal 




$ 117.60 


Levy of 1965: 






Personal 




138.60 


Real 




1,838.00 


Levy of 1966: 






Personal 




561.05 


Real 




22,382.74 


Motor Vehicle & Trailer 


Excise: 




Levy of 1963 




919.82 


Levy of 1964 




336.62 


Levy of 1965 




787.47 


Levy of 1966 




16,703.03 



Non-Revenue Cash Investment 

Board of Health: 

Garbage Collections 

State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 

Underestimates : 
State Parks 
M. A. P. C. 
County Tax 

Water: 

Rates, 1966 
Miscellaneous 



$ 432,260.44 
52,407.47 

65.00 



117.60 

1,976.60 

22,943.79 



18,746.94 
247,147.00 

540.80 

24,791.99 
6,396.00 



829.59 
22.93 

11,074.64 



10,551.45 
693.00 

$ 830,565.24 



79 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVE 

Proceeds of Dog Licenses 

Due County $ 20.00 

Trust Fund Income : 

Julian DeCordova School 

Equipment Fund 961.23 

Grammar School Fund 51.34 

Federal Grants : 

Disability Assistance Adm. $ 196.26 

Disability Assistance 413.94 

Aid to Dependent Families Adm. 2 36.21 

Aid to Dependent Families 352.72 

Old Age Assistance Adm. 142.73 

Old Age Assistance 158.03 

Medical Assistance Adm. 258.58 
Medical Assistance 1 / 710.53 3,469.00 

Welfare Reimbursements: 

Old Age Assistance 4,554.48 

Medical Assistance 10.00 

Schools : 

Title 1 - Co-operative Research 4,597.73 

P. L. 864 394.04 

P. L. 874 11,351.00 

Air Force School 384,357.83 

Air Force School Cafeteria 578.52 

School Milk Fund 216.51 401,495.63 

State Aid to Libraries^ 1,403.25 

Petty Cash 65.00 

Appropriation Balances : 
Revenue : 

General 150,451.84 

Water 22,582.16 

Overpayment to be refunded: 

1963 Real 5.90 

Overlays Reserved for Abatement: 

Levy of. 1963 117.60 

Levy of 1965 1,976.60 

Levy of 1966 458.37 2,552.57 

Overlay Surplus 22,945.60 

Interest on Loan 109.38 

Premium on Water Loan 105.14 

Agency Account 15.00 



80 



Revenue Reserved Until 
Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Revenue 
Water Rates, 1966 
Water, Miscellaneous 

Board of Health: 

Garbage Collection 

Aid to Highways 

Overestimates, 1966 

Surplus Revenue : 
General 
Water 



$ 18,746.94 

10,551.45 

693.00 



29,991.39 

540.80 

31,187.99 

41.71 



128,285.66 
29,720.17 

$ 830,565.24 



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83 






BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 
Frank R. Stevens 
John B. French 



As stipulated in our last report, a list of valuations as 
revised by the building appraisal of 1965 was furnished to the 
taxpayers of the Town in May, 1966. Subsequent to its distri- 
bution a schedule of meetings was set up to handle the requests 
of some sixty persons who wished to discuss with the Board and 
its consultant appraiser their valuations as listed. Upon com- 
pletion of these meetings some time lag occurred before the tax 
rate was set as the Board was hoping for favorable action of 
the Legislature on a bill which, if it had passed, would have 
increased the State Aid received by the Town. 

Even with all the preliminary work done by the Board in 
trying to work with any one having questions on their revised 
valuation prior to sending out the tax bills, the receipt of 
the tax bill seemed to bring the matter more into focus and con- 
sequently the Board, during the fall, was kept busy arranging 
appointments with those persons who filed abatement papers. 

The Board believes that the aforementioned time was well 
spent as it has resulted in a fairer system of valuations which 
has placed all taxpayers on a more equitable basis. As the 
valuations have approached the limit of full and fair value, it 
is understandable that each individual becomes much more aware 
of his taxable valuation, and any inequities are more pronounced, 
The present status is a step forward but the Board recognizes 
that there are other steps to be taken and it will now concern 
itself with some of these. 

In order to keep valuations of new buildings on a compara- 
ble basis, the Board feels that it should employ a professional 
appraiser (if possible, the same one who did the appraisal of 
the Town in 1965) at the beginning of each year to appraise the 
new buildings and those which may have had a considerable reno- 
vation or addition during the year. With this in mind, the 
Board will include in its budget for the next year an amount 
for such services. 

There are many regulations dealing with real estate and 
excise taxes, but we list herewith only a few that are general- 
ly applicable to the Town: 

1. The status of property on January 1st is the deter- 
minant of the tax in any year. 

2. All real estate and personal property tax abatements 
requests must be filed with the Board by October 1st 
of the year in question. 



84 






3. Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement re- 
quests must be filed with the Board before July 1 of 
the year succeeding the year in question. If you 
change cars during the year, the burden is on you to 
file the abatement request. 

4. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41, of the General Laws, 
as amended, provides for certain exemptions for tax- 
payers over the age of 70, who meet certain require- 
ments of income, residence, etc. Additional inform- 
ation may be obtained from the Assessors' Office. 

5. Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of the 
Purple Heart awards, and others, may qualify for a tax 
exemption. Please contact the Board to see if you 
qualify. 

The Board appreciates the cooperation and understanding that 
it has had during this year of major changes. 



1966 Recapitulation 



Total appropriations to be raised 

from taxation 
Total appropriations to be taken 

from available funds 



$1,696,870.48 
346,037.91 



State Parks and Reservations 

State Audit of Municipal Accounts 

M. A. P. C. 

Underestimate, 1965, M. A. P. C. 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 

M. B. T. A. 



3,812.95 

1,905.38 

221.66 

221.66 

508.20 

3,810.57 



County Tax 

Underestimate, 1965 County Tax 

County Hospital Assessment 



46,263.64 

2,921.29 

892.92 



Other amounts required to be raised 
Overlay of Current Year 
Gross Amount to be Raised 



7,010.30 

19,825.65 

$ 2,130,302.61 



Estimated Receipts & Available Funds: 
Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 
General Government 
Protection of Persons & Property 
Health & Sanitation 
Libraries 
Recreation 
Interest 
City of Cambridge, in lieu of taxes 



155,000.00 
3,807.00 
1,500.00 
8,324.00 
2,079.00 
3,772.00 
10,979.00 
1,249.00 



85 



Distribution from Local Aid Fund $ 262,382.87 

All Other 4,243.00 

Total Estimated Receipts $ 453,335.87 

Overestimate, State Parks (1965) 331.73 

Appropriations voted- to be taken 

from Available Funds 346,037.91 

Total, Estimated Receipts and Expenditures $ 799,705.51 

Net Amount to be raised by Taxation 1, 330, 597.10 

$ 2,130,302.61 



Total Valuation: 

Personal Property $ 2,181,060 at $35 $ 76,337.10 

Real Estate 35,836,000 at $35 1,254,260.00 

$38,017,060 $1,330,597.10 



Number of Acres of Land Assessed 7,310.58 

Number of Dwelling Houses Assessed 1,138 

Tax Rate per thousand: 

School Rate $24.09 

General Rate 10.91 $35.00 



86 




Hartw ell Farm 



Protection of Lives and Property 

FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENTS 
Leo J. Algeo, Chief 



I hereby submit my report for the Fire and Police 
Departments for the year ending December 31, 1966. 

Fire Department 

The Department answered a total of 247 calls as list- 
ed below: 



Buildings 


8 


Chimney 


1 


Brush and Woods 


54 


Motor Vehicle 


13 


Electric wires down or 




arcing 


8 



87 



Motor Vehicle Accidents 49 

Town Dump 24 

False Alarm 1 

Miscellaneous 89 

Total 247 

The building fires consisted of six houses and two 
cottages and the total estimated loss in these fires was 
$23,200.00. This was a drop of $14,200.00 in the total 
estimated loss in similar fires for 1965. 

The Fire Department inspected and issued permits for 
the following installations during 1966: 

Oil tanks, outside 15 

Oil tanks, inside 11 

Oil burners 43 

Total 69 

This represented an increase of 31 inspections in 
this category. This was due primarily to a stepped up 
program of enforcement of applicable regulations. 

Inspection of Nursing Homes have been made every 
three months in accordance with State Laws. 

Fire drills were conducted at all Lincoln Schools 
including our Nursery Schools. 

Our fifteen fire alarm boxes were inspected and 
tested every month to assure proper working condition. 

1,042 permits were given for outside burning. 

26 permits were issued for blasting and one permit 
for the removal of two 2,000 gallon gas tanks. 

The program of daily, weekly and monthly inspections 
of our equipment continues. 

During 1966 Firefighter James Casella satisfactorily 
completed the following courses: 

A 10-hour course on Fire Prevention and In- 
spection at the Central Massachusetts Fire 
Training Academy, Framingham. 

88 



A 10-hour course on Pre-Fire Planning at 
the Academy. 

A 3-day course. Fire Training, at the 
Massachusetts Civil Defense Academy in 
Topsfield. 

On June 10, 1966, Firefighter Joseph Bozak graduated 
from the Central Massachusetts Fire Training Academy aft- 
er satisfactorily completing four weeks of intensive 
training in fire techniques and fire science. Bozak 
was a member of the first class to receive a complete 
four weeks training at the Academy. 

Both Casella and Bozak attended a two-day course on 
Forcible Entry at the Fire Academy in October. 

Firefighter Bozak also successfully completed a Red 
Cross Standard First Aid Course given at the Waltham 
Auxiliary Police Headquarters during the fall. 

A schedule was set up which permitted our two regular 
Firefighters, Casella and Bozak, to work together four 
hours per week. This allowed them the opportunity to 
visit such places as public buildings, nursing homes, 
and the schools for familiarization and pre-planning pur- 
poses. They were able to inspect and operate the equip- 
ment and in cooperation with the callmen and their spring 
drill sessions, 8000 feet of hose was inspected, tested 
and marked. 

Firefighter Casella continues to serve as Department 
Inspector. He makes all the inspections on oil burning 
equipment and issues the permits. He issues permits 
for blasting and makes the quarterly inspections of Nurs- 
ing homes. He is also doing most of the necessary re- 
pair work on the fire alarm system. 

There were seven drill sessions conducted during 
1966 for the thirty-one members of the department. These 
drills included the use of all our equipment, plus fam- 
iliarization visits to the Storrow House, Farrington Mem- 
orial and the Nike Base. 

Police Department 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 145 

89 



Arrests by State Police 11 

Violations of Motor Vehicle 

Law recorded 344 

Warnings issued 214 

Court summonses 

issued 130 

Total fines paid $1,695.00 

Motor Vehicle accident report: 

Accidents reported 213 

Occupants injured 171 

Occupants killed 5 

Following is a partial list of other activities of 
the Police Department: 

Appearances in Court 66 

Emergency calls, other than 

Motor Vehicle accidents 62 

Checks made at vacant 

houses 3,665 

Checks made at business 

places 5,333 

Summonses served for 
other Police Depart- 
ments 429 

Burglaries investigated 31 
Estimated loss $10,525.00 

Larcenies investigated 44 

Estimated loss $ 2,664.75 

Armed Robbery investigated 1 

Dog complaints investigated 128 

Motor Vehicle registration 
numbers checked for owner- 
ship or stolen record 525 

Miscellaneous items 

recorded 3,107 



90 



The Police Department has continued to make in- 
creased efforts in the area of traffic control. With 
the advent of the "No Fix" ticket on January 1, and the 
purchase of our radar timer in May our efforts in this 
direction were greatly enhanced. We no longer issue 
written warnings from the Department as we have in the 
past. Every violation recorded during 1966 has been 
marked as a warning and sent to the Registry for possi- 
ble action or marked complaint and taken to the District 
Court for action. The figures above showing 214 opera- 
tors reported to the Registry and 130 summoned to Court 
reflects our efforts to control traffic in Lincoln. 

During the past year some residents have suffered 
heavy losses to "housebreakers". Very little of the 
"loot" taken has been recovered to date. "Housebreak- 
ing" in the suburban areas has become a major problem. 
I would like to urge all residents to be observant about 
your neighborhood and report all suspicious persons and 
vehicles to us. Be suspicious of strangers and please 
try to help us. 

On March 14, 1966, Charles E. Doyle was appointed a 
Patrolman to fill the vacancy created by Frank Gordon's 
resignation. On April 20, 1966, Walter R. Carew was 
appointed a Patrolman to fill the position created by 
the Town Meeting in March. Both of these men have at- 
tended six-week courses at the Massachusetts State Police 
Academy in Framingham. During this training the men are 
required to live at the Academy. Doyle graduated in 
October and Carew in December. Each was in a class with 
a total enrollment of 48 and each placed third in their 
class in academic achievement. Both of these men are 
now enrolled at Northeastern University where they at- 
tend classes in Criminal Law once a week. 

In February Patrolman Richard Hallett satisfactorily 
completed a college grade course in Criminal Law and Pro- 
cedure, given by the State Department of Education, Divi- 
sion of University Extension at Harvard. 

Patrolman Michael J. McHugh successfully completed 
a 4-day Police Training Course in June at the Massachu- 
setts Civil Defense Training Academy in Topsfield. 

On May 23, 1966, a 1:00 A. M. to 9:00 A. M. shift 
was added to our schedule and we thereby went on a 24- 

91 



hour patrol basis. 

The Selectmen have been requested to appoint a Ser- 
geant in order that an Officer may be on duty at all 
times. 

Our "Steamer" weathervane is once again in place on 
the cupola of the fire and police station. The original 
model proved to be too heavy and has been replaced. I 
would like all to know that these weathervanes were the 
combined efforts of Bill King and Bob Booth of Old Con- 
cord Road, Ernie Johnson, Grasshopper Lane, and Everett 
Black of Page Road with no expense to the town. These 
men have spent a sizable amount of cash and a great amount 
of time on this project and we are most grateful to them 
for a very attractive weathervane. 



92 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr., Director 



Civil Defense activity is centered largely around a 
program designed to provide the greatest possible pro- 
tection to the largest number of people in the shortest 
possible time. In addition, the program is designed to 
help provide for continuity of civil government in any 
emergency. Protection from the heat and blast effects 
of a nuclear weapon detonated within, say, 20 miles, is 
not possible without the expenditure of vast sums of mon- 
ey. However, a weapon detonated anywhere on this con- 
tinent would produce radioactive fallout which would be a 
real threat to our lives. Protection from fallout does 
not require much money, but it does require action. 

In the Town, five buildings have been classed by the 
Army Corps of Engineers as having a protection factor high 
enough so that they may be licensed as public shelters. 
Three of these have been licensed and will be marked and 
stocked with emergency supplies during the coming year. 
Application for licenses for the other two buildings have 
been requested, but have not, so far, been granted by the 
building owners. 

A Program Paper has been, submitted to the Office of 
Civil Defense, outlining our present status and plans for 
the future. Approval of this document will make the Town 
eligible for Federal assistance in the form of surplus 
property and matching funds for certain purposes. 

Working in conjunction with the school administration, 
a plan has been developed for the orderly evacuation of 
the schools, if this should ever become necessary. 

Three men have volunteered to help us with our radio 
communications, thereby affording some relief to Del Keily 
and John McLellan, who have carried the whole burden for 
ten years. Three men have expressed an interest in tak- 
ing a Shelter Manager's course, and should do so in Janu- 
ary of 1967. I have completed a 30-hour course in Civil 
Defense Management, which has already been most useful to 
me. 



93 



Emphasis during the coming year will be on the shelter 
program. It must be understood that there are so few 
buildings in Lincoln with a sufficient protection factor 
for licensing as public shelters that, in the last analy- 
sis, the protection of his family is the responsibility 
of each homeowner. 

I am asking the Town for enough money this year to 
take the first step in moving the emergency generator at 
the Fire & Police Station to a protected position below 
grade and to provide an adequate fuel supply for it. 

It should be noted that, effective March 1, 1967, 
there will be a change in the emergency signals given 
over the fire alarm whistle. The attack signal will be 
a series of short blasts, repeated several times. This 
signal will be used only in case of an actual attack on 
the United States . A three to five minute steady blast 
of the whistle is to be used as an "Alert" signal for a 
local disaster, such as a tornado. In either case, fur- 
ther instructions will be broadcast over the Emergency 
Broadcast System station for this area, WBZ (1030 k.c). 

The greatest deficiency in Civil Defense in Lincoln 
is in personnel. We need volunteers to train as radio- 
logical monitors and as shelter managers, and we need 
licensed radio operators. 

With the support of the Town, an effective program 
is feasible. We may never need it, but it seems short- 
sighted not to do our best. 



94 




Donaldson House 



Health and Welfare 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Gordon A. Donaldson, 
Abigail D. Avery 
Pierre Dreyfus, M. D, 



M, 



Chairman 



This year the Board has been particularly concerned 
with the health problems resulting from the continued 
growth of the Town, the development of the National Park 
in North Lincoln, the effect of the Social Security Act, 
Titles 18 and 19, and more recently, the implications of 
the Mental Health Act of Massachusetts. These changes 
have resulted in continued critical surveillance of land 
subdivisions and building lot sites, protection of swamp 
and low-lands, development of new Dump facilities neces- 
sitated by the National Park, implementation of Medicare 
and Medicaid benefits to those eligible, and exploration 
of the effects of State- supported clinics for the mental- 
ly ill. 



95 



Appointments were made and consisted of Mrs. David 
Garrison, Agent; Mr. William Davis, Burial Agent; Dr. 
Alden Russell, Inspector of Slaughtering; and Mr. Philip 
B. Martin, Inspector of Animals. Licenses were granted 
as follows: garbage transportation,!; piggeries, 1; sale 
of methyl alcohol, 2; massage, 1; victualers, 2; rest homes, 
2; nursery schools, 3; day camps, 3. 

As decreed by law, communicable diseases are record- 
ed in the Town Report. Although some laxity persists 
among physicians in reporting these diseases, the follow- 
ing have been noted: chickenpox, 16; German measles, 9; 
measles, 1; mumps, 12; streptococcus pharyngitis, 37; 
and dog-bite, 7. With the advent of measles vaccine, 
now available to all, this disease may be eliminated in 
the future. A single case of meningococcus meningitis, 
developing in a school teacher, who lived out of town, 
proved fatal. Immediate school contacts were provided 
with a prophylactic course of sulf a-therapy, lasting a 
total of five days. Monthly reports from the Middlesex 
County Sanatorium were received on all pulmonary tuber- 
culosis contacts or suspects. No new active cases were 
reported. 

Various clinics, generously supported by the Pierce 
Fund, were held as usual. The monthly Well-Child Con- 
ference, conducted by Dr. John Davies, received 121 
visits from children ranging in age from 3 months to 7 
years. Small-pox vaccination, triple vaccine (diphther- 
ia-tetanus-whooping cough) , measles vaccine, and Sabin 
oral polio vaccine were given when indicated. A com- 
plete physical examination was done on each child and Dr. 
Davies provided advice on physical and emotional defects, 
on diet, and on behavior problems. When indicated, re- 
ferrals to doctors in the various specialties were sug- 
gested. In the early months of the school year, the 
Dental clinic, conducted by William H. Tingey, provided 
a screening examination of the teeth of all children in 
Hartwell, Smith, and Brooks Schools. Two hundred thirty- 
four children were referred to their family dentist for 
treatment or orthodontia. No requests for special fin- 
ancial assistance in the treatment of dental disease were 
made to the- Pierce Fund. 

Annually, the Dog Rabies Clinic is held on the first 
Saturday in May in the Town Barn. Only 234 dog owners 

96 



took advantage of this service. This year, for the 
first time, the Board offered a vaccine which is effect- 
ive for two years and is considerably safer than the one- 
year vaccine previously used. Rabies is rare in Massa- 
chusetts, but there has been some recent increase noted 
in dogs and in a number of different wild animals found 
in this area. The Board strongly urges the townspeople 
to take advantage of the rabies immunization clinic, or 
have their dogs innoculated by private veterinarians. 
The cost of the two-year serum is $1.50 per dog. 

Recently, the Town ' s regulations pertaining to sew- 
age disposal and drainage have been up-dated to conform 
to 'the new State regulations (Article XI) . This law 
stipulated that "no person or firm shall engage in the 
construction, alteration, installation, or repair of any 
individual sewage disposal system without first obtaining 
a Disposal Works Installer's Permit from the Board of 
Health". These formal permit applications are now avail- 
able at the Town House, and should be properly completed 
before any construction is undertaken. 

In the near future, the mental health facilities 
available to the Town will be greatly amplified by the 
establishment of one of the State's 37 Community Mental 
Health Centers at the Emerson Hospital. A Comprehen- 
sive Community Mental Health Program is being organized 
for the area. This program simply coordinates the work 
of several agencies which are already serving our com- 
munity; the Walden Clinic, the Emerson Hospital, the Min- 
ute-Man Association for Retarded Children, and the Mental 
Health Association'. Family Service, the Red Cross, and 
the Concord Community Chest will also have facilities in 
the so-called Community Agencies Building. The Federal 
Government has provided a Grant that will pay 42% of the 
construction cost of this new building, and the remain- 
der will be. procured from private contributions. Under 
the aegis of the Mental Health Association of Central 
Middlesex, Inc., a Mental Health Planning Council has 
been formed by citizens from the ten towns in our area. 
Lincoln's representatives, appointed by the Board of 
Health, will share in these vital days of planning for 
the education and care of the mentally ill in the com- 
munity. In the meantime, the Board of Health will con- 
tinue to support the Walden Child Guidance Clinic of Con- 
cord. The previous formula of 40C per capita, to be 

97 



taken from taxes, will be provided as Lincoln's share in 
the support of this clinic. We are continuing to ex- 
plore the possibility of obtaining Pierce Fund support 
to provide help for Lincoln families unable to meet the 
cost of diagnosis and treatment at the Walden Clinic. 

The Social Security Act of 1966 provides Federal 
financial support for home-care programs conducted by 
public health nursing organizations. In order to quali- 
fy for Medicare and Medicaid support, certain specifica- 
tions within the Act must be met by the agencies. One 
of these requires that a fully qualified Public Health 
nurse must be available to supervise the program. With 
the towns of Acton, Carlisle, Concord, Maynard, and Stow, 
Lincoln has successfully applied for a Federal grant to 
support such a supervisor, and we have been fortunate in 
securing Miss Virginia Whitney, an eminently qualified 
person. Her duties will be those of supervisor for the 
nurses working in the involved towns. In Lincoln, this 
service is presently provided by the Home-Nursing Pro- 
gram, based at the Emerson Hospital. The governmental 
grant covering Miss Whitney's salary is for one year, 
possibly two; and thereafter the involved towns must 
share in the financial support. We believe that this 
will provide improved care not only for individuals fall- 
ing within the Medicare or Medicaid categories, but also 
for other patients requiring home-nursing care. The 
fee for a home visit has been set at $6.50. 

Again, our many volunteers have made it possible for 
the Board and its agent, Mrs. Garrison, to carry on clin- 
ics and activities throughout the year. We publicly 
thank them all for their help, including Mrs. Richard 
Rosane, Mrs. David Ammen, Mrs. John Crawford, Mrs. Ches- 
ter d'Autremont, and Mrs. John French. Mrs. Stanley 
Tead, who retired after six years of devoted volunteer 
work in the school health program, is greatly missed by 
both children and staff. 



98 



WALDEN GUIDANCE ASSOCIATION 
Stephen E. Braude, Treasurer 



AREA SERVED ; Walden Clinic is now serving the com- 
munities of Concord, Lincoln, Acton, Carlisle and May- 
nard. This area will eventually be expanded to include 
the same area currently served by the Emerson Hospital. 

FACILITIES; The Clinic is still housed in the 
Wright Tavern in Concord, but will move into the planned 
Community Agencies Building at Emerson Hospital when this 
is built and ready for occupancy sometime early in 1968. 
The building will be financed entirely by private and 
Federal funds, and no part of the budget of the Walden 
Guidance Association, Inc. will be used for construction. 
The building, when ready, will house the out-patient 
section of the new Community Health Center. Out-patient 
services for this Mental Health Center will be provided 
by Walden Clinic. 

SOURCE OF FUNDS ; Operations of the Clinic are 
financed by a combination of patient fees, State funds, 
tax monies from the communities served and gifts from 
individuals and foundations. Last year expenses were 
shared by; Municipalities - 20%, Fees - 20%, State Funds - 
35%, Concord Community Chest - 12%. The remaining 13% 
was obtained from miscellaneous sources, including gifts 
and contributions. 

SERVICES; The Clinic now serves emotionally dis- 
turbed adults, adolescents and children for diagnostic 
evaluation and treatment. Within the limitations of 
available staff and time, all patients who apply are 
treated irrespective of their ability to pay in full for 
services. Those considered able to pay full private 
psychiatric fees are generally referred to private psychi- 
atrists after diagnostic tests and evaluation have been 
completed. Therefore, most patients receiving treatment 
at the Clinic pay fees scaled according to income and 
other considerations. Since one year's treatment for 
one patient can cost the Clinic up to $2,400.00, most 
families are able to meet only a small proportion of this 
cost. Fees collected average 20% of cost of service. 



99 



Funds received from all sources are pooled and used 
for treatment of all patients irrespective of domicile 
within the area served. There appears to be a wide 
fluctuation from year to year in the number of patients 
from any one of the communities. 

STAFF : Demand for services still exceeds the 
availability of staff or funds. There is a substantial 
shortage of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychiatric 
social workers and more staff is definitely needed. We 
hope that the creation of the new Community Mental Health 
Center at Emerson Hospital will put us in a more advan- 
tageous competitive position for the recruitment of pro- 
fessional staff. 

CONCLUSION; Within its present limitations tY\e 
Clinic is attempting to meet the most urgent needs for 
the treatment of emotionally disturbed patients who are 
unable to avail themselves of private facilities, and 
who reside within the areas served. We shall make 
every effort to continue asking for only 40 cents per 
capita in annual tax support from the local communities. 
We greatly appreciate the help, cooperation and support 
of the Selectmen, Boards of Health, School Committees, 
other town boards and of the residents of the area. A 
special vote of thanks also to the Directors of the Con- 
cord Community Chest, who have supported the activities 
of the Clinic since its inception seven years ago. 



100 






INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Philip B. Martin 



The following animals are under the rules and regula- 
tions of the Department of Livestock Disease Control of 
the Department of Agriculture. I have supplied them 
with a list of owners (on whose premises the animals are 
kept) and the numbers and kinds of these animals in Lin- 
coln. 

No. of dairy cows over 2 years 4 

No. of dairy heifers 1-2 years 

No. of dairy heifer calves under 

1 year 4 

No. of dairy bulls 

No. of beef cattle 46 

No. of goats 8 

No. of horses (1 donkey) 117 

No. of sheep 17 

No. of swine 216 

As of October 1, 1966, to January 1, 1967, eleven 
dog bites were reported during that period. Dogs are 
quarantined and released at the end of ten days if no 
sign of rabies appears. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

M. Elizabeth Causer, Director 



The first responsibility of the public assistance 
agency is to meet the basic needs of individuals who are 
themselves unable to meet them, and, by providing neces- 
sary services, to assist persons in developing their cap- 
acity for self-maintenance to the fullest extent possible 
for them. 

The following Federal and State aided programs are 
now available to those in need: 

101 



Old Age Assistance - under which cash allowances 
are provided for elderly persons who are in need. In 
order to be eligible for assistance, a person must be 65 
years of age or over. 

Disability Assistance - under which assistance is 
provided for needy persons found to be permanently and 
totally disabled. In order to be eligible for assist- 
ance, a person must be 18 years of age or over. 

Aid to Families with Dependent Children - under 
which cash allowances are provided for children who are 
living in a home maintained by their father, mother, or 
other relative, when death, long term illness, or some 
other factor, has deprived the child of the normal sup- 
port or care of either his father or mother. 

Medicaid - Title XIX of the Social Security Act pro- 
vides for a new program of Medical Assistance sometimes 
called Medicaid. This new category which replaced the 
M. A. A. program provides for medical assistance to cer- 
tain persons in addition to the aged. This program be- 
came effective September 1, 1966. Basic eligibility re- 
quirements may be obtained at the Department of Public 
Welfare. 

Persons not eligible in any of the above categories 
are provided for under the General Relief Program. This 
program is not Federally aided. 

During the year 1966, the following cases were aided 
in the amount of $35,262.47. 

0. A. A. 10 

M. A. 15 

Federal and State receipts in support of these pro- 
grams amounted to $30,642.40. 



102 




DeNormandie Farm 



Planning and Public Works 

PLANNING BOARD 

Robert L. Allen, Chairman 
Morton B. Braun 
Warren R. Dwyer 
David L. Garrison 
Richard C. Reece 



It is no trick at all for a Town Planning Board to 
have a very busy time, month after month, without ever 
really doing any planning. There is much to do and 
little time. 



During 1966, the Planning Board made an effort to 
separate its immediate concerns (such as working with 
developers, examining plans, and holding hearings) from 
the long view of the Town as expressed in the By ' 70 
Plan. The plan itself, available in 1966 for the first 
time on a full-year basis, was the spur to separate the 
immediate from the future. The second Monday of each 

103 



month was held ready for routine Planning Board busi- 
ness; the fourth Monday was reserved (whenever possible) 
for what the Board considers to be its most important 
function: planning. 

The Board started the year with R. Langdon Wales 
as chairman and with Warren R. Dwyer as vice-chairman. 
Following the annual Town Meeting, Mr. Allen was elected 
chairman, with Mr. Wales as vice-chairman. Mr. Dwyer 
was named chairman of the Off Street Path Committee, 
while maintaining membership on the Planning Board. On 
June 1st, Mr. Wales resigned from the Board, and Richard 
Reece was named to an interim appointment to fill the 
Wales seat until the annual election on March 25, 1967. 
In a letter to Mr. Wales commending him for his service 

to the Town, the Planning Board said: " these in 

some total are what we know you have given in great 
measure to our town: Your leadership and perception,, 
your breadth of understanding and wise counsel, your un- 
usual capacity to retain and assimilate the facts, your 
hard work, your precise articulation and carefully honed 
points of view — and the joy of your friendship. These 
wonders we admire in you and have been better these years 
for the sharing. " 

Land Acquisition 

The Planning Board and the Conservation Commission 
submitted articles in the warrant of a special Town Meet- 
ing on November 28, 1966, for the purchase of the Brown- 
ing fields at the intersection of Weston and Conant Roads 
and the Warren swamp off Conant Road. The Town's affirm- 
ative vote was a fine first step on the By '70 Plan's land 
acquisition, program. 

Subdivisions 

The year ' s only single residence subdivision took 
place on what has been known as the Wheeler property on 
Bedford Road. An enlightened group of citizens organ- 
ized under the name of the Rural Land Foundation of Lin- 
coln, Inc., to. develop the approximately 100-acre tract 
in a way that would preserve much of the land for the 
Town in perpetuity. The Foundation intends to present 
approximately 50 acres to the Lincoln Land Trust. 



104 



All of the Town's area zoned for general residences 
was developed in 1966. The Maynide Corporation con- 
structed thirty- six two-bedroom apartments on Ridge Road 
in South Lincoln and twenty-one one, two and three-bed- 
room units were constructed* on the Todd Pond property. 

Refuse Disposal 

Lincoln is one of very few towns enjoying the dis- 
tinction of having its dump in a national park. The 
Park Service, believing the dump at Folly Pond to have 
little historical significance, has requested that it be 
closed, and the State Board of Health persists in label- 
ling it a health hazard and suggesting that an alterna- 
tive be found. During 1966, a representative of the 
Planning Board met regularly as a member of a committee 
of representatives from Waltham, Weston, Lexington, Bed- 
ford and Concord to investigate the possibilities of re- 
gional, cooperative refuse disposal. The committee has 
recommended in a written report that the towns form a 
regional refuse disposal board, and, through appropriate 
action, draft a detailed proposal for the creation and 
support of a regional incinerator that will be voted upon 
by the towns in 1968. The Planning Board looks to re- 
gional incineration as the only sensible permanent way 
to solve the problem. Because of the urgency of depart- 
ing Folly Pond, however, an interim dump site for sani- 
tary land fill has been selected to last from three to 
five years, when, it is hoped, a regional facility can 
assume the burden. 

On-Going Projects 

The South Lincoln Plan came a bit closer to realiza- 
tion with the clearing for parking of areas on both sides 
of the tracks along Lincoln Road. The Board is inter- 
ested in carrying out further provisions of the plan that 
calls for planned and moderate development of the South 
Lincoln Business District. 

The relocation of Route 2 continued to be of consid- 
erable interest to Lincoln. The results of a hearing on 
the placement of the new limited-access highway conducted 
last June by the Department of Public Works indicate, as 
far as can be ascertained, that the northern location, 
next to the Minute Man National Park, is the preferred 
location. 

105 



Moderate Income Housing , The Planning Board and the 
Selectmen created a committee to study the potential of 
moderate income housing in Lincoln. Its report is due 
in 1968. 

Off-Street Path . The Off-Street Path Committee, un- 
der Chairman Warren Dwyer, prepared a detailed plan for 
the path for presentation to the 1967 Annual Town Meeting, 
The path has been designed to permit safe foot or bicycle 
travel from the Town Library to the South Lincoln shop- 
ping district. 



The Planning Board welcomes this report as an oppor- 
tunity to extend thanks to its very valuable secretary, 
Elizabeth Snelling. The quality of her service to the 
Town is inspiring. Also this Planning Board, composed 
of transient-workers-in-the-city, knows well the value 
to the Town and the dedication to his work of Warren 
Flint, the executive secretary of Lincoln. 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 
Alan McClennen 
Henry B. Hoover 
James Jagger 
Hans Van Leer 

J. Lewis Cunningham, Associate Member 
John Pike, Associate Member 



Hearings were held on fourteen petitions during the 
year 1966. Set forth below is a summary of the peti- 
tions: 

February 16th — Robert H. Baldwin for a variance 
from Section VI. 9. 5 to permit the 
construction of a single family 
residence within twenty feet of the 
easterly side lot line on his lot, 

106 



which is Lot 13 of the Todd Pond 
development. GRANTED. 



March 16th — 



Robert H. Baldwin for a variance 
from Section VI C to allow an ac- 
cessory building, in this case a 
platform tennis court, to be loca- 
ted within one foot of the rear lot 
line of Lot #13, Todd Pond, such 
one foot being closer to the lot 
line than either twenty feet or the 
height of such accessory building. 
DENIED. 



At the same time, Mr. Baldwin ap- 
plied for a variance from Section 
VI C to allow an accessory building 
(detached garage) to be located 
within one foot of the rear lot line 
of Lot #19 at Todd Pond. DENIED. 



April 14th 



Sal Mitrano for a variance to allow 
an addition to a house on a non- 
conforming lot on 'Concord Road near 
Lake Walden. GRANTED. 



Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln 
for a variance to (1) permit cluster 
zoning on land located on Bedford 
Road, known as the Wheeler property; 
and (2) to eliminate frontage on 
Route 2 of Lot 9, as shown on plan 
of the Wheeler property development 
on file with the Planning Board. 
GRANTED. 



April 20th — 



A. Stuart Denholm for a variance to 
allow the construction of a dwelling 
on South Great Road with less than 
250 feet through the house from side 
lot line to side lot line. GRANTED. 



May 19th — 



Lincoln Development Corporation for 
a variance to allow a fifty foot 
frontage for Parcel #33A in the Todd 
Pond subdivision on a way dedicated 



107 



to public use, and access over said 
way in an R-l District from Todd 
Pond Road, a public way, to said 
Parcel #33A in an R-2 District. 
GRANTED. 



June 16th 



Aerospace Research, Inc. for per- 
mission to locate a mobile office 
trailer on land owned by Harry CooJc 
and adjacent to the town dump on 
Route 2A. GRANTED. 



Dr. Reed Harwood, for a variance of 
the zoning by-law to allow the con- 
struction of an addition to an ex- 
isting dwelling on South Great Road, 
such addition to extend within thir- 
ty-five feet of the side lot line. 
Since no one was present to repre- 
sent the applicant, no action was 
taken. 



October 20th — 



Robert G. Brownell and William G. 
Berkes, for (a) permission to cre- 
ate two lots out of three lots num- 
bered 31, 32, and 33, as shown on 
plan dated July 9, 1964; (b) for 
permission to allow construction of 
a building extending 'thirty feet in- 
to area of C-Open Space Conservation 
District in portion of one of the 
newly created lots; and (c) authori- 
zation to expunge from said plan the 
wording "Conservation Area #1 to be 
conveyed to Herbert Haessler, et ux, 
for conservation use only, construct- 
ion of small accessory buildings on- 
ly", and "Conservation Area #2 to be 
conveyed to David Navon, et ux, for 
conservation use only. Construct- 
ion of small accessory buildings on- 
ly", and in lieu thereof, is to be 
deeded to nominee of the owner. 
GRANTED. Modifications to the 
Special Permit originally granted on 
July 27, 1964. 



108 



Charles L. and Frances W. Gordon, 
for the re-issuance of a building 
permit for the construction of an 
enclosed porch on the rear of the 
house owned by them on Old Sudbury 
Road, said permit having been re- 
voked., GRANTED. 

Builders' Club of Lincoln, Inc. for 
renewal of permission to use build- 
ing on Lincoln Road in Lincoln (for- 
merly known as the South School) for 
meetings; primarily to be used by 
Soley Lodge, A. F. & A. M., for Mas- 
onic meetings, under Section X-3 of 
the* Zoning By-Law of the Town. 
GRANTED. 

November 17th — Charles L. Chiotelis of Brooks Road, 
for a variance to allow construct- 
ion of an addition to his present 
building that would extend to with- 
in 17 feet 6 inches of the side lot 
line. GRANTED. 



November 22nd -• 



(adjourned from November 17th) - 
Dr. Gordon D. Winchell for a "Special 
Use Permit" for continued use of the 
doctor's office in the dwelling on 
Lincoln Road formerly occupied by 
him. GRANTED. 



Dr. Gordon D. Winchell, for a vari- 
'ance to permit construction of a 
building to be used as a doctor's 
office on Concord Road near Farrar 
Road. GRANTED. 



109 



s> : 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, WIRING AND PLUMBING 

Ernest L. Johnson, Building Inspector 

William M. Dean, Wiring Inspector 

Daniel J. Murphy, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 



Building Permits Issued during 1966: 79 

Additions-Alterations- Conversions 25 

Buildings Demolished 2 

Permits Reissued 2 

New Residential 32 

9-unit Apartment Building 1 

Classroom Studio (DeCordova) 1 

Residential Garages-Carports 5 

Public Works Building - 

Pumping Station 1 

Swimming Pools 2 

Non-Residential 7 

Greenhouse 1 

FEES COLLECTED $2,272.12 

Wiring Permits Issued during 1966: 153 

FEES COLLECTED $1,078.30 

Plumbing Permits Issued during 1966: 101 

FEES COLLECTED $ 835.00 



110 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Robert A. Spence, Chairman 
H. Arnold MacLean 
James DeNormandie 

A portion of the new section has been lined out for 
new lot bounds. 

The usual routine maintenance was performed during 
the year. 

There were 21 interments in 1966. 

The Commissioners wish to express their appreciation 
for the assistance and cooperation given them by officers 
and employees of the Town during the past year. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Frank H. Cande, Administrator 

I hereby submit my annual report on Public Works for 
the year ending December 31, 1966. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Department is being developed into a well rounded 
service organization where manpower, time, and equipment 
are being utilized advantageously in carrying out the 
planned work. 

During the past year, two new employees came into 
the department after considerable time spent in search- 
ing. Edward Ro chin sky, Waltham, came to work for the 
Department in November with the qualifications of an all 
round equipment operator. Kenneth Jones, Wayland, 
joined the Department in December, and is slated to 
spend much of his time in the Park Division. Ken is a 
graduate of Stockbridge School at the University where 
he majored in Park Management. At present, he is tak- 
ing a course on "Tree Problem Diagnosis" evenings at the 



111 



Waltham Field Station. 

With our two pluses, we had two minuses. Joe Gil- 
bert retired in September after serving the Town for 30 
years. We extend to Joe our good wishes for an enjoy- 
able retirement. An excellent young employee, Richard 
Campobasso, found it necessary to serve his country and 
left for the U. S. Army in November. Richard is being 
assigned to the Army Postal Service and we extend our 
best wishes for a gratifying tour of duty. 

During last year, a greater work performance was ob- 
tained through the use of two and three man work crews 
with one acting as a crew chief. Although the crews are 
flexible, a man is assigned work according to his quali- 
fications. 

The preventative maintenance program on Town owned 
equipment continues to keep costs down, thus preventing 
large repair bills. This work is ably handled by our 
mechanic. 

ENGINEERING 

The purchase of a surveying instrument allowed for 
accurate installation of culverts, manholes, road grades, 
ball fields, soccer field, and correction of drainage 
problems. This instrument greatly reduced the consult- 
ing engineer fees for initial and repeat visits. 

Many hours of engineering time was spent with the 
School Department and Recreation Committee and Landscape 
Committee. 

PARK DIVISION 

Much time was spent during the spring months on the 
development of recreational areas. The ballfield at the 
elementary school complex was completed by grading^ and 
seeding. Grading, harrowing, and seeding took a great 
deal of time at the Di Perna property in the construction 
of two general play areas. 

An all-weather service road to the hockey pond in 
Pierce Park was developed. 



112 



The installation of underground drainage on wet land 
bordering the hockey pond proved satisfactory. 

The contractual arrangements for the mowing and trim- 
ming at the school and park property has continued to 
prove satisfactory. 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

The greatest time spent in the Cemeteries was during 
May in anticipation of Memorial Day. Cleaning up the 
winter debris, trimming trees, and improving the entrance 
way were routine matters. Grass cutting time was re- 
duced 50% by the use of the new tractor mower. However, 
grass trimming around the 'stone markers is in need of a 
more efficient method than with hand clippers. 

A vault at the Cemetery behind the Town Hall was re- 
paired. The area below the wall at the foot of the hill 
was improved by the removal of brush and poison ivy. 

The lot markers for the new section at the Lexington 
Road Cemetery will be installed during the coming year 
since the initial staking out has been done. 

A cross check of lot sizes with the plot plan 
is continuing so as to have more accurate records. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Outside of routine sweeping and patching, mowing of 
roadsides, work of improvement did not start until July. 
Although fewer streets were worked on, greater emphasis 
was placed on care of the "total right-of-way". 

Tower Road from Route 117 to Lincoln Road was im- 
proved. This street had many critical areas with road 
widths varying from 12 to 17 feet in width. Much of the 
obstruction was due to stones, stumps, rock walls, brush, 
trees, and poorly placed electric light poles. With the 
splendid cooperation from the residents on Tower Road and % 
the utility companies, these hazards were greatly reduced. 
The road was leveled prior to applying an oil seal. 
Dressing the roadside will be done this spring and should 
complete this project. 



113 



Old County Road from the Lexington line to Trapelo 
Road was leveled for better drainage and then oil sealed. 

Codman Road was "hot topped" under the Chapter 90 
funds and should last for many years. With the com- 
pletion of the roadside this spring, this street should 
be one of the loveliest in Town. Some brush removal 
and thinning should allow for better development of ex- 
isting trees. The stone walls are in need of some re- 
building. 

Concord Road from 117 to the Wayland Town Line has 
been 90% completed. Only the installation of a rumble 
strip and some more tree planting is needed. The widen- 
ing of the curve and installation of a new drainage sys- 
tem under it greatly reduced this traffic hazard. The 
removal of eight to twelve inches of a sand accumulation 
on the immediate road shoulders should help in prolonging 
the life of the old maples through an improved air-water 
circulation system of the root zone. 

Other activities within the Highway Division were 
the installation of two parking lots at the South Lincoln 
shopping area; the removal of the old telephone building 
and transforming the area into a school parking lot; the 
development of a service road to the well house; cooper- 
ative venture with the Richardson Drug Company in the 
development of additional parking facilities with an exit 
on to Ridge Road. Also the installation of a new sep- 
tic system on the former Campobasso property in coopera- 
tion with the Water Commissioners. 

WATER DIVISION 

The functions of this division are being programmed 
through Public Works. During the coming year it is ex- 
pected a much greater utilization of manpower and equip- 
ment will take place through pooling of resources. Co- 
operation during the past year was excellent. 

EQUIPMENT 

The department received during the year two new dump 
trucks, tractor mower and post hole digger. All proved 
most valuable in our ever increasing work load. One of 
the old dump trucks was retired to the winter sanding 
program. This will allow us to have several more years 

114 



use of this piece of equipment. 

Our heavy duty loader is feeling the effects of old 
age. Its efficiency is dropping every year. Although 
"breakdown time" was kept to less than a days work time, 
they were numerous and costly. This type of machine is 
the backbone of our mechanized program. 

The road grader was spared heavy work this past year 
and used only when absolutely necessary. A newer, yet 
smaller size, grader would be of great help in our road 
building and maintenance program. 

SNOW REMOVAL 

The last two weeks in December proved heavy on de- 
mand in time but no equipment breakdown of consequence 
resulted as was the case during early 1966. 

A revised schedule for snow and ice removal was 
mapped. With eight plows available per route, the mile- 
age averages seven each way. This allows for quicker 
and more thorough clearing time. However, the sander 
situation is different and should be improved. The 
present three sanders each cover a 20-mile route and if 
one should break down the other two have to pick up the 
additional mileage. At present, the most precious time 
is at the start of the storm and it takes approximately 
3% hours to completely cover the entire town. 

In conclusion, I want to take this opportunity to 
thank all Boards, Committees and Departments for having 
the opportunity to work closely with them during the 
past year on mutual problems. 



115 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Russell P. Mahan, Chairman 
Alan McClennen 
Stuart B. Avery, Jr. 



August 20th of this year was an historic day for the 
Lincoln Water Department. On that day the valves were 
opened and water from the new TOWER ROAD WELL began to 
flow into the Town mains. 

The well itself, which was constructed in late 1965, 
was test pumped in January at full capacity for ten days 
to determine "safe yield". As soon as the frost was out 
of the ground a cement block building was erected and 
work started on the actual installation of pump and motor. 
A decision was made to power the pump with' an internal 
combustion engine run on natural gas rather than the more 
conventional electric motor usually employed. Several 
factors indicated that this would be a wise decision: 

1. Operating costs were estimated to be lower with 
natural gas than electricity. 

2. With the "Great Northeast Blackout" still fresh 
in mind, we were anxious to have another source 
of power in addition to the electricity and gas- 
oline power available at the Sandy Pond pumping 
station. 

3. The engine and associated controls could be de- 
livered several months sooner on a natural gas 
installation than on an all electric installation, 

After five months of operation on natural gas the 
Water Commissioners are not entirely happy with the motor 
selection. We had hoped to have a completely automated 
system, but continuing problems with the engine controls 
have made it necessary to spend more hours tending the 
new equipment than was usually required on the older elec- 
tric installation at Sandy Pond. It is a problem that 
has number one priority with the Commissioners at this 
time. 

Townspeople seem to appreciate the improved quality 
of the unchlorinated well water and are quick to notice 

116 



the change when on occasion it becomes necessary to shift 
back to the old pumps at Sandy Pond. The long spell of 
low water at Sandy Pond has encouraged the growth of some 
forms of algae, which, while harmless, tends to give an 
unpleasant taste to water when chlorine is added. 

The policy of flushing all mains and testing all 
hydrants once a year was continued in 1966. Four sub- 
standard hydrants were replaced and several others were 
"overhauled" and new parts installed where necessary. 

No water use restrictions were imposed on customers 
in 1966 and a record 135 million gallons were pumped. 
As a result of this expanded water use, an increase in 
hydrant rental fees, and 47 new service connections, the 
Department is entering the new year with a surplus of 
$29,720, - a large portion of which will be spent on need- 
ed improvements in 1967. 

Late in the summer the old six-inch line on Route 2, 
between Bedford Road and Brooks Road, was replaced with 
2600 feet of eight-inch cement-asbestos pipe. This im- 
portant link in the water system was funded from an ex- 
isting balance in the water mains account, so no addition- 
al borrowing was necessary. 

At a special Town Meeting in November the Town voted 
to acquire the Campobasso property adjoining the Town well 
site. The old sewage system at Campobasso' s was moved 
outside the 400-foot circle of the well field and replaced 
with a modern septic tank and leaching field. 

This project was an excellent example of the coopera- 
tion within the new Town Public Works Department. Mr. 
Cande supervised the project and coordinated the efforts 
of the outside contractor and the Town employees. The 
access road into the new town well was also laid out and 
constructed by the Town Public Works Department. Co- 
operation between various Town labor forces has worked out 
well and led to better utilization of men and equipment. 

Mr. John Gilbert is to be commended on his interest, 
energy and long hours with the new equipment. The inno- 
vations at the new pumping station have been a source of 
both satisfaction and frustration. Mr. Gilbert should 
be congratulated for his ability to diagnose the many prob- 

117 



lems and improvise equipment for the solution when re- 
placement parts and professional talent were not readily 
available. 



WATER DEPARTMENT STATISTICS for 1966 

Pipe in use (miles) 35.55 

Hydrants in use 308 

Gates in use 353 

Blow-offs in use 27 

Pressure ( P. S. I.) 40-100 

Volume pumped (Gallons) 135,713,400 

Services added 47 

Services renewed 9 

Services in use 1,164 

Meters in use 1,189 



118 



SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE 

Secor D. Browne 
Malcolm L. Donaldson 
Donald J. Natoli 
John A. Pike 

Eleanor L. Wilson, Secretary- 
Win throp B. Walker, Chairman 



FINAL REPORT 

With the acceptance of the Brooks School and the Hart- 
well School addition by the Lincoln School Committee on Monday, 
December 5, 1966, the School Building Needs Committee authorized 
by the Town Meeting on March 20, 1961, has completed its charge 
from the Town. 



The financial report is summarized below 
APPROPRIATIONS 
Purpose 



1. Building Committee Needs 

2. Land - 16.83 Acres $50,000 

1,000 

.35 Acres 1,050 

- 1.33 Acres 4,000 

18.51 Acres $56,050 

3. Building & Equip. 100,000 

100,000 

700,000 

$900,000 

95,000 

$995,000 

TOTAL OF APPROPRIATIONS 



Amount 



Source 



56,050 



995,000 
$1,056,050 



3onds 
Free Cash 
Free Cash 
Free Cash 



Voted 



$ 5,000 Free Cash 3/20/61 



6/4/62 
6/4/62 
6/4/62 
6/4/62 



Stab. Fund 6/4/62 
Accelerated 

State 6/4/62 
Bond Issue 6/4/62 

Bond Issue 6/3/64 



••••*•••••••• 



COST ANALYSIS OF SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT 



Advertising 
Insurance 
Architect 
Building Contract 
Equipment 



25.90 

1,676.43 

79,991.82 

841,124.31 

76,887.46 

999,705.92 



(cont. ) 
119 



School Needs Committee $ 4,745.50 

$994,960.42 

Balance Unspent 39. 58 

TOTAL APPROPRIATION FOR 

CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT $995,000.00 



The School Building Needs Committee wishes to thank all 
Df the very many townspeople who have given unstintingly of their 
time in advisory capacities. "We wish to express our deep grati- 
tude to Mr. Filbin and to the School Committee for their patience 
and confidence throughout the long period we have worked together 
to bring to realization the dream of a school plant for Lincoln 
in which the educational needs of Lincoln children can be ful- 
filled at the high standard accepted by the Town. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 

John Ouincy Adams 

Paul Brooks 

James DeNormandie 

Edith Henderson 

Walter Van Dorn 

Hans Van >Leer 



In 1966, the Conservation Commission gathered momen- 
tum in its primary objective of implementing the Town's 
By-70 Program. Working closely with the Selectmen, Plan- 
ning Board and Finance Committee, we proposed at the 
March, 1966, town meeting, and it was voted to acquire 
12 acres bordering Sandy Pond for $30,000 and 20.21 acres 
of swamp land abutting Lincolnsf ield for $9,000. Similar- 
ly at the November, 1966, town meeting we proposed and it 
was voted to acquire 19 acres of swamp and highland form- 
ing part of the Valley Brook headwaters for $20,000 and 
20 acres of open space along Conant and Weston Roads well- 
known as Browning Fields for $68,850. 

Applications for State and Federal Assistance have 
been filed on all the above except for the swamp land ad- 
joining Lincolnsf ield. No outside assistance was re- 
quested on the latter because the Town wanted to maintain 
sole control over the usage of this land. 

As State and Federal approvals of town applications 
for grants in aid were received, cash requisitions were 
submitted as follows: 

State Aid Federal Aid (Total Cost) 

DiPerna $10,875 $21,750 $43,500 

Lincolnsf ield $6,125 $12,250 $24,500 

Sandy Pond (Tarbell) $ 7,500 $ 15,000 $ 30,000 

$24,500 $49,000 $98,000 

Similar requisitions will be submitted for assistance 
on the following acquisitions as, if, and to the extent 
approved by the indicated authorities. 



121 



State Aid Federal Aid ( Total Cost ) 

Valley Brook Swamp $ 5,000 $10,000 $20,000 

Browning Fields $ 17,212 $ 34,425 $ 68,850 

$22,212 $44,425 $88,850 



It is particularly noteworthy that the two latest 
acquisitions were the first land purchases for conserva- 
tion purposes financed in part by long term obligations. 
This ability to borrow for conservation along with State 
and Federal assistance programs encourage us to pursue the 
objectives of the By-70 Program as quickly as possible. 

As the activities of the Conservation Commission in- 
crease, efforts are being made to improve organizational 
procedures. This year's proposal to increase our budget 
to $8,000 is largely the result of efforts to simplify the 
procedure of requisitioning needed engineering and apprai- 
sal work and to identify these expenditures with their 
essential purpose. Last year, close to $4,000 was spent 
or authorized out of the Selectmen's budget for these pur- 
poses. The indicated $4,000 increase for these services 
reflects the step-up in our activities. 

Although it is impossible to state which of the land 
parcels identified or implied in the By-70 Program will 
be prepared for consideration at the 1968 town meeting, 
it is hoped that momentum will not be lost so that the 
By-70 target date will continue to be realistic. 



122 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Bradford Cannon 

Donald P. Donaldson 

Edith Henderson 

Constantin A. Pertzoff 

William N. Swift 

Jeanne Healey, Secretary 

William M. Preston, Chairman 

The Lincoln Land Conservation Trust is a non-profit 
organization, supported by membership dues and voluntary 
contributions, whose principal purpose is to preserve the 
open- space character of the Town. We work closely with 
the Town Conservation Commission. 

The Annual Meeting was held on May 3rd at Drumlin 
Farm. After transaction of necessary business, a panel 
of four conservationists representing our neighboring 
towns discussed "The Role of the Private Land Trust in a 
Town's Conservation Program". 

We continue to add to our system of marked trails for 
walking and riding; its total length is now close to 12 
miles. 

Report of the Treasurer for 1966 

On hand January 1 

General funds $4,290.03 

Brooks Fund 3,104.50 $ 7,394.53 

Receipts : 

Membership dues 
Cash gifts 
Brooks Fund 



Expenditures : 

Middlesex Institution for 
Savings: mortgage int. 
Printing & mailing 
Aerial maps, etc. 

On hand December 31 
General funds 
Brooks Fund 

123 



2,165.00 

1,400.00 

414.07 


3,979.07 
$11,373.60 


575.00 
244.75 
127.20 


946.95 


6,908.08 
3,518.57 ' 





$10,426.65 



MINUTE MAN NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK ADVISORY COMMISSION 
Katharine S. White, Lincoln Appointee 



The interim report of the Boston National Historic 
Sites Commission to the Congress dated June 16, 1958, per- 
taining to the. Lexington-Concord Battle Road, recommended 
the creation of Minute Man National Historical Park and 
the legislation authorizing such action, Public Law 86-321, 
was passed in the first section of the 86th Congress and 
approved by President Eisenhower on September 21, 1959. 

Public Law 86-321 limits the size of the park to 750 
acres in the towns of Lexington, Lincoln and Concord, and 
imposes further limitations to the effect that not more 
than $5,000,000 may be appropriated and expended for land 
acquisition and $3,000,000 for development. 

As of December 31, 1966, a total of 417 acres, repre- 
senting 127 transactions or conveyances, had been acquired 
in the project for the park. Of this total, 211.96 acres 
are in the town of Lincoln and represents 72 separate 
transactions of which 20 apply to vacant lands containing 
96.27 acres and 52 to properties with improvements con- 
taining 115.69 acres. Of the total amount of $3,796,580 
spent on land acquisition between 1961 and 1966, $2,186,390 
has been obligated to gain title to the 211.96 acres in 
Lincoln. 

Specifically, for the year 1966, 32.1 acres were 
added to the park project in Lincoln as the result of nine 
transactions at a total cost of $484,850. Of the nine 
transactions, six applied to properties that were wholly 
residential and the remaining three to properties fully or 
in part business or commercial. Among the latter, the 
Buttrick Dairy of 3.14 acres and the Giurleo Greenhouses 
of 6.40 acres in the Lincoln commercial zone on North 
Great Road were especially important. The Primak proper- 
ties embracing 8.98 acres on Brooks Road and at the Concord 
Turnpike Cutoff represented the largest single acquisition. 
The historic Hartwell Tavern, containing 2.15 acres, pur- 
chased from Mrs. Mary McHugh, was very significant among 
the residential properties acquired. 

The building on North Great Road formerly occupied by 
the Geophysics Corporation and erected originally for the 

124 



North Lincoln District School, continued to serve as tem- 
porary headquarters and offices for the park project. 
Exhibits to orient visitors to the park and vicinity were 
completed and installed in a room of this building just 
prior to Patriots' Day by an exhibit specialist from the 
National Park Service Museum Laboratory in Washington, D. 
C. This room is attended by a uniformed employee who 
answers questions and provides travel and information ser- 
vice to visitors. During the period June through Sep- 
tember, over 3,000 persons each month viewed the exhibits 
and received information here. 

Archeological field work of major importance was 
carried on by Archeologist Leland Abel at the site of the 
former Daniel Brown House on Nelson Road, only a few hun- 
dred feet from the Josiah Nelson House foundation. The 
site has proved to be one of the most productive yet lo- 
cated on the park project. Here also some of the earli- 
est artifacts have been uncovered. These consist of a 
number of coins, including one that is French and dated 
1629, two musket balls, a musket flint, an old spur and 
many fragments 6f chinaware, pottery and clay pipes. 
Most of these artifacts are no later than 1750. The 
house was not occupied in 1775 and it was probably the 
abandoned house that William Dawes rode up to after elud- 
ing the British scouts who captured Paul Revere. Besides 
a dig at the site of the Daniel Brown House, Archeologist 
Abel also excavated a small cellar hole at the rear, which 
proved to be less productive and is believed to have been 
a cordwainer's shop. 

The Minute Man National Historical Park Advisory Com- 
mission met twice during the year, on June 2 and November 
9, at the temporary headquarters on North Great Road. As 
a result of the meeting on June 2, the Commission pre- 
sented a statement at the public hearing held by the Mass- 
achusetts Department of Public Works in Concord on June 8 
in favor of the northerly alternate for the proposed relo- 
cation of Route 2. The statement also favored the merg- 
ing of Route 2A with Route 2 as far as the present traffic 
circle at West Concord. The Commission indicated its op- 
position unanimously to retention of the former Buttrick 
Mansion west of the North Bridge in Concord and made its 
views known to the Director of the National Park Service. 
At the meeting on November 9, Regional Director Lemuel A. 
Garrison and an interpretive planning team from the Nation- 
al Park Service were present to discuss the matter with the 

125 



Commission and to indicate that retention of the Mansion 
is currently viewed as a temporary expedient. 

Employees occupying permanent positions on the park 
staff at the end of 1966 were the following: 

Benjamin J. Zerbey Superintendent 

Robert D. Ronsheim Historian 

Chester W. Jarosz Administrative 

Assistant 

Maurice L. Kowal Chief of Maintenance 

Joseph A. Guerra Building Repairman 

Axel A. Christiansen Caretaker 

Ralph W. Murray Laborer 

Mary R. Harwich Secretary 

Vacancies existed at the end of the year in the per- 
manent positions of Ranger and Clerk- Typist. Ranger 
Richard A. Blasdel, who came to the park project in 1963, 
was transferred to Arbuckle National Recreational Area in 
Oklahoma during October, 1966, and a replacement for him 
was not provided before the year ended. 

Permanent employees of the National Park Service 
currently stationed at the park project for the duration 
of their specific functions are: 

Leland J. Abel Archeologist 

Warren E. Bryant Realty Specialist 

Orville Carroll Architect 

In addition, seasonal and temporary personnel are 
employed as needed and funds permit to handle administra- 
tive, interpretive, protective, research, development and 
maintenance functions. This personnel includes students 
attending Northeastern University under the Cooperative 
Educational Plan and available to assist primarily with 
interpretation and research. 



126 



TOWN HISTORIAN 
Ruth Wales 



Activities of the Town Historian during 1966 have 
been concerned primarily with preserving documents and 
records and making them accessible. 

The new storage unit for historical materials in the 
Memorial Room at the Library enables interested citizens 
and serious researchers to have convenient access to much 
of the available material relating to Lincoln history. 
The collection includes copies of Town records, maps, 
books and papers. 

Recent acquisitions add considerably to 18th Century 
detail. Reproductions of documents in the State House 
Archives dealing with the incorporation of Lincoln as a 
town on April 19, 1754, are now available. Among these 
are petitions in protest from the Mother towns of Concord, 
Lexington and Weston, as well as objections of individuals 
Lincoln tax inventories and maps in the Archives have also 
been duplicated. One map, made in 1830, shows wooded 
areas and meadowlands in the town. 

Another addition to the collection is an assortment 
of documents which had belonged to several generations of 
an 18th and 19th Century Lincoln family named Child. 
These papers were owned subsequently by Mrs. Edith B. Far- 
rar, who left them to, the town. Joshua Child was a wea- 
ver and licensed retailer who had a rum and staples shop 
on Bedford Road near the Monks property. The papers in- 
clude his account books from 1763-1775. He was also a 
Tax Collector, as was his son, and several tax lists are 
among the documents. Many of the papers are deeds. The 
unique materials (the account books and tax records) have 
been restored by a process of deacidif ication and lamina- 
tion between sheets of acetate film. This prevents fur- 
ther deterioration and permits safe handling. The re- 
maining papers, mostly deeds, have been placed in acetate 
covers, labeled, and filed. 

A complete sequence of Town Meeting Records is now 
housed at the Library. During 1966 handwritten records 



127 



from 1806-1873 were microfilmed, filling in the gap be- 
tween records photographed earlier and the beginning of 
printed Town Reports. These can be read on a portable 
microfilm viewer located near the Memorial Room in a new 
work-study area. Also microfilmed this past year are 
two volumes of 18th Century Treasurer's Records, a mine 
of information on individuals and economics. The micro- 
film collection ha.s been further enlarged with the inclu- 
sion of duplicates of the films of early church records 
made by the First Parish Church. 

At the request of the Massachusetts Historical Com- 
mission, the Town Historian and a committee formed by the 
Lincoln Historical Society made an inventory of historic 
structures in the Town of Lincoln during November and De- 
cember. Committee members were: Mrs. F. Marsena Butts, 
Mrs. Warren Flint, Mrs. Donald Leavitt, Mrs. Torrence Mar- 
tin, Mrs. Hayden Mason, Mrs. David Rogers, and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Tunnell. Fifty- four houses built before 1835, two 
contemporary houses, and six public buildings were covered 
in the survey, which will be used by the Eastern Massachu- 
setts Regional Planning Project in determining highway 
routes. 

Future plans include restoring Lincoln's early Tax 
Records (1760-1802) by the process of deacidif ication and 
lamination used on the Child papers, and beginning the 
project of microfilming the Fence Viewer , past and present. 
What's happening now is history too. 



128 










0tf 7ba/n /7a// 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Edwin M. Cole 
Alice G. Meriam 

(resigned) 
Martha DeNormandie 
Mo r ley M. John, Chairman 
Margaret B. Marsh 

(resigned) 
John A. Car ley 
Francis H. Gleason 
Albert L. Fullerton 



Life Member 

Life Member 
Life Member 
Life Member 

School Committee Appointee 
School Committee Appointee 
Selectmen Appointee 
Elected by the Town 



What's behind the statistics which show, again this 
year, increases in book circulation, in number of books 
on hand,- in number of memberships .... even in fines col- 
lected? Clearly, a community of people who like to 
read and who support their library. Lincoln's per capi- 
ta circulation of books is over twice the state average, 



129 



and so is its per capita expenditure for library opera- 
tion in towns of comparable size. Not only at town 
meeting and tax times but throughout the year, Lincoln 
citizens back their library with appreciative use, en- 
thusiastic and thoughtful suggestions, hours of unpaid 
help both in regular volunteer service and in special 
projects, and generous gifts of money, books, magazines, 
records, furnishings, flowers. 

Thriving under such attention, the competent staff 
have kept the Library operating most effectively despite 
the unfortunate absence of the librarian, Mrs. Maryalice 
Thoma, recovering from injuries sustained in an automo- 
bile accident the previous year. Mrs. Donald P. Don- 
aldson is especially to be thanked for having so ably 
filled the role of acting librarian, while all the -staff 
adjusted their schedules and duties to maintain full ser- 
vice. The other regular staff members are Mrs. Howard 
C. Kent, children's librarian since 1959, Mrs. Philip T. 
Cate, Jr., Mrs. Harry R. Healey, Jr., and Mrs. Charles 
C. MacFarland. The volunteers, led by Mrs. Edward B. 
Rawson, not only made it possible for the Library to hand- 
le its workload this year but added, as always, to the 
friendly atmosphere. 

A committee of the League of Women Voters made a very 
thorough study of the Lincoln Library and attended a 
trustees' meeting to discuss the study report. It con- 
tains a balanced look at the facilities, collection and 
functioning of the Library, interesting comparisons with 
recognized norms and standards, and a number of useful 
suggestions which the trustees hope to utilize in future 
planning. 

Apart from minor alterations in the basement and the 
usual repairs associated with an old building, the only 
structural change during the year was the addition to the 
Memorial Room of a large display and storage case for his- 
torical materials. Here the Historical Society and Vet- 
erans, as well as the Library, now have improved facili- 
ties for timely displays and special exhibits. 

With shelves nearly filled and with overcrowding es- 
pecially noticeable in the Children's Room, the Library 
should not much longer defer its expansion into the un- 
developed space under the Children's Room. The cost 
estimate of $20,000 first given to the Long Range Capital 

130 



Requirements Committee six years ago will probably need 
revision to take account of increased construction costs. 
The trustees and staff are considering various plans for 
making the best use of all available space, and would 
welcome suggestions from users. 

As the Massachusetts plan for interlibrary loans takes 
form, the Lincoln Library finds itself borrowing books 
from its assigned subregional library center, Wellesley, 
as well as from the Concord, Lexington and Boston Public 
Libraries, foreign consulates, and certain college and 
private collections. Approximately ten books a week 
are borrowed in this way now, and the activity will un- 
doubtedly increase. 

A life trustee, Mrs. Richard S. Meriam, announced her 
intention to resign during the year. Since 1947 she has 
devoted admirable energy, acumen and personal warmth to 
all aspects of Library activity. Mrs. Paul B. Marsh 
resigned also upon her election to the school committee. 
New trustees are Mrs. James DeNormandie, life trustee, 
and Mr. Francis H. Gleason, appointed by the Selectmen. 



Volunteers, 1966 



Mrs. H. N. Aptekar Mrs. 

Mrs. Thomas Beal Mrs. 

Mrs. Barry Bigelow Mrs. 

Mrs. Charles Bliss Mrs. 

Mrs. Joanna Bradshaw Mrs. 
Mrs. William H. Butler, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. Thomas P. Cope Mrs. 

Mrs. Robert Emerson Mrs. 

Mrs. Alfred Farbish Mrs. 

Mrs. Stephen Herthel Mrs. 

Mrs. Leon Hester Mrs. 

Mrs. Henry Hoover Mrs. 

Mrs. John Irwin Mrs. 

Mrs. R. B. King Mrs. 

Mrs. Charles Kubik Mrs. 

Mrs. James Lampert Mrs. 
Mrs. Paul Marsh 
Mrs. Philip Meriam 



Donald Millard 
W. H. Morse 
Joseph S. Newell 
Sholem Postel 
Edward Rawson 
Alfred Rogers 
Ralph Ruocco 
Charles Stevens 
Samuel Stevens 
Arthur Thiessen 
Richard Thorpe 
R. Langdon Wales 
Winthrop Walker 
Henry .Warner 
George Wells 
Thomas Worthing ton 



131 



Junior Volunteers 



Peggy Baldwin Thomas Jevon 

Sarah Baldwin Kate Martin 

Martha Clark Mimi Martin 

Cynthia Doherty Rowena Nelson 

Andrea Doherty Sarah Reece 

Anne Fernald Cynthia Roehr 

Julia Glass Mary Row 

Timothy Hester Susan Southard 
Richard Jevon 



132 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Hours open: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 

Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday 

Closed legal holidays and 
Saturdays in July and August 



10:30 to 8:30 
10:30 to 5:00 



General 



STATISTICS, 1966 
January 1 - December 31, 1966 



New members 
Total membership 

Amount of fines collected 

Number of days open 



304 
3,042 

$2,154.95 

293 



Acquisitions 



Books purchased 
Books received by gift 
Total acquisitions, 1966 
Inventory, 1965 

Books discarded or lost 
Inventory - 1966 

Records: 



Inventory, 1965 

Purchases 

Gifts 

Discarded or lost 
Inventory - 1966 



2,215 

296 

2,511 



28,662 

1,264 

27,398 



557 
58 
65 

680 
10 

670 



Circulation 



Adult non-fiction 
Adult fiction 
Periodicals 
Records 
Juvenile 

Total 1966 circulation 



15,762 

15,416 

2,059 

2,078 

35,467 

70,782 



133 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Mary Jane Butler, Chairman 
Rhoda Taschioglou, Secretary- 
Mary Louise Long, Treasurer 
Nancy Butler 
Donna Burt 
Charles E. Jennings 
Walter I.Keyes 
Frederick P. Walkey 
Arlene Wirsig 



Representatives to the Committee 
December 31, 1966 



Mrs. Robert Whatley 

Mrs. Fred Wilfert 

Mrs. Alfons Jozwicki 

John W. Fisher 

Mrs. David Webster and 

Mrs. E. John Ciraso 

Mr. and Mrs. John McLean 

Albert E. Nelson 

Lawrence W. Zuelke 

Mrs. Leon B. Hester 

J. Bertram Kessel 

Mrs. Robert Lenington 
William Fleck 
Spencer F. Martin, Jr. 
Mrs. Louis C. Farley, Jr, 



Volleyball 

DiPerna land 

Golf 

Men's Softball 

Ladies' Softball 

Badminton 

Co-Chairman of Basketball 

Aquatic Study Committee 

Chairman 
Walden District Water 

Safety Council 
Walden District Water 

Safety Council Alternate 
Summer Playground Committee 
Tennis Activities Chairman 
Tournaments 
Children's Instruction 



The Recreation Committee serves in an advisory cap- 
acity to the Selectmen and coordinates and supervises rec- 
reational programs for the Town. Programs currently 
sponsored by the Committee include: Skating; Skiing; Vol- 
leyball; Golf; Men's Softball; Ladies' Softball; Tennis; 
Swimming; Summer Playground; Badminton; and Basketball. 

Skating 

During the skating season the front pond in Pierce 
Park is available to all for general skating and the flood 
lights are on until 10 p.m. Hockey sticks are not al- 



134 



lowed on this pond. The back pond, which does not yet 
have lights, is reserved for hockey. 

Both ponds are checked daily by the Police Depart- 
ment, and signs are posted to indicate conditions. The 
Park Department is responsible for maintenance, under the 
supervision of Warren Flint. 

It is hoped that an arrangement can be effected for 
pond maintenance which will assure the immediate clearing 
of the two ponds after each snowstorm. This would have 
two advantages: first, the ice would be available for im- 
mediate skating; and second, the original ice surface 
could be consistently maintained rather than allowed to 
deteriorate into snow-type ice which melts to slush in 
moderate temperatures. 

Skiing 

During January and February, 1966, approximately 
250 children attended the third annual Ski School at De- 
Normandie's Hill. Classes were held on Wednesday after- 
noons, January 12th and 19th, and February 2nd and 9th. 

An enthusiastic, hard-working corps of volunteer 
mothers assisted with the afternoon classes, and several 
junior high school students served as teaching aides. 
The 4-H Sewing Group furnished attractive ski-bibs with 
numerals for teachers of each of the twelve classes. 

A small group of qualified Skiers travelled to Pros- 
pect Hill in Waltham for four sessions of slalom skiing 
with Mrs. A. P. Priest. Adult morning classes from 10 
to 11:45 a.m. were also conducted for the mother volun- 
teer corps by the Directors, Mrs. Christopher Van Curan 
and Mrs. Eugene Roberts, both of Wayland. 

Volleyball 

Volleyball sessions for ladies were held on Thurs- 
day evenings from 8 to 10 p.m. in the Smith School Gymna- 
sium from October, 1965, until March, 1966, under the di- 
rection of Mrs. Robert Whatley. Because attendance was 
somewhat disappointing, averaging only eight participants 
a session, it was decided not to resume volleyball in the 
fall. 



135 



Golf 

The Golf Program, consisting of indoor group les- 
sons for beginners and for intermediate-advanced golfers, 
started March 10th and continued through April 14th. 
Both classes were held on Thursday evenings in the Smith 
School gym for a total of six one-hour sessions each. 
Thirty-three persons attended. Mr. John Thoren, golf 
professional at the Myopia Hunt Club, was the instructor. 
The activity was self-supporting. 

Men's Softball 

, The Lincoln Softball League in 1966, composed of 
four teams, played a thirty-six game schedule beginning 
on May 23rd and finishing on July 28th. Team No. 4 
from the Nike Base won both the League title and the play- 
offs. All games were played on Monday, Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday and Thursday evenings on the Town Softball Field. 
The League, managed by John W. Fisher, was self-support- 
ing and received no financial assistance from the Town. 

Ladies' Softball 

Under the leadership of Mrs. David Webster and Mrs. 
E. John Ciraso, Ladies' Softball meetings were organized 
in the spring. Eight sessions were planned on Tuesday 
mornings from 9:30 to 11:30 a. m. at Center School. Un- 
fortunately, rain caused cancellation of several meet- 
ings. Attendance was gratifying, averaging twelve women. 
(This may have been enhanced by a babysitting service at 
the game location, paid for by the participant mothers.) 
Mrs. Fred Iosue of Carlisle graciously agreed to come to 
Lincoln to coach at the games. 

Tennis 

In 1966 Lincoln had entries in three divisions of 
the Ladies' Suburban League: Longwood , Mrs. Louis Farley, 
Captain; Wimbledon , Mrs. John Crawford, Captain; and For - 
est Hills, Mrs. Pierre Dreyfus, Captain. 

Lincoln entered two teams in the Men's Suburban 
Tennis League in 1966: B League , Spencer Martin, Captain; 
and C League , Theodore Polumbaum, Captain. On July 4th 
a Men's Doubles Round Robin Tournament was held on the 

136 



town courts under the direction of Gordon Gatchell and 
Sam Donnell. About thirty entered. 

Mrs. Bradlee Emmons coached the Wightman Cup Team 
for teen-age girls, with approximately twelve participa- 
ting. Matches for Junior and Senior boys were conducted 
under the auspices of the New England Lawn Tennis Associ- 
ation. 

Over one hundred children' participated in the sum- 
mer program of tennis instruction. Of the three in- 
structional plans offered, forty-six children enrolled 
for the five-week session; thirty- four children, for the 
first three-week session; and twenty-two, for the second 
three-week session. Mr. Larry Palmer of Tufts University 
served as tennis instructor for the second year, assisted 
by Paul Nystrom, who also worked on court maintenance. 
Ellen Fisher returned as a tennis trainee. 

The annual fall Town Tennis Tournament attracted a 
total of two hundred eighteen men and women participants. 
The Tournament Director this year was Spencer Martin. 
This year's winners were: 

Men's Singles - Ernest Johnson 
Men's Doubles - Gordon Gatchell and 

Fred Walkey 
Women's Singles - Marianne Terbourgh 
Women's Doubles - Marcia Roehr and 

Elizabeth Plympton 
Mixed Doubles - Marcia Roehr and 

Spencer Martin 

Mr. Frederick P. Walkey supervised maintenance of 
the town courts on behalf of the Recreation Committee. 

Swimming 

There was no Water Safety program conducted in con- 
junction with the Lincoln Summer Playground during the 
1966 season. The cancellation of the planned swimming 
program was forced because of the low water level at Wal- 
den Pond which produced insufficient shallow water and 
no gradual incline. These adverse features rendered 
the pond not adequately safe for an instruction area. 

Lincoln maintains a membership in the Walden Dis- 

137 



trict .Water Safety Council along with Acton, Bedford, 
Carlisle, Concord and Sudbury. This organization was 
formed in 1962 to promote, regulate and supervise a water 
safety program for the member towns at Walden Pond. Dur- 
ing the 1965 season the Council, receiving authority 
from the Middlesex County Commissioners, conducted a Wat- 
er Safety Program. This swimming program was formerly 
subsidized and administered by the American Red Cross, 
Concord Chapter. At this time the Walden District Water 
Safety Council is on inactive status. 

The Aquatics Study Committee was organized in 1965 
to serve in an advisory capacity to the Recreation Com- 
mittee. During the spring and summer of 1966, members of 
the Recreation Committee and the Aquatics Study Committee 
researched earthen pond swimming facilities. Mr. Fred- 
erick Giebel of the U. S. Soil Conservation Service per- 
formed tests on three potential Lincoln sites for an 
earthen pool. All proved to be undesirable. The 
Aquatics Study Committee recommended a long-range pro- 
gram of integration into the school system. 

Lincoln Summer Playground 

The 1966 summer playground opened its five-week 
session on June 27th with Mr. Russell Mann as Director. 
Counselors were Susan Brown, Adair Linn, Ellen Beck, 
Llewellyn Parsons, Elaine Noble, Hooper Brooks, Peter 
Berg, Robert Burns, with William Mietzner as Art Director 
and Donald Ekengren as Shop Director. The Program 
Aide Trainees (PATS) were Robert Grabill, Pam Jeffery, 
Andrea Cain, Dania Loewenstein, Alice Spooner, Barbara 
Rice, Paula Durnan and Roslyn Hamilton. Although the 
lack of swimming affected many youngsters' schedules, 
the final registration figure was 312, with a $3 fee be- 
ing paid by each child. 

The day camp type program included a balanced 
variety of athletics, arts and crafts, music, drama, 
quiet games and special events. This year a color des- 
ignation was used for each of the five age groups. Kin- 
dergarteners were Cherries; first and second graders, 
Golds; third and fourth graders, Flames; fifth and sixth 
graders, Limes; and seventh and eighth graders were Roy- 
als, with appropriately colored name tags for each young 
person. Kindergarteners attended half-days only. 



138 



Mornings were devoted to scheduled activities with- 
in age groups while afternoons were occupied with chosen 
interest groups often developed by the children them- 
selves and open to a wider age range. Each week had a 
central theme* e.g., Comic Strip Week, Wild West Week, 
Spook Week, International Week, and Circus Week with 
activities planned around the theme. 

Particularly popular were the haying session in 
Concord, movie making, trampoline instruction, cook-outs, 
bike hikes, overnight camping, canoeing, riflery for old- 
er boys at the Police Station, Boston trip for older 
girls, the newspaper, visit from Drumlin Farm animals, 
Backwards Day, cooking international foods, learning the 
stick dance and other foreign dances, nature hikes, mak- 
ing up skits, and being sprinkled by the Fire Department's 
fog spray. 

The playground group went to the Esplanade Concert 
during the third week, and older children visited the 
Higgins Museum of Armor in Worcester during the last week. 
The baseball team played several games at other play- 
grounds, and hosted some teams at the Brooks ball field. 

Family Night climaxed the last week and included the 
Pet Show, the showing of the film made by the Movie Group, 
a puppet show, trampoline exhibition, skits by the PATS 
and playgrounders, and family games. Service projects 
participated in by playgrounders were clean-up of DiPerna 
ball field area, skimming algae from Pierce Pond, and the 
annual post-July 4 clean-up. 

New this year were Electronics and Metal Working 
offered along with the popular Woodworking activity to 
sixth graders and up. 

The background of the staff was again rich and 
varied, covering a wide gamut of experiences which they 
shared enthusiastically with the children. This was aug- 
mented by the liaison of the Playground Committee who 
maintained daily contact to assist with administrative de- 
tails and developing local resources. It has been a 
pleasure to have Mrs. William Burt working closely with 
the program during the past year in preparation for as- 
suming the chairmanship. New and exciting ideas are 
being considered for the future which promise a continued 
growth in summer playground opportunities. 

139 



Badminton 

The badminton group played every Tuesday evening 
on three courts in the Smith School Gym from October 
through April. Rackets and birdies were provided, and 
players 1 weekly contribution of 50C covered these costs. 
This group was led by Mr. and Mrs. John McLean. 

Basketball 

Basketball, managed and coached by Walter Keyes, 
Robert Gray and Elmer Ziegler, is offered to boys in the 
5th 'through 8th grades on Saturdays, and to men on Thurs- 
day evenings. Outside games with Hanscom School in Bed- 
ford have been scheduled for the boys. High school 
boys have their owr program on Saturday afternoons. Ap- 
proximately sixty-five boys and twelve men participate 
each week. 



The Recreation Committee takes responsibility for 
recreational activities on the Fourth of July and coor- 
dinates with the Celebrations Committee in scheduling 
events which this year included the following: Tennis 
Demonstrations and Men's Doubles - Gordon Gatchell and 
Sam Donnell; Children's Races - William B. Butler; La- 
crosse Match - Robert Baldwin; Men's and Pony League 
Baseball Games - Boys' League. 

The Recreation Committee sponsored a Family Carol 
Sing at Pierce Park' on Wednesday evening, December 21st, 
with the assistance of Reverend James Riddle, the Boy 
Scouts, the Girl Scouts, and the Police and Highway De- 
partments. - 

In addition to the programs outlined above, the 
Recreation Committee has been concerned during the past 
year with teen-age recreational opportunities in Lincoln; 
utilization of the DiPerna land; liaison with the Select- 
men; and maintenance of facilities. 

A Spring Newsletter outlining current activities 
was sent to all Lincoln residents. This publicity was 
supplemented by thorough' coverage of matters related to 
Town recreational activities in The Fenceviewer . 

During the 1966 calendar year resignations from 
the Committee were regretfully accepted from five members 

140 



They included Mr. Bertram Kessel, who contributed eight 
years of conscientious work to the Committee as its Chair- 
man; Mrs. David Ogden, who served as Committee Secretary 
for three years; Mrs. Fred J. Wilfert, a member two years; 
Mr. John Fisher, a member three years; and Mr. Albert Nel- 
son, a member eight years. The Committee welcomes the 
continued interest of these valued former members. 

The Recreation Committee also appreciates the con- 
sistent help and support of Mr.. Warren Flint and Mr. Frank 
Cande. 



141 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

Paul Brooks 

Elizabeth Harney 

Thomas Winship, Chairman 



A program of lively talks and exciting performances 
was scheduled for the 7 3rd year of the Bemis Lecture 
Fund. 

The first speaker, on November 18th, was Dr. Stan- 
ley A. Cain, Under Secretary of the Interior, and dedi- 
cated conservationist. We thoroughly enjoyed the en- 
couragement and support he gave us for our land conser- 
vation program. 

The next event was to have been a memorable first 
in the annals of the Bemis Series, and still will be, we 
hope, - although not on February 3rd, as scheduled. Rud- 
olf Serkin, the great pianist, will play for us on June 
2nd instead. Because of the unusual interest expressed 
in his visit, we shall have 850 tickets available at 
Town Hall two weeks before his appearance. Four to each 
family will be distributed on a "first-come, first-serve" 
basis. In this way, we hope to avoid the necessity of 
turning away townspeople at the door. Any ideas for a 
fairer and simpler method of distribution would be great- 
ly appreciated by the trustees. 

Dorothy Rankin, a puppeteer, will present her "turn- 
about theatre" on March 10th. This promises to be a 
diverting evening for the children and a fascinating one 
for their parents since her presentation will also in- 
clude an explanation of the backstage operation involved. 

Finally, the night of April 14th this year should 
prove as stimulating as our evening with Dean Acheson 
was last year. John Kenneth Galbraith, economist, for- 
mer Ambassador to India, and author of American Capital- 
ism and The Affluent Society , will present his ideas of 
"A Modern Foreign Policy". 

The trustees invite suggestions for other distin- 
guished lecturers or performers for next year. 



142 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Victor A. Lutnicki, President 



In its seventeenth year DeCordova and Dana Museum 
and Park completed the first major enlargement of its 
operating facilities. After many years of planning and 
fund-raising, four new classroom buildings were finally 
dedicated to public use in October. Located on newly 
acauired land this unique complex of one-room buildings 
and outdoor courts provides a strikingly attractive and 
remarkably efficient accommodation for the Museum's ex- 
panding school. For many years to come, the Lincoln 
residents who use the Museum's School will be indebted to 
the large number of donors and volunteer workers from the 
entire Greater Boston area whose generosity and effort 
made this addition possible. 

Three members of the Board of Directors completed 
their service to the Museum during the year. They were 
Dana W. Atchley, Jr., a past president; Eliot Hubbard, 
III; and Paul W. Cook, Jr. All of them deserve recogni- 
tion of their years of work and many contributions to the 
Museum's success. In their places, Messrs. Sumner Smith, 
Hamilton R. James, and Richard B. Bailey were elected or 
appointed to serve as Directors. These changes and those 
of the immediately preceding year provide the Board with 
a fresh supply of interest and competence that may be ex- 
pected to carry the institution into what is clearly des- 
tined to be a new era of enlarged activity. 

While the Museum has pressing needs in connection 
with its operational budget, it is gratifying at last to 
be able to present a report without an urgent appeal for 
additional funds for building purposes. Further addi- 
tions to buildings and grounds, as well as major enlarge- 
ments in the Museum's program, must now wait until suffi- 
cient additional income is generated from total opera- 
tions and all supporting sources to meet the deficit in 
operating income. This deficit arises in part from the 
added expense of the new facilities. It also arises in 
part from the re-examination of career opportunities of- 
fered by the Museum to its growing staff, mentioned in 
last year's report, and the adjustments that were made as 
part of this program. 

143 



So, in the end, as always, the Museum thanks its 
supporters for what they have done and looks to them 
again for help with what remains to be done. For the 
year ahead of us, this will be the liquidation of the 
$25,000 budget deficit. 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
Frederick P. Walkey 



The opening of four new classroom studios was the 
highlight of the DeCordova Museum's program in 1966. 
This, step was significant because it inaugurated a 
change in concept: the exhibition facilities and the ed- 
ucational facilities will henceforth be separated, and 
each part of the art center can grow at its own rate 
without being restricted by a physical bond with the oth- 
er. 

The October registration for Museum classes leapt 
from 500 to 800 students, validating the decision to add 
more teaching space. The Dedication ceremony, attended 
by many of the 1500 contributors to the cost of the build- 
ings, vE5 -emorable. Guest speakers were Governor John 
A. Volper Bartlett Hayes, Director of the Addison Gallery 
of American Art; and David McCord, poet. 

The irr.pact :: the er.l-rrei school has beer, substan- 
tial. It has necessitated enlarging the staff to in- 
clude a Curator of Education, a full-time Custodian for 
the School, and several part-time employees to supervise 
the buildings which are open six days a week and four 
nights until 10 p.m. The physical facilities at the 
Museum have been greatly improved with the removal of 
classes from the third floor to the new studios. The 
third floor has been converted largely to office space. 
Two rooms in the second floor and one room on the third 
floor have been or are in the process of being converted 
to public use. A new Sales Room carrying many educa- 
tional publications is now in operation, and a new audio- 
visual room will be ready for use in the spring of 1967. 
The library has been moved to the third floor where there 
is now also a very attractive new exhibition gallery 
which doubles as a meeting room for the Associate Council, 

144 



Board of Directors and other Museum Committees. 

Several exhibitions last year are worthy of mention 
in this report. In some ways the Fitz Hugh Lane exhib- 
ition stands out in retrospect. It was the first major 
exhibition of this 19th century American marine painter 
and came just 100 years after his death. An exhibition 
long overdue for this neglected Gloucester artist, it 
has stimulated our interest in the period and will be 
followed by one or more exhibitions from the same period. 

During the summer the Museum presented the largest 
and most comprehensive exhibition of contemporary sculp- 
ture ever shown in the Boston area. Some forty major 
pieces were installed in the park. The exhibition drew 
visitors from many parts of the U. S. 

Jack Wolfe was given his fifth solo exhibition at 
the Museum in October and continued to justify the atten- 
tion given his work with still another dramatic exhibi- 
tion of forceful, sometimes dazzling, multi-panelled 
paintings. The last exhibition of 1966 was as provoca- 
tive as the earlier "White on White" of 1965. Given the 
title "Pow-Zap-Varoomi " which came as close as words can 
to describing its content and visual impact, the exhibi- 
tion was received with unexpected enthusiasm by the press 
and hundreds of visitors, who streamed continuously 
through the galleries. 

The admission fee of 50C for visitors over 21 has 
in no way affected attendance. The number of visitors 
in 1966 was greater than ever before. The added income 
has been plowed back into the exhibition program making 
it possible for the Museum to offer major international 
exhibitions with greater frequency. 

As a museum, the DeCordova has two major functions: 
to exhibit and to acquire works of art. We have for 
many years consciously emphasized the exhibition program, 
but the time has come to put these two activities in bet- 
ter balance, for ultimately a Museum is more highly re- 
garded for what it owns than for what it does. The 
Board of Directors has appointed a committee of distin- 
guished collectors and patrons of art to assist the Mus- 
eum in building its collection. The first few years 
will be devoted to acquiring sculpture which can be in- 
stalled more or less permanently in the park. Since 

145 



the exhibition space in the Museum is limited, the Com- 
mittee decided to acquire works initially which would be 
on exhibition constantly, and outdoor sculpture was the 
logical choice. The Museum received several important 
gifts in 1966 from distinguished artists: "Three Lines" 
by George Rickey, the most popular piece in the Outdoor 
Sculpture Exhibition; a drawing and a small sculpture by 
Leonard Baskin; a five-panel painting "Holtboorg" by 
Jack Wolfe; and "Parade" by Bernard Chaet, a large semi- 
abstract painting which has been shown on several occa- 
sions in loan exhibitions at the Museum. 

The ever-expanding activities of the Museum and the 
growing roster of volunteers increase the probability of 
overlooking someone who should be thanked in this report. 
Therefore, at the outset we extend our sincere thanks to 
all of you who worked for the Museum last year, to those 
of you who contributed so generously to the Second Dec- 
ade Fund, and to each Associate whose annual contribution 
is essential to balancing the operating budget. 

There are several people whose volunteer contribu- 
tions have been so invaluable that they must be singled 
out for special mention. The Museum is indebted to all 
the members of the Associate Council and particularly to 
the out-going Chairman Mrs. Everett Black and to the new 
Chairman Mrs. Theodore Tucker. The Council is made up 
of thirty dedicated and highly capable ladies from many 
communities who are responsible for all membership, soc- 
ial and fund-raising activity at the Museum. 

The Music Program at DeCordova has been placed in 
the hands of the DeCordova Music Society. A steering 
committee of seven members under the conscientious and 
imaginative chairmanship of Mrs. Albert C. England has 
presented a variety of concerts chosen for their excel- 
lence and because they are appropriately scaled to the 
size of the Museum hall. A special Christmas concert 
combining jazz and classical music by the Herb Pomeroy 
Jazz Quintet and the Fine Arts Woodwind Quintet was pre- 
sented at the Brooks School Auditorium and drew the larg- 
est concert audience of the year. 

In 1966, for the second successive season, the art 
of poetry was represented at the Museum in a series of 
poetry readings ably arranged and managed by Mrs. Rosa- 
mond Field. The readings presented in 1966 by May Swen- 

146 



son, Richard Wilbur and Gary Snyder drew appreciative 
audiences in which those aged 25 and under were heavily 
represented. 

The Museum's very popular film programs were con- 
ducted again in 1966 by the efficient and resourceful 
team of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Duane. The two film series 
presented last year — "La Nouvelle Vogue" in the spring 
and "Four Feral Females" in the fall — were received 
with enthusiasm by the numerous film buffs in the Museum's 
membership. 

Two important fund-raising events were conducted in 
1966, and each was as successful in its own way as is 
possible. "The Tournament of DeCordova", the Museum's 
ninth spring festival, was held on June 4, and a "Lincoln 
House Tour" was held on May 21. 

Mrs. Kemon Taschioglou was the General Chairman of 
the "Tournament of DeCordova". Rhoda ' s remarkable gift 
for organization, her energetic leadership and her dedica- 
tion combined with the talents of an exceptionally effect- 
ive committee to produce a festival that was an unqualified 
artistic and financial success. 

The Lincoln House Tour was efficiently and imagina- 
tively organized by Mrs. Max Mason. If attendance at 
the House Tour had been any larger, it would have been 
almost unmanageable. Once again, as on many previous 
occasions, the Museum was indebted to the Lincoln Police 
for their help in managing the flow of people and traffic 
through town. The cooperation of Town officials and the 
School administration has been much appreciated this year. 
We thank the Selectmen especially for their help in solv- 
ing parking and transportation problems in connection 
with the Festival and for the use of the Town Hall for the 
Teenage Theater Workshop. 

Again this year, we wish to express continuing ap- 
preciation to the Fence Viewer for its complete and accu- 
rate coverage of events at the DeCordova Museum. And 
finally, I wish to thank the Board of Directors for their 
support and guidance and to commend the members of the 
Museum staff for the way each handles his job. Every 
member of the staff can take pride in this year of accom- 
plishment, for each has contributed significantly to the 
Museum's success. 

147 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM, BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
December 31, 1966 



Victor A. Lutnicki, President 

Francis S. Andrews, Vice President 

Janet Daniels, Clerk 

Stanley Heck, Treasurer 

Sumner Smith 

Hamilton James 

Richard Bailey 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM, STAFF 
December 31, 1966 



Frederick P. Walkey, Director 

Foster H. Nystrom, Assistant Director 

Miriam H. Jagger, Assistant to Director 

John D. McLaughlin, Curator of Education 

Ann Alcott Lummus, Associate Secretary 

Cordelia Molloy, Bookkeeper 

Miriam Weinstein, School Registrar 

Joan Kennedy, Receptionist 

Sheila Ruyle, Part-time Secretary 

Margaret McKhann, Part-time Lecturer 

Karl Lahnstein, Building Superintendent 

Floriy Campobasso, Caretaker 

Frank Balduf, Custodian 

James Kelly, Custodian 

Ann Aschenbrenner, Supply Room Clerk 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM, ASSOCIATE COUNCIL 
December 31, 1966 

Mrs. Theodore W. Tucker, Chairman 

Mrs. Joseph W. Gardella, Secretary 

Mrs. Clarence G. Fauntleroy, Membership 

Mrs. Chester C. d'Autremont, Hospitality 

Mrs. Walter J. Salmon, Publicity 

Mrs. John Davies, Volunteers 

Mrs. Albert C. England, Music Society 

Mrs. J. J. Duane, Film Society 

Mrs. Robert H. Booth, Lincoln Garden Club 



148 



Mrs. James C. Orr, Adventures in Music 
Mrs. L. Bruce Long, Telephone Directory- 
Mrs. Everett A. Black, Past Chairman 
Mrs. David Neelon, Acton Chairman 
Mrs. Robert King, Bedford Chairman 
Mrs. Herbert Lee, Belmont Representative 
Mrs. Robert B. Woodward, Belmont Representative 
Mrs. Harold Wilkins, Belmont Representative 
Mrs. James Skinner, Concord Representative 
Mrs. Robert D. Asher, Concord Representative 
Mrs. Haskell Collins, Hanscom Chairman 
Mrs. Robert Newman, Lexington Representative 
Mrs. Milton Collins, Lexington Representative 
Mrs. E. Karl Bastress, Lincoln Chairman 
Mrs. Samuel Donnell, Lincoln Representative 
Mrs. John Edwards, Sudbury Chairman 
Mrs. Joseph Atwood, Sudbury Representative 
Mrs. William Keast, Wayland Chairman 
Mrs. Frank Stites, Wayland Representative 
Mrs. G. Lane Johnson, Wellesley Representative 
Mrs. D. Elliot Cullati, Weston Representative 
Mrs. B. J. Ryan, Weston Representative 



149 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Statement of Income and Expense for 1966 



Income: 

Trusts $94,681.84 

Associate contri- 
butions 40,179.15 

Tuition from 

classes 57,816.10 

Receipts from con- 
certs, films, 
benefits, exhibits 32,030.95 

Other Income (sales, 
interest, services, 
miscellaneous) 18, 708.25 

Total Operating Income $243,416.29 

Contributions to Building Funds 39,443.79 

Total Income, All Sources $282,860.08 

Expense: 

Administrative Staff 

(salaries, benefits) 94,735.11 
School (teaching 

staff, supplies) 36,902.51 
Operating expense of 

Museum & Park 108, 277.98 

Total Operating Expense 2 39,915.60 

Contributions Allocated to 

Building Funds 39,443.79 



Allocations to Building Funds 
from 1966 Operating Profit 



Total Expenses and Allocations to Reserves $282,860.08 



150 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Balance Sheet, December 31/ 1967 



ASSETS: 



Savings 

Checking Account 
Payroll Account 



Total Assets 



LIABILITIES: 



$ 9,255.87 
20,890.35 



$ 35,146.22 



Corporate Reserve 

Accessions Reserve 

Building Funds 

Depreciation Funds 

(reserves for capital 
expenditures to replace 
equipment and repair 
buildings and roads) 

Park Development Fund 

Payroll 

Working Capital 

Total Liabilities 



10,000.00 

967.14 

1,938.43 

6,936.17 



1,993.83 
5,000.00 
8,310.65 



$ 35,146.22 



Total Allocations to Reserve Funds in 1966 

Total Expenditures Charged to Reserve Funds, 
1966 



$ 50,283.79 
$160,013.18 



151 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1967-1968 



September 


4 


Monday 


September 


5 


Tuesday 


September 


6 


Wednesday 


September 


7 


Thursday 


September 


8 


Friday 


October 


12 


Thursday 


November 


22 


Wednesday 


November 


27 


Monday 


December 


21 


Thursday 


January 


2 


Tuesday 


February 


19 


Monday 


February 


26 


Monday 


April 


12 


Friday 


April 


22 


Monday 


May 


30 


Thursday 


June 


17 


Monday 


June 


18 


Tuesday 


June 


19 


Wednesday 


June 


20 


Thursday 


June 


21 


Friday 



Labor Day (Holiday) 

Workshops and Staff Orientation 

Workshops and Staff Orientation 

Workshops and Staff Orientation 

School Opens - All Classes 

Columbus Day - Holiday 

Vacation (Begins at Noontime) 

Classes Resume 

Vacation (Begins at Noontime) 

Classes Resume 

Vacation Week 

Classes Resume 

Vacation (Begins at Noontime) 

Classes Resume 

Memorial Day - Holiday 

Hanscom School Graduation-2 :00 p.m. 

Brooks School Graduation-8 :00 p.m. 

Classes End at Noontime 

Staff - Closing Activities 

Staff - Closing Activities 



N. B. : Within the regular school year, classes end at 

noontime on Wednesdays with the exception of the 
week in which there are holidays; in those in- 
stances, Wednesdays are full days of school. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



1968 



June 


26 




July 


26 


Days : 


September 


16 


October 




21 


November 




20 


December 




15 


January 




22 



Summer School Openi 
Summer School Ends 

Days in School Year by Months 



February 




16 


March 




21 


April 
May 




17 
22 


June 




13 


>ar 

iOl 


183 
21 





Number of Days in School Year 
Number of Days, Summer School 



Kindergarten morning and afternoon sessions will 
reverse on Monday, January 29, 1968 



"NO SCHOOL" SIGNALS - Local signals will be given on our fire 

alarm system 



7:15 a.m. 
7:30 a.m. 



3-3-3, repeated at 
3-3-3 



152 



Radio announcements will be read between the period of 
6:30 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. Please refrain from tying up 
local phone lines to school officials and bus operators. 
(WCOP. . .1150K; WBZ. . .1030K; WEEI . . .590K; WHDH...850K; 
WEZE. . .1260K; WMEX. . . 1510K; WNAC...680K) 

Announcements regarding "NO SCHOOL" are made by the Lin- 
coln Superintendent of Schools for the Lincoln Elementary 
Schools (Grade K-8) only. Announcements for the Regional 
High School are made by the Regional Superintendent of 
Schools and will be designated "Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
High School". 



153 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 



School Committee 



Perry J. Culver, M. D, 
Charles H. Stevens 
Margaret B. Marsh 



Chairman 



Term Expires 

1967 
1968 
1969 



Meetings: Regular: First Monday of each month, 7:30 p.m. 

Office of the Superintendent, 259-9400 

Called: Third Monday of each month, usually, 
and other meetings as stated. Time 
and place to be designated. 

All regular meetings open. Items for 
the agenda must be in the Office of the 
Superintendent by 3:00 p.m. on the 
Thursday prior to the Monday meeting. 



Robert L. Filbin 



George W. Drake 



Superintendent of Schools 

Center School 
Administrative Assistant 
Center School 
Superintendent's Office Staff 



(Mrs.) Mary Ann Wilson Secretary 

(Mrs.) Harriett Parks Financial Secretary 

(Mrs.) Mary Bufton Clerk- Typist 

(Mrs.) Solveig Parsons Secretary 



259-9400 



259-9406 



259-9400 
259-9401 
259-9401 
259-9401 



Hours: Office of the Superintendent -8:30 a.m. 
4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday; Saturday and 
evenings by appointment. 



Principal, Hartwell School 

(Mrs.) Joan B. Warren 

Office Staff 

(Mrs.) Doris Bardsley Secretary, Hartwell School 
(Mrs.) Kathryne Palmer 



Principal, Smith School 



Stefan Vogel 



259-9404 



259-9404 
259-9404 



259-9403 



154 



(Mrs.) Mary Donovan 
(Mrs.) Nancy Colbert 



Office Staff 
Secretary, Smith School 



Timothy Rhodes 



Principal, Brooks School 



Office Staff 



(Mrs.) Rachel Conner Secretary, Brooks School 
(Mrs.) Eileen Salender 



Timothy Graves 



Principal, Hanscom Primary School 



Office Staff 



(Mrs.) Margaret Conway Secretary, Hanscom Primary 

School 
(Mrs.) Shirley Seavey 

Principal, Hanscom Upper School 

Robert A. Leach 

Office Staff 

(Mrs.) Ruby Gregory Secretary, Hanscom Upper 

School 
(Mrs.) Lorraine Wells 

Non-Staff Members - Resigned 1966 

(Mrs.) Judith Nizza Smith School 

(Mrs.) Neila Perkins Brooks School 

(Mrs.) Hazel Smith Brooks School 

(Mrs.) Nancy Cammarata Hanscom Primary School 

(Mrs.) Lucile Needham Hanscom Upper School 

Hours - School Offices 

8:15 a.m. - 4:15 p.m., Monday through Friday 

School Nurses 

(Mrs.) Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 

Hartwell, Smith and Brooks 
Schools 
(Mrs.) Gladys Crumb, R. N. 

Hanscom Primary and Upper 
Schools 



259-9403 
259-9403 



259-9408 



259-9408 
259-9408 



274-7721 



274-7721 
274-7721 



274-7720 



274-7720 
274-7720 



259-9407 
274-7723 



155 



Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 



John J. Carroll 



Center School 
Custodians 



259-9406 



Richard Gunzelmann 



Center School 



Festus Armstrong 

Harold Cuttell 

Ralph H. Gilbert, Jr. 

Oscar DeConte 
Ralph Weatherbee 

John Biondo 
Chester R. Holt 



Hartwell School 
Hartwell School 
Hartwell School 

Smith School 
Smith School 

Brooks School 
Brooks School 



Albert J. Connors 
Albert A. Fava 

Stanford Abbott 
Daniel O'Leary 



Hanscom Primary School 
Hanscom Primary School 

Hanscom Upper School 
Hanscom Upper School 



Terminated employment in 1966 



Frank Amendolia 
Edward P. Menard 
Atwell Williams 



156 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Perry J. Culver, M. D. , Chairman 
Margaret B. Marsh 
Charles H. Stevens 



In this, the final report to be written by the 
.present chairman of the School Committee, who has served 
for the last nine years, it seems appropriate to review 
some highlights of the past decade in the Lincoln Public 
Schools. Such a recapitulation seems in order in as 
much as at least one third of the people now residing in 
Lincoln did not live here in 1957. While the Town was 
growing from 2,949 in 1955 to 4,463 in 1965, the launch- 
ing of Sputnick I on October 4, 1957, stimulated the de- 
velopment in the American people - here and elsewhere - 
of a major and increasing concern over the quality and 
content of education. That the Lincoln Schools have 
more than met this challenge is due to the whole-hearted 
support of an enlightened citizenry. 

A school system may be described best in terms of 
physical facilities, people, and policy as manifested by 
curriculum and the annual budget. Some significant stat- 
istics for the past 10 years are shown in Table I: 

TABLE I 

Yearly Enrollment, Size of Faculty, Budget 
and Per Pupil Cost for Decade 1957-1966 

Per 
Pupil 
udqet Cost 





New 










Bldg. Enrol 1- 


Number 


of 


Teachers 


Year 


Opened merit* 


Full -Time 


Part-Time 


1957 


647 


33 




1 


1958 


Hartwell 705 


35 




1 


1959 


762 


38 




_ 



$251,000 $387 
273,000 387 
373,000 490 

1960 2 Hart- 

well 
Additions 813 44 - 431,000 531 

1961 894 47 4 470,000 525 

157 



Year 


New 
Bldg. Enroll- 
Opened ment* 


Number of 
Full-Time 


Teachers 
Part-Time 


1962 


920 


52 




4 


1963 


971 


52 




8 


1964 


Brooks & 
3rd Hart- 
well 
Addition 974 


57 




7 


1965 


1006 


57 




8 


1966 


1025 


59 




9 



Per 
Pupil 
Budget Cost 

$525,000 $570 

586,000 603 



627,000 643 
698,000 694 
783,000 764 



* Based on the October 1 enrollment of the previous 
year. 



The 647 pupils of the Lincoln Elementary Schools in 
1957 were already straining the seams of the Smith, Cen- 
ter and old South School (the little Red School House) . 
In 1958, opening of the William Hartwell School, named 
for the first settler of Lincoln, provided much needed 
relief. Growth of school population seemed always to 
be ahead of planning. Completion of the first two addi- 
tions at the Hartwell School in 1960 was none too soon. 
These buildings were among the first in the United States 
to introduce flexibility in teaching spaces. Now flexi- 
bility is an essential in all desirable school construct- 
ion. 

In addition to its educational advantages, the mater- 
ial worth of flexible teaching spaces was demonstrated 
when many more than the planned-for number of students 
were comfortably crowded into the Hartwell additions 
while the Town was debating the planning and construction 
of the Brooks School. In 1962, a Long-Range Planning 
Committee of citizens appointed by the School Committee, 
presented a Campus Plan for the Lincoln Elementary 
Schools, consisting of a lower, a middle and an upper 
school. A campus plan is now recognized by many lead- 
ers in education as one of the newer advances in school 
facilities. Meanwhile, a national jury of the American 
Association of School Administrators selected the long- 



158 



range plans and the architect's design of the Brooks 
School for one of twenty-five citations from among sev- 
eral hundred entries in 1963 as a prototype of the new 
ideas for school building. The Brooks School and a 
third Hartwell addition were completed in 1964. Then 
the campus plan became a reality in Lincoln; and the 
beauty of the teaching environment had a tremendous im- 
pact on the enthusiasm of faculty and students. 

The success of a school is conditioned by the aspir- 
ations of its faculty and administration. Lincoln has 
been a felicitous situation for professional growth. Dr. 
Douglass B. Roberts, who started the Lincoln Schools on 
the path to improvement in education, resigned in 1957 to 
become Superintendent of Schools in Glens Falls, New York. 
That same year Mr. James F. Gray was appointed Superin- 
tendent and brought with him his unusual aptitude for 
curriculum planning. Mr. Gray's abilities were soon 
recognized elsewhere. In 1959 he resigned to accept a 
position as assistant Superintendent for Curriculum in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lincoln was fortunate in attracting Dr. John B. 
Davis, Executive Secretary of the New England School De- 
velopment Council, as its next Superintendent. With his 
guidance, the School Committee began to establish written 
policies as guidelines for future actions and recognized 
its role as a policy-making body, while assigning admin- 
istration to the Superintendent and his staff. Dr. Davis 
also developed an effective administrative pattern for a 
growing school system and introduced budgetary controls. 
In 1963, John Davis was invited to become Superintendent 
of the Worcester, Massachusetts, Public Schools. Mr. 
Robert L. Filbin, a nationally recognized expert in read- 
ing problems and techniques, who had been appointed Prin- 
cipal of the primary school in 1958, was promoted to Sup- 
erintendent. 

Throughout his Principalship and Superintendency, 
Mr. Filbin has sponsored a most successful reading pro- 
gram, team-teaching and non-graded classes. He has led 
the faculty in continual evaluation of the curriculum and 
in the study of innovations in education. 

The Principals, enjoying considerable autonomy, have 
had much influence in the development of the particular 
characteristics of the separate schools, while at the 

159 



same time serving as the administrative staff for the 
Superintendent. Mr. Harry T. Burke was Principal of 
the Smith School from 1957 to 1962, followed by Robert 
Filbin in 1962-63. Mr. Stefan Vogel, after being a 
team leader, was appointed Smith School Principal in 
1963 and continues in that capacity. 

Mr. Robert L. Filbin, Principal of the Hartwell 
School from 1958 to 1962, was succeeded by Mrs. Joan B. 
Warren. In 1965, Mr. Timothy Rhodes, who resigned from 
the Lincoln Schools as a teacher of mathematics in 1957, 
returned from the Superintendency of the Dover, Massa- 
chusetts, Schools; to become Principal of the Joseph 
Brooks School. 

Ever since its opening in 1959, Mr. Robert A. Leach, 
a former teacher in the Lincoln Schools, has been a most 
able Head Principal of the schools at the L. G.Hanscom 
Field. He was joined in 1965 by Mr. Timothy Graves as 
Principal of the Primary School at Hanscom. 

In an era of great shortage of teachers, Lincoln 
has been most fortunate in attracting and keeping an out- 
standing faculty. This has been due in part to the 
quality of administrative leadership. Equally important 
have been the "General Conditions of Teaching" as deter- 
mined by class size, the respect of the community toward 
teaching and teachers, and the adequacy of equipment and 
supplies. The policy of a merit salary program, fairly 
administered, is apparently pleasing to the type of 
teacher who can grow with the Lincoln Schools. Data for 
teachers ' salaries from 1957 to 1966 are shown in Table 
II. 

Table II 

Salaries for Teachers 1957-1966 
Actual, not a stated range, on January of Calendar Year 



Year 


Minimum 


Maximum 


*Average 


1957 


$3,350 


$5,390 


$3,991 


1958 


3,350 


5,700 


4,152 


1959 


3,900 


6,600 


4,742 


1960 


4,000 


7,200 


4,945 



160 



Year 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 



Minimum 


Maximum 


*Average 


$4,000 


$7,700 


$5,202 


4,000 


8,100 


5,503 


4,500 


8,900 


6,070 


4,700 


9,800 


6,081 


4,800 


10,200 


6,465 



5,500 



11,200 



7,160 



* The average and median salaries are approxi- 
mately the same. 

Salaries in the Lincoln Schools are in the top 
group for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Other facts which indicate the attraction for teach- 
ing in Lincoln are the approximately 1000 candidates who 
applied in 1966 for 12 teaching vacancies in the Lincoln 
Schools and 17 at Hanscom. Moreover, of the thirty- 
three teachers who were the faculty of the Lincoln Schools 
in 1957, eleven were still here in 1966. One of these, 
Mrs. Augusta Sisk, Director of Testing, retired in June, 
1966. 

Some highlights of educational policy that have been 
activated during the past decade will be listed in chron- 
ological order. In 1957, a merit salary plan for teach- 
ers and a summer workshop for curriculum development 
were in their first year. A full-time science teacher- 
supervisor was added to the faculty. Plans for a school 
library were begun. With the appointment of a full-time 
school librarian in 1958, a five-year program to reach 
the American Library Association's minimum standards was 
undertaken. In that same year there was a major step 
forward with the introduction of a reading program based 
on the Spalding and Gillingham Alphabetic Phonetic meth- 
od. The summer school began remedial and enrichment 
classes. Instruction in French became a part of the 
regular school curriculum and musical education was en- 
hanced by the appointment of a full time supervisor of 
music. Efforts were made to improve communication with 
the citizens of the Town by the inauguration of the Wea- 
thervane and by the institution of an open hearing on the 



161 



School budget prior to the annual Town Meeting. 

In 1959 the School Committee assumed responsibility 
for the new elementary school complex at the L. G. Hans- 
corn Field under a yearly contract with the United States 
Office of Education. Instruction in modern mathematics 
began with the Yale mathematics program. Educational 
television became a factor for enrichment in the curricu- 
lum. Ungraded or non-graded classes were started in the 
Primary School. 1960 saw the consolidation and ad- 
vancement of the innovations mentioned previously with 
the introduction of the team- teaching concept. A stated 
policy was issued that our goal was to develop a curri- 
culum and a tempo of teaching which would maintain a del- 
icate balance between the ability of each individual 
child and the level of performance to be expected from 
him. 

A distinguished visitor series was inaugurated in 
1961 in order to provide a review of the Lincoln Schools 
by prominent educators and to stimulate the faculty with 
opportunities for exchange of ideas. The Lincoln 
Schools were beginning to gain national recognition for 
their success in ; educational experimentation as well as 
for emphasis on flexibility and the use of multipurpose 
teaching spaces. A school library at the Hanscom School 
and speech remediation were added in 1962, while in 1963 
there were still further efforts to meet the needs of 
each individual student in the development of new in- 
structional methods and curricular materials. 

In 1964, the professional attitude and stature of 
the faculty was advanced by the appointment of fourteen 
senior members to contracts for the full calendar year. 
Teaching in multidiscipline classes was started in an 
effort to coordinate material from different areas of 
education such as English and Social Studies. In the 
scheduling of classes, provision was made for periods of 
independent study for some pupils in the hope that a hab- 
it of self-education might be fostered. 1965 saw great- 
ly increased participation in the University-school pro- 
grams of Boston University and the Harvard Graduate 
School of Education. 

Coming to the current year, 1966, we call atten- 
tion to the Superintendent's report which details the 
major accomplishments. Of particular note is the sab- 
batical leave policy which became a reality when Dr. Bar- 

162 



bara Bennett, Miss Barbara Morris and Mr. Robert Filbin 
were granted opportunities for independent studies that 
lead to further professional growth and proficiency. 
Also, a long overdue, full-fledged guidance program came 
into being this year. Participation in the METCO pro- 
gram to bring a limited number of children from disadvan- 
taged areas of Boston to tne suburbs for the purpose of 
education appears to have been particularly successful 
in Lincoln. Although inclusion of kindergarten pupils 
in this program was not in the original plans, careful 
study by a number of dedicated Lincoln people indicated 
that this age group might be the most propitious. We 
believe that this is so. 

The policies of a -school committee are translated 
into tangible form by the budget. In Table III, there 
is shown a comparative breakdown of the per pupil costs 
over the last six years for salaries and all other costs. 

Table III 

Budget Per Pupil Cost 1961-1966 

Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget 
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 



* 
Categories 


10/1/60 
894 
Pupils 


10/1/61 
920 
Pupils 


10/1/62 
971 
Pupils 


10/1/63 

974 

Pupils 


10/1/64 
1006 
Pupils 


10/1/65 
1025 
Pupils 


Instruction 
Salaries 


$345 


$384 


$422 


$443 


$475 


$505 


All other 
Salaries 


47 


51 


49 


56 


64 


73 


Total 
Salaries 


392 


435 


471 


499 


539 


578 


All Other 
Costs 


133 


135 


132 


144 


155 


186 


Total Per 
Pupil Cost 


$525 


$570 


$603 


$643 


$694 


$764 



* Per pupil cost for a budget year is computed on basis 
of enrollment on October 1 of the preceding year. 



163 



It should be noted that there has been a very small in- 
crease above that resulting from inflationary pressures 
in the cost for operation and maintenance of plant, sup- 
plies and equipment. On the other hand, salaries and 
especially those for teachers, have risen considerably. 
This is as it should be if we believe that quality of edu- 
cation depends upon the quality of the people who provide 
it. 

This review of the Lincoln Schools over the past 
decade shows the development of concepts, philosophy, 
teaching techniques- and curriculum content which now are 
accepted widely as basic to modern education. The prog- 
ress has been great and has brought Lincoln into front 
ranks of elementary school systems of the United States. 
Yet there is no time for complacency. 

In the decade ahead, the School Committee, the ad- 
ministration and the faculty will have to work even hard- 
er to evaluate their position and consolidate gains. 
They will need to seek out, develop and adapt newer meth- 
ods that are appearing in increasing profusion. The 
citizens of the Town must be better informed of the pro- 
gram in education, of the pressure for additional space 
for physical education and libraries and of the expecta- 
tion of continuing raises in faculty salaries. The 
whole-hearted support of all will be needed by a school 
system that is striving constantly for continued excel- 
lence. 

In concluding this report, we would be most remiss 
if we did not express our gratitude to the various Town 
Boards and the many individual citizens who have given 
the School invaluable assistance in innumerable ways. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Robert L. Filbin 

It is almost ten years since Sputnik sent its wave 
of reaction throughout America and the American schools. 
During that time many pressures were brought to bear on 
the schools which had in some cases a very deleterious 
effect on the educational program. James Conant re- 
marked that after Sputnik something went out of American 
education that had been there before, and that was the 



164 



regard for young people. This was carried out to an ex- 
treme in the college admissions policies which were set 
so high that many young people who did meet the qualifi- 
cations were not admitted to colleges of their choice 
because there were so many others who could meet the qual 
ifications and there wasn't room for all of them. This 
inevitably had its effect on high school programs which 
were speeded up to meet the demands of college entrance, 
and elementary schools, as a result, were pressured into 
accelerating math and science programs to meet the needs 
of the high school. 

Americans have come to realize that while excel- 
lence in the sciences is important , the individual him- 
self and the development of his individual gifts and 
talents, whether they be in the area of the sciences, 
that of the arts and humanities, or that of the technical 
skills, is of equal importance. 

Changing conditions in our society which predict 
greater numbers of people, shorter working hours for 
many, the need of many who can perform technical skills, 
the need for ways of spending leisure time in a con- 
structive way, and the need for the realization that edu- 
cation will be a life process, are beginning to have 
their effect on all public and private education from 
primary school through college. 

The year 1966 saw many changes on the American 
educational scene. The Federal government with billions 
of dollars to spend on education exercised a wide degree 
of influence on American schools. The Lincoln Schools, 
with money made available to them, were involved in three 
projects: one under Title I, which was aimed at improving 
writing and spelling at the junior high school level; 
another designed to provide additional materials for the 
school libraries under the provisions of Title II; and 
another under Title III aimed at providing a regional 
supplementary instructional center in cooperation with 
the surrounding communities of Concord, Sudbury, Bedford, 
Framingham, Carlisle, Acton, Littleton and Maynard. This 
latter project is identified under the name of Liberty 
Council. Its purposes are to provide, on a joint bas- 
is, services which normally could not be provided by the 
individual school districts. One of these is conserva- 
tion education, to be developed jointly with the Massa- 
chusetts Audubon Society at Drumlin Farm. The purposes 

165 



of this program are to provide instructors in conserva- 
tion education to member school districts. Other ser- 
vices will relate to instructional materials and ser- 
vices for special education. 

1966 also marked the completion and opening of a 
new primary school at Hanscom Field. This building, con- 
structed by the Federal Government with planning done in 
conjunction with the Lincoln School administration and 
staff consists of three units, comprising eleven rooms 
for regular classroom instruction, plus a large gymnasium 
complete with shower facilities and offices to serve the 
upper school. Extensive remodeling of the existing 
school cafeteria provides room for serving a larger num- 
ber of pupils. 

Another project carried out with the aid of funds 
under Public Law 864 was the remodeling of a room at 
Brooks School into an additional science room. 'Origin- 
ally four science rooms were planned at Brooks School. 
Two of these were completed at the time the building was 
constructed. Two remained as "shells" for future devel- 
opment. The Town of Lincoln will receive approximately 
50% of the cost of the remodeling expense. The room 
will provide more adequate science laboratory space for 
the 365 pupils at Brooks School. 

Continued effort has been made to coordinate the 
programs of the elementary schools and the Lincoln-Sud- 
bury Regional High School. The superintendents have 
been meeting on a monthly basis as well as the school 
principals. There have been inter-school visits by 
classroom teachers and joint in-service education pro- 
grams for the staff, notably in the area of mathematics 
instruction. In addition, a joint survey of the music 
program in the three school systems was conducted by 
Beatrice Landeck, noted music education consultant. As 
a result of this survey the combined music staffs are 
meeting together to discuss and suggest ways of better 
coordination. It is hoped that similar surveys will be 
conducted in the near future in other subject matter 
areas. 

The sabbatical leave policy of the School Committee 
was put into effect for the first time in 1966, when Dr. 
Barbara Bennett, Director of Music, took sabbatical leave 
from January through June to make an extensive survey 

166 



throughout the United States and Europe of new movements 
in music education. Dr. Bennett was followed in Septem- 
ber by Superintendent Robert Filbin and Miss Barbara 
Morris of Hanscom School who began sabbatical leaves 
which will end in June of 1967. Mr. Filbin is conduct- 
ing educational research in the Institute of Administra- 
tive Research at Columbia University where he is a Paul 
Mort Fellow, completing the residence requirement for 
the doctorate degree. Miss Morris is at Boston Univer- 
sity pursuing a program in elementary school Social Stud- 
ies and completing the requirements for the Master's de- 
gree. Mr. Filbin returns to Lincoln at least twice a 
month to meet with the school committee, the staff and 
the superintendents of the Sudbury Elementary and Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High* Schools, and to attend to other 
school business. Mr. Drake, Administrative Assistant, 
is Acting Superintendent during Mr. Filbin' s absence. 

Scheduled to go on sabbatical leave in January of 
1967 is Mrs. Frances Doughty, Librarian at Hanscom School. 
Mrs. Doughty will be working on an extensive bibliography 
of science books for use in the schools. 

The Lincoln Schools, along with those of Newton, 
Wellesley, Lexington, Arlington, Braintree, and Brookline, 
participated in the M.E.T.C.O. plan to bring children 
from economically deprived homes in Boston to the suburbs 
for purposes of education. With funds made available by 
the Carnegie Foundation and the Stern Family Fund, ten 
children from Boston have been attending the kindergarten 
at Hartwell School. Working with a Citizens' Committee, 
appointed by the School Committee, consisting of Dr. 
Virginia Senders, "Mrs. Jean Stoudt, Mrs. Gwen Morgan, Mr. 
Henry Outten, and Mr. Alvin Levin, the school administra- 
tion and staff have been in close touch with the families 
of the children and every effort has been made to involve 
the children in those aspects of community life which are 
so important. According to the teaching staff, the 
children have adjusted well to the daily ride back and 
forth from Boston and to the school program. Their dai- 
ly attendance has been excellent. A detailed report of 
the M.E.T.C.O. program will be given at the Annual Town 
Meeting in March by the school committee. 

Initiated this year for the first time was a guid- 
ance program headed by Mr. Philip Reddy', Director of 
Guidance and Pupil Services. Appointed as part time 
psychologist was Mrs. Muriel Weckstein. Both of these 

167 



staff members come to the Lincoln Schools with excellent 
preparation and experience. In addition to providing 
counseling services to children, parents and teachers, 
the Guidance Department holds weekly meetings with nur- 
ses, speech therapists, remedial reading staff and other 
key personnel to coordinate the guidance and counseling 
services. Both guidance staff members are shared on an 
equal basis with Han scorn School. 

The staff continues to seek ways of meeting the in- 
dividual needs of children. With the further develop- 
ment of audio-visual materials and techniques aimed at 
helping the child to be more independent in many learn- 
ing tasks, it is becoming easier to accomplish this im- 
portant task. The use of computers to make available 
great banks of knowledge has been used in some school 
systems already on an experimental basis. By use of a 
dialing technique the child has direct access to know- 
ledge which can be used directly without waiting for it 
to be relayed in the usual way. It is inevitable that 
the computer will become an important adjunct to the edu- 
cational programs of school systems throughout the United 
States and the usual methods of teaching will have to be 
re-examined in the light of these changes. 

In terms of meeting the needs of individual child- 
ren the schools from the primary level on up have sought 
to determine the special talents, abilities and interests 
of the children. Open blocks of time have been scheduled 
where children can elect to participate in one of many 
different activities such as art, music, physical educa- 
tion, science, etc. The children have responded enthu- 
siastically to this idea and it is felt by the staff that 
many are gaining a great deal from it. 

The program in outdoor education developed over the 
past few years by Director of Physical Education Albert 
Reed, with the assistance of many staff members, has be- 
come outstanding in terms of developing in children an 
understanding and appreciation of our natural resources. 
From a survival experience in a forest, using the most 
simple resources to cope with the situation, to observing 
and gathering sea life on the New England coast, the child- 
ren in both Brooks and Hanscom School have been exposed 
to carefully planned activities which bring them close to 
nature in a meaningful way. 



168 



During the course of the year the school committee 
and the professional staff re-examined the philosophy and 
objectives of the schools and arrived at a statement 
whi ch f o 1 lows : 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES OF LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

1. We believe that each child has the right to 
participate in the joys and disappointments 
of becoming a human being who cares how he 
leads his life. To that end, our responsi- 
bility is to provide a school which will: 

- help each child develop a positive, 
realistic self-concept flexible 
enough to serve him in a changing 
world; 

- nurture and reinforce in each child 
those qualities of human dignity 
which lead to personal integrity; 

- encourage each child to formulate 
his unique identity, purpose, and 
commitment. 

2. We believe each human being has a responsi- 
bility to so live his life that he contri- 
butes but does not intrude upon the rights 
of others. Thus it is our responsibility: 

- to establish and insist upon reason- 
able standards for conduct which will 
encourage self-control and self-dis- 
cipline in each child; 

- to help each child develop a sense 
that he can, should, and will contri- 
bute to his society; 

- to help each child develop respect 
for the contribution of others. 

3. We believe that each child's talents deserve 
our respect, and our maximum efforts of in- 
spiration and encouragement for development. 
Thus we would nurture excellence by providing 



169 



situations to produce appropriate stimula- 
tion of: 

- ability to think critically; 

- intellectual curiosity and com- 
petence; 

- creative individual self-expression; 
(mental and physical) 

- children's taste in fine and applied 
arts. 

4. We believe that in order to attain these ob- 
jectives we should make every effort to recog- 
nize and analyze individual differences in 
children's experiences, intellectual develop- 
ment, personal qualities, special aptitudes, 
abilities and goals, and proceed to meet -these 
differences with appropriate methods of in- 
struction. 



Such a philosophy and objectives which are de- 
signed to emphasize the creative development of individ- 
ual children in order to prepare them to live in and 
build the responsible society is our ultimate goal. 



PRINCIPALS, HARTWELL, SMITH AND BROOKS SCHOOLS 

(Mrs.) Joan Warren, Principal, Hartwell Primary School 
Stefan Vogel, Principal, Smith Middle School 
Timothy Rhodes, Principal, Brooks Upper School 

HARTWELL SCHOOL 

Staff 

Hartwell School opened its doors in September 1966 
with twenty full-time and one part-time teacher. Two 
of these teachers are new to Lincoln and represent re- 
placements; but both have previous experience. In addi- 
tion, there are seven faculty members shared with other 
schools, working in the areas of music, art, math, sci- 

170 



ence, speech and guidance. Four student teachers from 
Boston University started in September and it is expected 
that the number of Boston University students will in- 
crease second semester and that Lesley College student 
teachers will also be working with the Hartwell faculty. 

Near the end of October two teacher aides were 
added to our staff. They work on a part time basis 
four days a week and assist the teachers in such areas as 
recess duty, working with individual or small groups of 
children under a teacher's supervision, preparing art 
materials, changing bulletin boards and a variety of oth- 
er tasks which help to free a teacher for more meaningful 
work with children. 

Building Utilization 

September 1966 brought some major changes in use 
of space at Hartwell School. The main building now 
houses the children in Teams B and G. In addition to 
the library, we have the Resource Room which houses the 
professional book collection for the main campus, audio 
visual equipment (available to teachers in this room or 
their own rooms) which the librarian is now responsible 
for, samples of latest text books (reading, math, etc.) 
for staff perusal, and a "story rug" upon which children 
sit when Mrs. Tonseth is telling a story. One room has 
been set up as a music room where Miss Williams meets 
some of her classes. The Orff instruments and other 
materials can be left set up which is one of the main ad- 
vantages of this arrangement. The audio-visual room is 
used by groups of children to view filmstrips or movies. 
This room is also available for small group work and pro- 
vides office space (desk and files) for our math, science, 
speech and guidance specialists. 

Unit A houses the art room used by all pupils in 
this school and the sixty pupils and three teachers in 
Team W, our multi-aged team of six, seven and eight year 
olds. Unit B, which formerly housed Team G, now con- 
tains the six year olds of Team Y and their four teach- 
ers. Unit C houses the four five year old classes and 
the three teachers of Team R. 

Organization 

As a further extension of non-grading, our first 
multi-aged team of six, seven and eight year olds, called 

171 



Team W, was begun in September, 1966. Sixty children 
(approximately twenty from each age group) are housed in 
two middle rooms of Unit A. The wall can be pushed open 
to make one large classroom when the need arises. The 
flexibility of this unit provides much opportunity for 
regrouping children as the need demands. Science and 
social studies are taught in the multi-aged groupings or 
the children may be variously grouped for particular 
skills to be learned. Language, arts and arithmetic 
groups are more or less homogeneous depending on the 
achievement level of the pupils. Provision has been 
made for these Team W pupils to play during recess time 
with children of their own age group who are in other 
teams. 

Eight teachers work with the children in Teams B 
and G. All eight teach language arts. Four specialize 
in math (each teaching two groups) and four comprise the 
social studies-science team of teachers (also teaching 
two groups each) . At this writing, the seven and eight 
year olds are multi-aged for their social studies-science 
class and provision is made for other groupings in the 
skills areas when necessary. The pupils are grouped by 
achievement level in the areas of language arts and math. 

The three teachers in Team R have two groups each 
this year. Team Y is operating more or less as in the 
past with the children grouped heterogeneously for home- 
room (social studies, science, art, music, physical edu- 
cation taught in these groupings) and more or less homo- 
geneously by achievement in the areas of language arts 
and math. 

Cooperative planning on the part of the staff con- 
tinues as an essential aspect in this organization. Daily 
communication between teachers about children is con- 
sidered of paramount importance. 

Instruction 

Summer School - Nineteen children attended the 
four week summer session for instruction in the language 
arts area. The following projects were worked on: 

1 - Planning and organization for Team W. 

2 - Scheduling for all teams. 

172 



3 - Reorganization of reading materials for 

entire school. 

4 - Start in building materials for individual- 

izing instruction. 

5 - Reorganization of math material and addi- 

tional work in curriculum. 

6 - Planning in area of social studies for first 

year of a proposed three year cycle. 

7 - Work on music curriculum. In addition, 

Miss Williams worked with a multi-aged 
group of children using Orff materials. 
This enabled her to evaluate and plan for 
coming year. 

8 - Work in library. Mrs. Tonseth was avail- 

able for two weeks to help organize Resource 
Room and sit in on planning sessions with 
staff particularly in the area of social 
studies. 

In-Service Education 

Math Committee. 

Beginning of English Committee. 

One session for K-5 teachers by music department. 

Future Plans 

We constantly strive for better ways of helping 
children learn. With this in mind an evaluation of our 
multi-aged team will be made in the spring to determine 
the strengths and weaknesses of this organization. All 
faculty members welcome parent comments on any aspect of 
our program for it is only through close home- school com- 
munication we can truly educate children. The staff 
and principal are deeply appreciative of the strong sup- 
port of the community and school committee. 



173 



SMITH SCHOOL 

Staff 

The Smith School has a full-time faculty of eleven 
teachers, three of whom represent replacements. An 
additional sixteen persons drawn on a shared basis from 
other schools in Lincoln service the Smith Middle School 
in the following areas: French, art, music, science, 
physical education, library, health, guidance, reading, 
mathematics, and speech. Many of these persons act as 
consultants as well as teachers. 

Four student teachers from Boston University are 
currently assigned to the school. 

Building Utilization 

Two hundred and forty-seven children use nine reg- 
ular classrooms in Smith School and two special purpose 
rooms. The South Lobby is used both as a regular class- 
room and large-group area, and the old music room is now 
serving as a temporary library for the Middle School. 
In Smith, the gymnasium and room 5 are shared with Brooks 
School on a regularly scheduled basis, and the auditorium 
and lecture hall at Brooks are used by students in the 
Middle School. 

Organization 

The 1966 school year reflects basic improvement of 
the non-graded program at Smith School. As a result of 
an in-depth faculty study during the 1965-66 school year, 
which included discussion of the Harvard University Sur- 
vey (see Town Report 1965) , the faculty of the Middle 
School took a first step in eliminating the age barriers 
between Teams and N. 

This organization, which was explained in detail by 
the principal to parents of Middle Schoolers, is based on 
the notion of continuous progress; i.e., that a child is 
able to progress through school according to his own 
ability and learning rate, rather than according to some 
arbitrary, fixed standard which does not allow for the 
wide variance in children's abilities. Accordingly, age 
becomes less a determining factor in the placement of 
children in classes than achievement. As teachers 



174 



studied the problem, a greater need was found for flexi- 
ble arrangements of classes and staffing. In observing 
non-graded programs in other schools an additional argu- 
ment was heard for the benefits to children in classes 
not organized according to age level. The argument 
states essentially that children grouped in mixed-age 
classes develop healthier outlooks on themselves and 
their relationships with the world; the child is in a 
more natural, "family" kind of environment. 

The organization of the Smith Middle School attempts 
to accommodate both the elimination of age barriers and 
greater flexibility. All children are in homerooms com- 
posed half each of 9 and 10 year olds, who are instructed 
in these groups in music, art, physical education, social 
studres and science. 

Individual learning rates and achievement levels 
determine the grouping of classes in reading, mathematics, 
and language arts. Only some of these classes, then, 
are mixed in age. 

The team-teaching approach continues with teachers 
specializing in three subject areas. Teachers in sub- 
ject teams meet regularly to plan, to share experiences, 
and to evaluate, in mathematics, language arts, social 
studies and science. In reading and mathematics, the 
services of part-time consultants are available. 

The faculty as a whole meets regularly. Taken 
together, all of these meetings serve to provide formal 
coordination and communication about students, philosophy, 
curriculum and method. 

Instruction 

Summer Session - 

A total of twelve children from the Middle School 
were enrolled in remedial classes in reading, spelling 
and mathematics. The following faculty members from the 
Smith Middle School worked either full or part-time during 
July, 1966: Mrs. Phyllis McKenney, Miss Ann Zanghi, Mrs. 
Susan Perls, Mr. Joseph Lessard, and Mr. Robert Cummings. 

The principal task of the summer school was the 
working out of the details of the decision 'to remove the 

175 



age barriers between teams. The master schedule was 
developed, students grouped, and teachers assigned. In 
curriculum, the following projects were accomplished: 
centralization of subject files, outlines for the year's 
work, text-inventory, preparation of materials for teach- 
ing, and in some areas, correlation with other subjects 
worked out. 

In-Service Education 

Teachers in the Middle School meet at least twice 
a month with specialists in the areas of reading, spell- 
ing and mathematics in order to evaluate continuously, 
and to improve instruction. 

A major study committee at Smith is working to eval- 
uate the new non-graded approach, and will be surveying 
students, parents and teachers in the spring of 1967 as 
part of the evaluation. 

In the fall, teachers in the Middle School attended 
a series of joint workshops in mathematics held with the 
Sudbury Public Schools as part of an effort to coordinate 
the two school systems, and to improve mathematics in- 
struction. 

Future Plans 

The Smith School faculty constantly is asked to con- 
sider ways of improving instruction. Among the more im- 
portant approaches being analyzed is that of individual- 
ized instruction. Individualized programs are being 
carried out to some extent currently in reading, spelling 
and mathematics. A high degree of sophistication is 
needed for programs such as these to work well, and the 
refinement of individualized teaching plans is a goal to 
which the staff is committed. 

Some modification and refinement of the non-graded 
approach is expected for the fall of 1967 as a result of 
the planned evaluation to take place in the spring. How- 
ever, at this writing, the acceptance of the program by 
students, parents and teachers indicates its probable 
continuation in the future as a basic educational ap- 
proach. 



176 



BROOKS SCHOOL 

The Brooks School staff consists of 28 teachers, 
three of whom are system wide directors and two of whom 
are shared with other schools. Three teachers were 
new this year; one a replacement; the other two were new 
positions. 

There have been 12 home rooms for the three grades 
6, 7 , and 8, and most instruction is done in 18 groups, 
though on occasion the number varies from 16 to 20. 

There are 13 standard classrooms and half time use 
of the 14th room shared with the Middle School. With 
tight scheduling, these rooms plus the special rooms for 
art, music, shop, home economics and gym accommodate the 
classes most of the time. But a fair number of classes 
have to be held nevertheless in the lecture room and 
some even in the auditorium, which detracts from the 
proper use of these rooms. 

Pupils are grouped for instruction by grades; and 
each grade is composed of three X groups moving at an 
average speed over standard material and three Y groups 
moving faster usually over somewhat more difficult mater- 
ial. But the difference is never such that a pupil can- 
not be moved from an X group to a Y group or vice versa, 
and changes occur frequently. In Mathematics and French 
the grouping is more homogeneous. There are six separ- 
ate levels of Math in each grade and four or five in 
French. 

Study skills which started out as an alternative to 
French has become more fully defined as a subject and 
with Federal help under Title I has been developing new 
techniques to improve verbal skills. As serious read- 
ing disability hardly exists any more in children who 
have come up through the Lincoln Schools, the type of 
reading help given is along the lines of organizing and 
remembering what is read. It is the writing skills 
that claim a lot of attention. This means both the or- 
ganization of writing and also on a simpler level the 
skills of spelling and punctuation. For these funda- 
mental mechanics of writing, special typewriters have 
been introduced that have special color-coded lower case 
lettering of the keys. These, either used alone or in 



177 



connection with programmed drills supplied from tapes 
through earphones, open up new possibilities of teaching 
and reinforcing spelling rules that need attention. 

To balance the emphasis on subjects that comes with 
departmentalization a system of pupil advisers was in- 
stituted, each teacher becoming the adviser to a small 
number of children. Assignments of adviser were made 
mostly on the basis of the preference of the pupil. And, 
as another move away from classroom over-emphasis, school 
assemblies have been held more often; assemblies that are 
largely pupil operated. 

Summer School 

Miss Jones and Mr. Jorgensen worked on the develop- 
ment of experimental apparatus and on problems of inven- 
tory and storage of existing equipment. 

Mrs. Paranya and Mrs. Mahoney worked with Mrs., Sund- 
berg of Hanscom on developing an outline of a new lin- 
guistics-oriented English curriculum for grades 6, 7, and 
8. 

Mrs. Stonehill, Mrs. Howard and Mr. Potter of the 
Smith faculty, operated the study skills summer school 
and kept very busy developing the exercises that the new 
mechanical techniques required. 

Mrs. Horn worked on inventory and schedule. 

Mrs. Reid worked as Chairman of the Junior High 
School level of a federally funded research project en- 
titled "Joint Research Project in the New Media for Music 
Education". The group developed two packets of material 
on Bartok and Stravinsky, respectively, which will be 
used in eighth grade classes in Lincoln. These packets 
are overhead projectuals to be used in conjunction with 
accompanying tape recordings. 

Future Plans 

The Brooks School intends to look carefully into 
the matter of what should be the fifth major course, and 
will probably expand the present French or Study Skills 
alternative to include at some level or levels also Lat- 
in, Personal Typing, and possibly Mechanical Drawing. 



178 



Such an array would be offered on an elective-selective 
basis. That is pupils could choose any course if their 
chance of success in it was good. 



HANSCOM SCHOOL 

Robert A. Leach, Head Principal 

Timothy Graves, Principal, Primary School 

Implementation of organizational changes and ad- 
justment to new classroom facilities have keynoted the 
educational program of the Hanscom School complex this 
year. 

Building Utilization 

The two new primary units were opened this fall to 
house the six, seven and eight year olds. Kindergarten 
classes have been at Center School as there is still in- 
adequate space at Hanscom Complex. The flexibility of 
the teaching areas in the new buildings has proven most 
effective. The amount of space now available for the 
Kindergarten children has aided in the improvement of 
the education of these five year olds. 

A new gymnasium designed for use by Upper School 
children, and various community groups, was opened in 
September along with enlarged cafeteria facilities. The 
Complex now consists of four separate buildings. 

Staff 

The present staff of the Primary School includes 20 
classroom teachers, a librarian, art specialist, music 
specialist, and three shared specialists in physical ed- 
ucation, reading and science. Nine new staff members 
have been added to replace vacancies. Six of this num- 
ber have had previous teaching experience. The Primary 
School has also had two teacher aides for two hours per 
day whose duties have been supervision of recess and 
cafeteria, clerical work within the teams, and assistance 
to teachers within the teams and assistance to teachers 
within the classrooms. Eight student teachers from Bos- 
ton University and four from Lesley College have gained 



179 



practical experience from being involved in the Primary 
and Middle Schools. 

Over all, the staff at Hanscom totals 62 profession- 
al members and 20 persons assigned to the school offices, 
cafeteria and custodial staffs. 

Instructional 

Language Arts and Mathematics have continued to be 
grouped by homogeneous achievement levels. Science and 
Social Studies are heterogeneously grouped. The Art 
and Music Specialists have flexible schedules which al- 
low them to work with one team or teacher for extended 
periods of time. 

The Primary School is most proud of its new library 
and pupil resources program. A strong emphasis is be- 
ing placed on audio-visual materials such as records and 
film strips. Individual pupils are able to operate 
film strip viewers or phonographs in the listening view- 
ing booths without disturbing the rest of the class. 

The Middle School, reorganized this year as a multi- 
aged, non-graded group, has been taught by a single team 
of nine teachers, under the direction of Mrs. Robert Bow- 
den, team leader. Emphasis is on continuous progress 
for individual children through nine levels of ability, 
encompassing our nine and ten-year-old children. 

The Upper School has been organized into a semi- 
multi-aged situation, with former "sixth and seventh 
graders" being grouped together in homerooms but attend- 
ing academic classes by ability level groupings. All 
students attend special subject classes in multi-aged 
groups. (The exception this year is our third year, or 
eighth grade, students who function as a single age- 
group unit. ) 

Summer School 

Forty-two children attended summer school for read- 
ing and thirty- four for mathematics. The difficult job 
of creating a flexible schedule for a team teaching sit- 
uation was also accomplished. The third primary accom- 
plishment of the summer session was the organization of 



180 



the new primary units for opening of school in Septem- 
ber. 

Future Plans 

Close cooperation between the Kindergarten (at 
Center School) and the rest of the Primary School has 
been difficult to maintain this year because of the 
physical separation. Approximately 20 children have 
needed the experience of both the Kindergarten and the 
facilities at the Hanscom Complex. Hopefully, there 
will be room to house Kindergarten classes at the Hans- 
com Complex in the near future. 

It is felt that a need also exists for additional 
facilities for classrooms and special class facilities 
(science, art, music) for the Upper School, as the in- 
put from the Middle and Primary School increases. 

The present school population (in the vicinity of 
850 children) has not reached our predicted estimate 
this year, for various reasons, including the Viet Nam 
situation. However, a slow but continued growth may 
be expected when the situation is stabilized. 



SCHOOL NURSE 

Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 

In September all children were weighed and measured 
with the assistance of Mrs. Torode, Miss Yeamans, Mr. 
Reed and Mr. Saia, our physical education instructors. 
As I have noted in previous reports, malnutrition is not 
a problem in the Lincoln Schools, but every year there 
are a few children with overweight problems. In the 
Smith and Hartwell Schools we continue to stress the 
need for the mid-morning fruit break. Many children 
start the day with a light breakfast eaten at an early 
hour and lunch time will not come before noon. We have 
found that the mid-morning fruit followed by recess 
brightens everybody up, and attention and behavior in 
the classroom is greatly improved. 

Children entering kindergarten had the state re- 
quired physical examination and smallpox vaccination. 
The majority were seen by their own family doctors. 

181 



Fourteen kindergarten examinations were done by Dr. John 
Davies at the Well Child Conference. 

In November and December school wide dental screen- 
ing was done by Dr. William Tingey; 2 34 children were 
referred to family dentists for treatment and orthodon- 
tia. 

During the fall and winter the annual vision and 
hearing testing was done with the help of trained volun- 
teers. There were 21 final hearing failures, and 54 
vision failures. Many of these are children with known 
vision and hearing difficulties, who are already under 
a doctor's supervision. The new cases are discussed 
with their parents and referred for medical diagnosis 
and correction. 

In April the annual tuberculin testing at the 6 
year old level was done by Dr. John Sis son; 77 children 
were tested. There were no positive reactors. 

During the year two movies were shown as part of 
the health education program for adolescent girls. They 
were "You're a Young Lady Now" and "It's Wonderful Being 
a Girl". Also as part of the health education program 
the 5th grade boys and girls saw a movie and had a talk 
about dental care, and the 7th and 8th grades were shown 
the movie "Hemo the Magnificent", which is the story of 
blood and its circulation, and combines information with 
entertainment, while presenting a complex, interesting 
subject. 

Several meetings were held with Dr. Sisson, our 
school doctor, and the school nurses and principals from 
both the Hanscom and Lincoln Schools on the subject of 
health instruction. We hope to initiate a more compre- 
hensive program next year. 

The after school sports program continues to be 
very popular, and there is a good turnout especially in 
the spring and fall. The girls play hockey in the fall, 
basketball in the winter and softball in the spring. The 
boys have soccer, basketball and baseball. In mid-win- 
ter, after the basketball season in Smith and Brooks 
Schools, the children have calisthenics and use the 
equipment, i.e., ropes, ladders, trampoline, etc. 



182 



Again this year I wish to thank my splendid volun- 
teers for the services they have given to the school 
health program. I am especially grateful to Mrs. Stan- 
ley Tead and Mrs. David Ammen, without whose efficiency 
and enthusiasm it would have been difficult to complete 
some of the programs. 



183 



CLASS CF 1966 



Ramelle Frost Adams 

Eve Aschenbrenner 

Susan Bastress 

Carol Bergen 

Walter Bonia 

Thomas Nicker son Brown 

Lea Christine Bulkley 

Lindsay Sherman Burk 

John Bradley Caswell 

Roger Christie 

John Hsi en-Ming Chu 

Stephen Comstock 

Colleen Conley 

Kathy Crowe 

Paula Cunningham 

Earl Daniels 

Patricia W. Dean 

Edward James Denehy II 

Susan Linda Denisevich 

Elizabeth Heberton Donaldson 

Donald Dwight Douty 

Cynthia Dustin 

Juliana Eckhardt 

Linda Elaine Elliott 

Ann Marie Eppling 

James John Fa ran V 

Dan Fedock 

Joyce Louise Fillmore 

Trevor J. Fougere 

Barbara Jean Gagne 

Janet Gary 

Judith Jean Gentile 

Zita Elaine Gilbert 

Faye B. Gilfoy 

Elizabeth Gordon 

John E. Gray 

Debra Green 

Thomas Bradbury Gross 

James Guy 

Geoffrey Field Herman 

Constant Keller Haden 

Mark Joseph Hagenian 

Mona Halsey 

Richard Hall 



William C. Hankey III 

Linnea Hanson 

George Haroutunian 

Ellen Harney 

Susan Hunter Henderson 

Cynthia Denise Hyde 

Robert Wallace Jevon, Jr. 

Bruce E. H. Johnson 

Deborah Kaelber 

Charles Keevil 

Anne Kelley 

Scott Kennedy 

Laurie-Ellen Kessel 

Clemens Andres Kessler 

Laura Keyes 

Sharon Kling 

Karen Lankhorst 

Robert Laverty 

Robert John Leger 

Katherine Levin 

Allison Lindsay 

Ellen Hutchinson Lummus 

Lisa Jane Lustwerk 

Roland MacKenzie 

John Mahoney 

Kathy Mahoney 

Frederick Mannarino 

Bradley Philip Martin 

Max Mason 

Dorothy B. Mead 

Linda Messina 

Steven Mickle 

Joseph Morette 

Mark Moynihan 

Joseph Anthony Murphy 

Judith Ann Murphy 

Christine Theres'e Myles 

Christine Ellen Nelson 

Barbara Ellen Nesto 

Patricia M. Neville 

Nathaniel William Niles II 

Carol Edith Novak 

Deborah L. Page 

Lawrence Page 



184 



Judith Andrea Paino 
Maureen Panetta 
Richard Jackson Parker 
Benjamin Redway Pierce 
Kenneth Podsen 
William Rappoli 
John Winslow Reece 
Katrina Robeck 
Wendy H. Rolfe 
Joseph J. Ruocco 
Bruce Ryer 

Thomas Francis Sartori 
Mallory G. R. Selfridge 



Catherine Crocker Sharpe 
David Stevens 
Jennifer Stevens 
Michael Stubbins 
Linda Tetreault 
Beth Weckstein 
Eric Alan Williams 
Marilyn Wood 
Robert Wilson 
Bruce Winchell 
Stephen Lee Wright 
Carolyn Marie Venier 
Kathleen A. Yore 



185 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1967 



Classification 



1966 Budget 1966 Expenses 1967 Budget 
Requested 



ADMINISTRATION 

School Committee Exp. 



Adm. 



Salaries, Sup't 

Ass't., Sec'y's. 
Office & Supt's. Exp 



OUT OF STATE TRAVEL 



$ 1,400.00) 
*175.00) 

27,296.00 

2,425.00 

$ 31,296.00 

$ 2,100.00) 
*375.00 ) 
$ 2,475.00 



$ 1,722.05 $ 1,575.00 



24,422.52 
2,516.87 



30,825.00 



$ 28,661.44 $ 35,700.00 
$ 2,055.90 $ 2,500.00 



$ 2,055.90 $ 2,500.00 



INSTRUCTION 
Salaries 
Summer Workshop 
Textbooks 
Library 
Supplies & Other Exp, 

Transferred to 
Oper. & Maint. 

Transferred to Acq. 
of Fixed Assets 



$512,363.00 

5,650.00 

4,100.00 

3,404.00 

24,985.00 

$550,502.00 





$550,502.00 


OTHER SCHOOL SERVICES 




Health 


$ 1,100.00 


Transportation 


48,362.00 


Bus Monitors 


2,940.00 




$ 52,402.00 


OPERATION & MAINT. OF 


PLANT 


Custodial Salaries 


$ 48,000.00 


Fuel & Utilities 


39,600.00 


Supplies & Drayage 


4,700.00 


Maintenance 


18,013.00) 




*2, 000.00) 




$112,313.00 


Transferred from 




Instruction 






$112,313.00 


ACQUISITION OF 




FIXED ASSETS 


$ 11,420.00) 




*20,864.35) 




$ 32,284.35 


Transferred from 




Instruction 





$569,268.00 

6,632.00 

5,530.00 

4,581.00 

30,998.00 

$617,009.00 



$502,681.57 

6,632.00 

4,594.19 

3,902.55 

24,637.77 

$542,448.08 

1,010.65 

1,813.92 

$545,272.65 $617,009.00 



$ 47.46 $ 100.00 

47,199.48 49,950.00 

2,477.03 4,500.00 

$ 49,723.97 $ 54,550.00 



$ 48,514.42 $ 53,600.00 

35,761.27 40,100.00 

6,249.69 5,800.00 

22,798.27 25,964.00 



$113,323.65 $125,464.00 
(1,010.65 ) 



$112,313.00 $125,464.00 



$ 34,098.27 $ 11,746.00 



$ 32,284.35 



$ 34,098.27 $ 11,746.00 
(1,813.92 ) 



$ 32,284.35 $ 11,746.00 



(cont. ) 
186 



Classification 1966 Budget 1966 Expenses 1967 Budget 
Requested 

PROGRAMS WITH OTHER 
SYSTEMS 

Tuition Special Class $ 1,800.00 $ 1,260.00 $ 3,700.00 
Tuition Adult 
Education 250.00 159.00 250.00 

$ 2,050.00 $ 1,419.00 $ 3,950.00 



GRAND TOTAL $759,908.00) $771,730.31 $850,919.00 

*23,414.35) 

Per Pupil Cost 764.22 752.91 809.63 

FROM SPECIAL FUNDS 44, 544.55 11, 754.04 

TOWN APPROPRIATION $738,777.80 $839,164.96 



* Added to proposed budget as it 
appears in Town Report 



187 



Name 



STAFF ROSTER, JANUARY 1, 1967 
Position 



Robert L. Filbin 

Superintendent of Schools 
(Principal, Hartwell School; 1958-1962; 
Principal, Smith School and Coordinator 
of Instruction, 1962-63) 



Appointed 
1963 



Joan B. Warren 

Stefan Vogel 
Timothy Rhodes 



Principal, Hartwell School 

(Teacher, 1951-1962 ; 

Acting Principal, 1962-1963! 

Principal, Smith School 
(Teacher, 1959-1963) 



Principal, Brooks School 



Timothy Graves 

Principal, Hanscom Primary School 

Robert A. Leach 

Principal, Hanscom Upper School 



George Drake 



Administrative Assistant 
(Teacher, 1954-1962) 



1963 

1963 

1965 

1965 

1959 
1962 



Josephine Alward 



Jane Anderson 
Judith Anderson 

*Olive Barr 
Johanna Bartelink 
Barbara Bennett 
Lance Berger 
Jane Berkowitz 

* Elizabeth Bjork 
Judith Black 
Rita Blackburn 
Sharon Bio omen thai 
Eleanor Bowden 



Chairman, North Team 
Assistant to Principal 

Middle Team 

Team B 

Home Eco nomi c s 

South Team 

Director of Music 

English, Social Studies 

Chairman, East Team 

Math Specialist 

Librarian 

Team R 

South Team 

Middle Team Leader 



1964 



1965 
1965 
1963 
1966 
1958 
1964 
1965 
1958 
1965 
1962 
1966 
1961 



188 



Name 



Position 



Appointed 



Suzanne Brassard 
Constance M. Brothers 
John F. Brown, Jr. 
Linda Burgess 
Gloria Butterfield 
Mary S. Butterfield 
Alfred Callahan 
John B. Carven, Jr. 
Mary E. Carey 
Roger A. Cederlund 
Francis S. Churchill 
David Clevenson 
Angela Cockfield 
Julie S. Cohen 
Paul M. Cohen 
Julia Cole 

Sarah G. Cotter 
Allyson B. Crawford 
Caryl Culp 
Robert A. Cummings 
Barbara Cunningham 
Judy T. Davis 
Susan Derby 
Frances Doughty 
Priscilla J. Dowd 
Robert C. Duncan 
Sylvia C. Feldman 
Ellen R. Franklin 
Nancy Frieden 
Nancy B. Glynn 
Carolyn Green 
Kenneth Greenblatt 
Susan B. Greeneisen 
Helen Guichelaar 
Ronald Hadge 

Ronald L. Hagopian 
Linda Holland 
Helen Horn 
Louise Howard 
Kathleen Hunter 
Patricia Hurley 
Fred Iosue 
Lucia Jezior 
Phyllis E. Johnson 



Science 


1966 


East Team 


1966 


Middle Team - Science 


1965 


Physical Education 


1965 


English, Social Studies 


1965 


Art 


1963 


Manual Arts 


1959 


Mathematics 


1965 


English, Social Studies 


1966 


Science 


1962 


Manual Arts 


1963 


Mathematics, Social Studies 


1965 


Middle Team 


1966 


Middle Team 


1965 


Social Studies 


1965 


Team B Leader 


1955 


Assistant to Principal 




Middle Team 


1964 


Team R 


1964 


North Team 


1964 


Middle Team 


1962 


North Team 


1965 


Mathematics, Science 


1966 


East Team 


1966 


Librarian 


1959 


Team Y 


1965 


Social Studies 


1965 


Mathematics, English 


1965 


Middle Team 


1965 


East Team 


1966 


East Team 


1966 


Middle Team 


1966 


Mathematics, Science 


1959 


South Team 


1965 


Team G 


1966 


Mathematics 


1959 


Assistant to Principal 




Physical Education 


1965 


Art 


1966 


Director of Art 


1959 


English, Social Studies 


1966 


Team Y 


1966 


Chairman, South Team 


1964 


Physical Education 


1959 


French 


1966 


Team B 


1946 



189 



Name 



Position 



Catherine Jones 
Meredith Jones 
Neil Jorgensen 
Joan Kessel 
Mary Kohring 
Dale Korman 
William Lehto 
Ann B. Lessard 
Joseph P. Lessard 
Beverley Lord 
Ruth Mahoney 
Gail K. Manners 
Candice Marshall 
Ann Matthews 
Robert McElwain 

♦Maureen McGrath 
Phyllis McKenney 
Margaret McWade 
Virginia Metzger 
Barbara Morris 
Jeanne Morrison 
Jean K. Murray 
Diane F. Nockles 
William A. Nockles 
Elizabeth Norden 
Bernard Oster 

*Marianne Palmer 
Ann Paranya 
Susan P # erls 
Margaret H. Permut 
Geoffrey Piece 
Benjamin C. Potter, 
Philip J. Reddy 

Albert Reed 

Sheila R. Reid 
Jane Rivkin 
Charlotte Rothstein 
*Adrienne Rubin 
George E. Saia, Jr. 
Doris Salak 
Martha Salisbury 
Mary Salvucci 
My ma Schreibman 



Appointed 



Librarian 


1959 


Science 


1965 


Science 


1961 


Kindergarten 


1965 


Team W 


1965 


East Team 


1966 


Mathematics, Science 


1966 


Team W Leader 


1959 


Middle Team 


1960 


French 


1965 


English 


1958 


Team B 


1965 


Home Economics, Guidance 


1965 


Science Specialist 


1966 


French 


1965 


Speech Therapist 


1966 


Middle Team 


1957 


Team G 


1964 


Kindergarten 


1966 


Social Studies 


1959 


Team Y 


1964 


Team W 


1964 


Team G Leader 


1956 


English, Social Studies 


1963 


Art 


1965 


Science, Mathematics 


1966 


Team B 


1964 


English Supervisor 


1949 


Middle Team 


1965 


South Team 


1965 


Art 


1966 


r. Middle Team 


1965 


Director of Guidance & 




Pupil Services 


1966 


Director of Physical 




Education 


1953 


Music 


1961 


French 


1966 


Reading Specialist 


1960 


Reading Consultant 


1959 


Physical Education 


1964 


Science 


1959 


Middle Team 


1966 


Home Economics 


1955 


Team G 


1963 



190 



Name 



Nola P. Sheffer 
Mary C. Small 
Jane H. Stewart 
Ellen Stonehill 
Gretchen Stubbins 
Florence Sullivan 
Ruth B. Sundberg 

*Ann F. Sutherland 
Robert Treanor 
Elizabeth Thompson 
Phebe Tonseth 
Lorraine To rode 
Michael Troderman 
Ronald Trudeau 
Susan Turkel 
Jan Ugan 
Joan Walker 
Joan McK. Walker 
Lila E. Wasson 
John Watson 

*Muriel Weckstein 
Rebekah Wells 

*Julie Wheelden 
Carol Williams 
Joan C. Wilson 
Peggy Wo 1 aver 
Claudia Wonitowy 
Kathleen S. Woodruff 
Ann Zanghi 
Lynne Yeamans 



Position 


Appointed 


North Team 


1965 


Chairman, Kindergarten 


1964 


Team R Leader 


1960 


English 


1965 


Team Leader Y 


1965 


Middle Team 


1963 


English 


1959 


French 


1961 


Art 


1964 


English, Social Studies 


1964 


Librarian 


1961 


Physical Education 


1960 


Middle Team 


1966 


Music 


1961 


Middle Team 


1966 


English, Social Studies 


1965 


Mathematics 


1964 


Music 


1965 


East Team 


1965 


Music 


1966 


Psychological Consultant 


1966 


Remedial Reading 


1965 


Speech Therapist 


1964 


Music 


1964 


Middle Team 


1965 


Middle Team - Art 


1965 


South Team 


1965 


Middle Team 


1963 


Middle Team 


1964 


Physical Education 


1965 



* Part-time teachers 



STAFF MEMBERS - TERMINATED 1966 



Rosemary Ambruso 
Barbara Benefield 
Barbara Bra eke tt 
Anne Marie Dogan 
Joseph Fallo 
Linda Frinsko 
Betty Gilmer 
Judith Grady 
Janna Hadley 
Jacqueline Hillman 



Team 1 


1965 


Team G 


1965 


Team 


1964 


French 


1965 


Science Coordinator 


1964 


Team 2 


1965 


Science 


1965 


Team 3 


1963 


Team V 


1965 


Kindergarten 


1965 



191 



Name 


Position 




Appointed 


Pamela T. Humphreys 


French 




1963 


Carol Johnston 


Team 5 




1965 


Wanda Johnson 


French 




1965 


Pamella McLean 


Science 




1965 


Nancy Mead 


Team 1 




1964 


Katherine Mitchell 


Team N 




1964 


Carolyn Plsek 


Team 1 




1965 


Lota Post 


Kindergarten 




1965 


David Rivers 


Team N 




1964 


Naomi Rosenberg 


Team 2 




1965 


Loretta Silvestri 


Team Y 




1964 


*Augusta Sisk 


Director of Testing 


1946 


Mary Ann Smith 


English, Social 


Studies 


1965 


Nancy Soscia 


Art 




1963 


Susan Vickery 


Team 1 




1965 


Gay West 


Team 4 




1965 



* Retired 



192 



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193 



LINCOLN- SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

James M. Jagger, Chairman 

Virginia K. Kirshner, Vice- Chairman 

Robert W. Bierig 

Ellen DeN. Cannon 

Richard F. Clippinger 

Henry M. Morgan 



1966 marked the tenth anniversary of the Regional 
High School. It also marked a major change in the 
administration of the school. The study of school ad- 
ministration referred to in last year's report was com- 
pleted in 1966. As a result of this study, the School 
Committee voted, effective July 1, that the high school 
administration would consist of a Superintendent-Prin- 
cipal, Assistant Principal and a Guidance Director. 

Mr. Willard A. Ruliffson was appointed Superinten- 
dent-Principal in July, Mr. Robert E. Millett, who had 
been a teacher in the high school since September 1960, 
was appointed Assistant Principal, and Mr. Harold Rosen 
was appointed Director of Guidance in July to fill the 
vacancy resulting from the death of Mr. Paul Vernon in 
1965. 

The year saw the loss of three major leaders of 
the school over the past decade. Mr. C. Newton Heath, 
who had been Superintendent since .1957, announced his 
retirement in the early spring, and Dr. Leslie M. Tour- 
ville, who had been Principal since 1956, resigned in 
July to accept another position. Also, in July, Dr. 
Howard W. Emmons, who was first elected to the School 
Committee in 1955, resigned to take his sabbatical year, 
The towns, the high school alumni and the School Com- 
mittee are indebted to Mr. Heath, Dr. Tourville, and 
Dr. Emmons for their leadership and the sound education- 
al philosophy with which they guided the high school 
through its first decade. 

The school opened in the fall with approximately 
1180 students - an increase of 130 over the previous 
year. A sufficient number of new classrooms were 
available in the new facilities of the third building 
phase to accommodate this increased enrollment even 



194 



though the construction contract as a whole was behind 
schedule. The construction contract called for com- 
pletion by the opening of school in September. By 
Thanksgiving we had moved into the new science wing, 
administration area, gymnasium and industrial arts 
addition. The library and auditorium will be com- 
pleted in the spring of 1967. Because the completion 
date called for in the contract was not met, the pen- 
alty clause in the contract was invoked. The admin- 
istration, faculty and -students are adapting well to 
the situation even though all are suffering some in- 
convenience. 

After the annual town meetings, a committee was 
appointed consisting of the Chairmen of the Boards of 
Selectmen, the Chairmen of the Finance Committees and 
a member-at-large from each town to review the origin- 
al 1954 agreement which established the regional school 
district. This committee recommended an amendment to 
the agreement which apportioned the state construction 
aid to the member towns on the basis of each year's 
current enrollment. This amendment was adopted by 
Lincoln at a Special Town Meeting in November and will 
be in the warrant for the 1967 Sudbury Annual Town 
Meeting. Approval of both towns is required for adop- 
tion of the amendment. 

The Committee was gratified by the large attend- 
ance at the annual budget hearings in each town in Nov- 
ember. It is hoped that this demonstration of citizen 
interest in the educational and fiscal affairs of the 
high school will continue. 

The change in administration, the delay in the 
completion of the third building phase and the contin- 
uing problems of rapid growth made 1966 a difficult 
year in many ways. The loyalty, devotion and high 
professional competence of the administration and facul- 
ty promise a continuation of an excellent school. 



195 



THE LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Treasurer's Report/ December 31 / 1966 
Total cash balance, January 1, 1966 $ 591,232.43 



District Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1966 

Receipts : 

Lincoln Assessment 
Sudbury Assessment 
State reimbursement - 

Building construction 

Planning money 

Transportation 
Premium on loan 
* Miscellaneous income 
Sale of bonds 
U. S. Treasury bills 
Certificates of deposit - 

First National Bank of Boston 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield 



Disbursements : 
Operating budget 
Debt Service - interest 

- principal 
U. S. Treasury bills 
Certificates of deposit - 

First National Bank of Boston 
Building construction 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield 

Cash balance, December 31, 1966 

* Miscellaneous Income 



$ 551,707.27 



Books $ 

Employer compensation - 
Mass. withholding tax 
Industrial arts - metal 
- wood 
(1) Interest on bond 
proceeds 
Interest on bonds 
Interest on State 

reimbursement funds 
Miscellaneous 
Comm. of Mass. - 

Chapter 671 
Telephone commission 



1, 



36, 



1/ 



530.01 

81.15 
335.61 
048.86 

558.78 
377.16 

792.50 
51.40 

408.00 
208.87 



I 298,925.77 
789,521.21 

143,448.45 

128,796.29 

66,571.00 

194.00 

46,564.59 

485,000.00 

1,103,073.94 

2,338,000.00 

9,125.41 5,409,220.66 
$5,960,927.93 



; 947,706.05 
104,706.00 
228,000.00 
854,028.94 

1,538,000.00 
1,870,136.10 

9,123.73 5,551,700.82 



$ 409,227.11 



196 



Towels $ 3,389.50 

Tuition 1,400.90 

Use of building 285.50 

Vending machines 96. 35 

$46,564.59 

(1) Transferred to building account 



Cafeteria Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1966 $ 5,396.09 

Receipts $ 47,790.63 

Disbursements 47,681.59 

Cash balance, December 31, 1966 5, 505.13 

Athletic Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1966 $ 20.25 

Receipts $ 1,292.50 
Disbursements 1,312.75 

Cash balance, December 31, 1966 Nil 

Federal Reimbursement Fund, P. L. 864 

Cash balance, January 1, 1966 $ 24,132.89 

Receipts 810.04 
Disbursements 

Cash balance, December 31, 1966 24,942.93 

Federal Reimbursement Fund, P. L. 874 

Cash balance, January 1, 1966 $ 9,049.15 

Receipts $ 26,541.00 

Disbursements 30,944.60 

Cash balance, December 31, 1966 4, 645.55 

Adult Education Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1966 $ 712.47 

Receipts $ 3,200.00 

Disbursements 3,017.02 

Cash balance, December 31, 1966 895.45 

Music Scholarship Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1966 $ 214.31 

Receipts $ 13.67 
Disbursements 

Cash balance, December 31, 1966 227.98 



197 



Howard W. Emmons Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1966 $ 

Receipts $ 134.31 
Disbursements 

Cash balance, December 31, 1966 134.31 

Total cash balance, December 31, 1966 $445, 578.46 



George B. Flint, Treasurer 



198 



BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1966 

ASSETS 

Cash 

First National Bank of Boston $ 445,350.48 
Waltham Savings Bank 227.98 

Certificates of Deposit - 
First National Bank of Boston 200,000.00 

Total Assets $ 645,578.46 

LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Appropriation balances : 
No n- Revenue 

Building construction #2 $ 1,891.13 

Building construction #3 421,322.67 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Construction costs 63,265.95 

Transportation' 66,571.00 

Federal Reimbursement P. L. 864 24,942.93 

Federal Reimbursement P. L. 874 4,645.55 

Surplus Revenue 56,174.68 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 1.68 
Revolving Funds 

Cafeteria 5,505.13 

Athletic 

Adult Education 895.45 

Music Scholarship 227.98 

Howard W. Emmons Fund 134. 31 

Total Liabilities and Reserves 



Outstanding Debt 

2.2% School Bonds payable $5,000 May 1, 1967-75, 

inclusive ' $ 45,000.00 

2.4% School Bonds payable $20,000 Nov. 1, 1967-74, 

inclusive 160,000.00 

2.4% School Bonds payable $50,000 Nov. 1, 1967-75, 

inclusive 450,000.00 

3.7% School Bonds payable $50,000 May 1, 1967-80, 

inclusive 700,000.00 

3.1% School Bonds payable $100,000 Feb. 1, 1967-85, 

inclusive 1,900,000.00 

4.0% School Bonds payable $25,000 Aug. 1, 1967-83,) 
inclusive ) 

$20,000 Aug. 1, 1984-86,) 
inclusive ) 485,000.00 

$3,740,000.00 



199 



LINCOLN- SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
SUPERI NTENDENT- PRI NCI PAL 
Willard A. Ruliffson 



As Lincoln- Sudbury Regional begins its second dec- 
ade, there is continued dedication to the sound educa- 
tional policies of the first ten years as well as the 
change and growth of an educational program which is 
moving ahead to meet the demands of increased popula- 
tion and of the individual needs and differences of 
students. This, my first report as Superintendent- 
Principal, is both a review of the first months of the 
1966-67 school year and also an outline of those pro- 
gram changes which are currently underway or are in 
planning stages. 

New Staff 

The Lincoln-Sudbury enrollment for grades 9-12 
totaled 1182 as school started this past September. 
The professional staff, both administrative and teach- 
ing personnel, now includes eighty persons. We have 
been fortunate to have a number of outstanding new fac- 
ulty members join us this year. Included in this 
group of newcomers are: 

Art Department 

Mrs. Dorothy D. Bruce 

English Department 

Mr. David, B. Bronson 
Mr. Thomas B. Hooper 
Mrs. Robert P. Noble, Jr. 
Miss Elizabeth D. Pierson 
Miss Linda Pollard 



History Department 

Mr. Steven R. Goldberg 
Miss Adair E. Linn 
Mr. Richard Murphy 



200 



Language Department 

Miss Cecile T. Brault - French 
Miss Juliette Bundgus - French 
Miss Elise A. Klein - French 
Mr. James L. DeSimone - German 
Mrs. Richard A. Cabell - Spanish 

Mathematics Department 

Mrs. J. Keith Crisco 
Miss Elizabeth Flynn 

Science Department 

Mrs. Robert W. Burton 

Miss Betty Jane Busiek 

Miss Priscilla T. Lockwood 

Mr. James F. Moir 

Mr. Thomas J. O'Brien 

Mrs. Willis M. Pearson, Lab Technician 

Physical Education Department 

Mr. George L. Horton III 
Miss Diane E. Pullo 

Guidance Department 

Mr. Coleman P. Gorham 
Library 

Mrs. Richard G. Williams, Jr. 

There were fourteen staff members who did not re- 
turn after the close of the 1965-66 school year: four 
left for professional improvement/ three left because 
of family responsibility, one deceased, three left for 
further study, and three were not reappointed. 

Administration 

There are both new faces and new positions in the 
school administration this year. The newly created 
position of Superintendent-Principal combines the duties 



201 



of the chief school officer with those of a building ad- 
ministrator. The Superintendent-Principal is directly- 
responsible to the Regional School Committee and res- 
ponsible for the overall educational program and opera- 
tion of the school. In addition, the role of the 
Assistant Principal has been currently redefined so that 
his responsibilities involve direct control of day-to- 
day student matters, general supervision of building 
utilization, and other duties as assigned by the Super- 
intendent-Principal. Mr. Robert E. Millett, who served 
in a temporary capacity as an assistant last year, was 
appointed to the position of Assistant Principal in 
July. A new Guidance Director , Mr. Harold Rosen, also 
joined our staff over the summer. This position is the 
third key area of administrative responsibility in that 
the Director works closely with the Superintendent-Prin- 
cipal and the Assistant Principal, as well as with the 
entire teaching staff, in the process of planning and 
evaluating the total educational program. 

Broad, long range planning is the prime concern and 
task of the Administrative Council . This group, com- 
posed of the Superintendent-Principal, Assistant Princi- 
pal, Guidance Director, Business Manager and nine de- 
partment chairmen, meets on a weekly basis to share in 
reviewing the administrative and program planning of its 
subcommittees. The nine department chairmen included 
in the Administrative Council are Mr. Bramwell Arnold, 
Mr. Lewis Baldwin, Miss Ruth Buxton, Mrs. Irene Dhosi, 
Mr. Frank Heys, Mr. Edward Leary, interdepartmental 
chairman, Mr. Terry Miskell, Mr. Paul Mitchell and Mr. 
Norman Swicker. 

School Building Additions 

The new additions, originally scheduled for comple- 
tion this September (1966) were not ready, thus result- 
ing in the need to teach some classes in areas not spec- 
ifically designed for that subject. Cooperation on 
the part of the administration, teachers, students, as 
well as parents, resulted in "school as usual" in spite 
of the inconveniences. 

The humanities wing opened in September with some 
history, English and science classes housed there. Also 
in September the new administrative office area was oc- 
cupied with space for the high school secretarial staff, 



202 



the Business Manager and the Assistant Principal. New 
office facilities for the Superintendent-Principal 
were provided by renovating space in the original high 
school building. At the opening of school, the Super- 
intendent-Principal moved into the new offices, vacating 
the offices located in the white frame house at the cor- 
ner of Concord and Lincoln Roads. The Liberty Council, 
a cooperative educational planning organization com- 
posed of several school districts in this area, will be 
housed in the old administrative offices beginning in 
January 1967. Toward the end of November, the science 
area was ready for occupancy and proved to have been 
"well worth waiting for", with its modern, well designed 
equipment and facilities. Following the move into this 
area, it was possible to complete the occupancy of the 
humanities wing as designed for English and history 
classes. The gymnastic gymnasium opened in December 
with its extensive equipment for individual and team 
gymnastic work, as well as a separate wrestling room. 
Equipment for the new library is to be installed in Jan- 
uary, making that facility ready for use by the begin- 
ning of the second semester. Finally, the new audito- 
rium, with a professionally designed theatrical stage 
and seating for 900, is progressing well and should be 
completed by early spring. 

Program Changes 

In November the school administration announced the 
start of a new educational program to meet the individ- 
ual needs of a number of students now experiencing 
marked difficulty in such academic areas as English and 
history. A study was undertaken by an action committee 
for study of programs to serve less motivated students. 
Members of this continuing committee are Mrs. Lydia Mail- 
hot, Mr. Joseph Pacenka and Mr. Coleman Gorham. They 
indicated that the fundamental problem was a verbal one. 
The amount and difficulty of reading material in basic 
subjects presents a major obstacle to success for some 
students. 

Mrs. Patricia Punchard, English teacher, was se- 
lected for this program. Initially, Mrs. Punchard will 
be working with about twelve (12) students in the junior 
class and will offer a variety of classroom experiences 
based on a practical approach to the improvement of com- 
munication skills. An addition is planned for the sec- 



203 



ond semester to employ a remedial reading specialist 
provided through aid from a Federal Grant. 

This is the first step in a program which will be 
expanded in the coming months. By the second semester 
of this school year, a small number of Regional students 
will have an opportunity to participate in a work-exper- 
ience program which will enable them to have on-the-job 
training in nearby commercial or industrial firms. Sev- 
eral trips have been planned by the Administration and 
staff to visit other school systems which have started 
or are planning programs which emphasize the develop- 
ment of practical vocational skills. 

Members of the Industrial Arts Department have pre- 
pared a curriculum proposal for the offering of semi- 
vocational course work to some of those students who 
could benefit from practical skill training before en- 
tering a vocational or trade school. This program is 
seen as one phase of those curriculum plans proposed to 
meet the needs of less academically oriented students. 
Also this year the industrial arts area was expanded by 
an addition to the metal shop facility. Enrollment in 
all areas (metals, woods, and mechanical drawing) con- 
tinues to increase each year. 

A new course offered this year in the History De- 
partment incorporates three disciplines: music, art and 
philosophy. Several guest lecturers have been invited 
to participate in this program with the result that a 
new insight into European History has resulted for the 
students involved. At this time the history depart- 
ment is preparing two new courses for next year, one 
having to do with the process of group dynamics and 
another course which will highlight the life and times 
of five men and five women from various periods of his- 
tory. 

The Math Department continues to offer an attraction 
to a high percentage of the student body in that during 
any given semester ninety to ninety-five per cent of all 
students are enrolled in a math course. This year an 
experiment with team teaching is underway which involves 
three sections of level three math in the sophomore year, 
This is a geometry course with considerable emphasis on 
audiovisual techniques and with provision for large and 



204 



small group instruction as the three teachers cooperate 
in the team. Members of the math department are con- 
tinuing to work cooperatively as members of a Math Cur- 
riculum Study Committee including teachers from the 
three districts, Lincoln, Sudbury, and the Regional High 
School. They have participated in the Committees' 
writing of a course of study for use in the districts. 

Art is now housed in a different location, having 
moved from the old science wing to the area which for- 
merly housed business education classrooms. There is 
an additional faculty member in the art area this year 
on a part time basis. The expanded program serves a 
growing number of students who elect art as a regular 
part of their course work. 

Music continues to serve a large number of students 
in choral and instrumental areas as well as offering 
music theory courses for advanced students. This year 
an orchestra has been initiated and is rehearsing on a 
regular basis. The band continues to grow and now in- 
cludes fifty-five members. Members of the music staff 
joined with music teachers from both Lincoln and Sud- 
bury this year in a joint effort to review, evaluate, 
and plan for changes in the music programs of the three 
districts. As a part of this cooperative undertaking 
the districts invited a music consultant to spend a week 
working with all music teachers and observing various 
facets of the music program. The recommendations of 
this consultant are being studied by the music staff 
members of all three districts. 

More classroom space has been allotted to Home Econ- 
omics this year and has resulted in more flexibility for 
the home economics program. A new clothing course for 
non-majors has been instituted and has been most success- 
ful in providing more opportunities for interested girls 
to work on clothing throughout the course of a full year. 

In the area of Foreign Languages the second language 
lab was built and completed by the opening of school in 
September. This lab includes cartridge type recorders 
in thirty units. Both of the language labs are now be- 
ing used on a regularly scheduled basis making it possi- 
ble for all language classes to use the labs at least 
twice each week. The language areas now being offered 



205 



include French, Spanish, German and Latin. Four years 
of each language are provided. 

The Physical Education and Athletics Department has 
expanded its operation this year by the opening of a new 
gymnastic gymnasium. This facility was part of the new 
construction and makes possible extensive gymnastic and 
body building experiences for young people. Also this 
year for the first time Girls' Lacrosse and Boys' Junior 
Varsity Baseball will be added to the athletic program. 
On December 15th the physical education department sub- 
mitted its recommendations for the coming year and long 
range future plans. On the basis of this study and the 
recommendations of the administration, the School Com- 
mittee voted to include for next year (1967-68) the fol- 
lowing physical education and athletic programs: Girls' 
Badminton, Girls' Track and Field, Football, Skiing, Ten- 
nis, Fencing, Archery. The need for a swimming facility 
as a basic facet of a complete physical education pro- 
gram was also recognized. 

Members of the English Department in cooperation 
with the History Department have prepared a new approach 
to a senior English seminar. This year a panel of four 
teachers presented a series of lectures dealing with the 
Middle Ages and the Elizabethan Period. This approach 
incorporated the use of original sources and provided a 
look at various historical and literary materials from 
the periods studied. Another project undertaken by the 
English department is a joint project with Simmons Col- 
lege. This is a partnership program in which members 
of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School staff and 
members of the Simmons College staff will cooperate in 
establishing a student teaching center. Simmons has 
invited the Regional English faculty to take part in de- 
signing and teaching courses for student teachers. The 
school administration representing the School Committee 
has applied for a Federal Grant to underwrite this co- 
operative project between Simmons College and Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High School. 

The Business Department in its new location in the 
old science wing has been provided with expanded class- 
room space. The increasing number of students electing 
typing as a course has resulted in an expanded program 
both for business oriented students and for those stu- 



206 



dents desiring to have a typing skill for use in acad- 
emic work. A small scale start has been undertaken 
this year in regard to work experience for students with 
typing and clerical skills but who do not expect to con- 
tinue education beyond high school. Several of these 
students have been given an opportunity as a part of 
their educational program to work in practical office 
situations which will benefit their transition from 
school to the working environment. 

The Science Department has moved into the new sci- 
ence building. More effective science instruction can 
be undertaken with increased benefit to all students in 
science classes. Two especially noticeable features 
of the building are the project areas where students 
can conduct individual research projects on a prolonged 
and undisturbed basis. Also, with the expanded lab 
facilities in each classroom the educational technique 
of having students participate in experimental work can 
be further emphasized and advanced. A new lab tech- 
nician, included this year for the first time as a mem- 
ber of the staff, makes it possible to provide for more 
efficient use of lab preparation areas, storage and 
equipment areas, and general control of science equip- 
ment. 

With the opening of the new library facility, ex- 
panded use of library and instructional services of all 
kinds will be possible. One hundred study carrels are 
available for individual study by students and expanded 
audiovisual equipment enhances the educational program 
in classrooms as well as in the library itself. Many 
interested parents continue to assist the school libra- 
rians with the supervision and general operation of the 
library program. On a regularly scheduled basis these 
volunteers work at the checkout desk, assist in process- 
ing books, and perform other necessary clerical and 
accounting duties. 

The report of the Guidance Department, included on 
the following pages, indicates that 72.2% of the 1966 
Senior class enrolled in educational programs beyond 
high school. Of those students attending four year 
colleges (110) there were 65 who enrolled in colleges 
in the State of Massachusetts, among others 25 students 
enrolled in the University of Massachusetts, 8 at North- 



207 



eastern, 6 at Boston University, 5 at Harvard University, 
and 4 at Clark University. Under the direction of the 
guidance department, the school once again sponsored the 
annual home-coming for former graduates at which time 
105 students from the 1966 graduating class returned for 
some discussion sessions and an evening dinner at Lin- 
coln-Sudbury Regional High School. The guidance de- 
partment this year includes four full time counselors 
and five teacher counselors. As the school increases 
in size and with the growing variety of course offerings 
which are made available to meet the individual needs of 
all students, the role of the counselor assumes even 
greater importance. Emphasis has been placed on an in- 
creased number of counselor initiated conference ses- 
sions as well as providing opportunities for flexible 
scheduling in order to permit students the greatest lat- 
itude possible in finding a program which is appropriate 
for their skills, interests, and goals. 



208 



SUMMARY POST- SECONDARY EDUCATION OF THE CLASS OF 1966 



Schools 
Four-Year Degree Granting Colleges 
Junior Colleges 
Business/Secretarial Schools 
Preparatory/Post Graduate Schools 
Nursing Schools (Diploma) 
Specialized/Technical Schools 



Number 


Percent 


110 


47.6 


25 


10.8 


11 


4.8 


12 


5.2 


1 


0.4 


8 


3.4 



167 



72.2 



SUMMARY OF OCCUPATIONS OF THE CLASS OF 1966 



Employed 


Number 


Percent 


In Offices 


13 


5.6 


In Retail Trade 


6 


2.6 


In Construction and Maintenance 


2 


0.9 


In Industry 


19 


8.2 


At Home 


2 


0.9 


Armed Forces 


11 


4.8 


Married 


6 


2.6 


Exchange Students Returned to Native Land 


3 


1.3 


Moved 


2 


0.9 



64 



27.8 



209 



POST- SECONDARY SCHOOL PLACEMENT — CLASS OF 1966 

Admitted to Four- Year Degree Granting Institutions 

110 Students Placed in 57 Colleges 

NEW ENGLAND 

Connecticut 

Central Connecticut State College 1 

Maine 

Bates College 1 

Colby College 2 

University of Maine 4 

Massachusetts 

Babson Institute 1 

Boston College 1 

Boston University 6 

Clark University 4 

Harvard University 5 

Jackson College 1 

Lowell Technical Institute 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 

Massachusetts College of Art 3 

Mount Holyoke 1 

Northeastern University 8 

State College at Boston 1 

State College at Framingham 2 

State College at Salem 1 

State College at Westfield 1 

Tufts University 1 

University of Massachusetts 25 

Wellesley College 1 

Williams College 1 

Rhode Island 

Rhode Island School of Design 1 

University of Rhode Island 1 

Vermont 

Middlebury College 1 

University of Vermont 2 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC 

Maryland 

Goucher 2 

Notre Dame College 1 

United States Naval Academy 1 

New Jersey 

Drew University 1 



210 



New York 

Bard College 2 

Friends ' World Institute 1 

Hamilton College 1 

New York University 1 

Sarah Lawrence College 1 

Syracuse University 1 

Vassar College 1 

Pennsylvania 

Lafayette College 1 

Lehigh University 1 

Swarthmore College 1 

Villanova University 1 

MID- WEST 

Illinois 

Rockford College 1 

University of Chicago 2 

Michigan 

Kalamazoo College 1 

Ohio 

Western College for Women 1 

Wisconsin 

Beloit College 1 

SOUTH 

Georgia 

Emory University 1 

Florida 

Florida State University 1 

University of Miami 1 

North Carolina 

Pembroke State College 1 

WEST 

Colorado 

Colorado Women's College 1 

Hawaii 

University of Hawaii 1 

Oklahoma 

University of Oklahoma 1 

South Dakota 

Yankton College 1 

Utah 

Brigham Young University 1 

211 



Admitted to Junior Colleges 

Connecticut 

Mitchell College 1 

Massachusetts 

Bay Path Junior College 1 

Cape Cod Community College 1 

Chamberlayne Junior College 1 

Greenfield Community College 2 

Lasell Junior College 1 

Massachusetts Bay Community College 4 

Quinsigamond Community College 1 

Worcester Junior College 5 

New Hampshire 

Colby Junior College 3 

New York 

Briarcliff College 3 

Corning Community College 1 

Vermont 



Vermont College 



Admitted to Business/Secretarial Schools 

Bay State Academy 1 

Bentley School of Accounting & Finance 1 

Bryant & Stratton 1 

Burdett College 1 

Cambridge School of Business 1 

Chamberlain School of Retailing 1 

Chandler School for Women 1 

Midwest Institute (Missouri) 1 

Robie Secretarial School 1 

Suburban Business School 2 



Admitted to Nursing School 

Nursing School (Non-Degree) 

Boston City Hospital School of Nursing 



Admitted to Specialized and Technical Schools 

Automatic Training School (IBM) 1 

Hartford Airline Personnel School (Conn.) 1 

Henry Simon School of Floral Design 1 

North Shore Babies' & Children's Hospital (L.P.N.) 1 

Vermont Technical School 1 

Wentworth Institute 3 



212 



GRADUATES 



CLASS OF 1966 



Linda G. Abate 
Gail Ellen Aiken 
Vincent Alfonso 
Susan Louise Allen 
Mical C. Allopenna 
Sue Carol Anderson 
Charles Parker Arnold 
Margaret Bouton Barnaby 
Francine E. Battista 
Martha Louise Bautze 
Dorothy Louise Bent 
Elliott G. Bespolka, Jr. 
Judy the Ann Bis son 
Arthur Gordon Blake 
Mark J. Blanchard 
Anne Louise Bobroff 
Frank Robert Bockoven 
Leslie Bowry 
Maureen Teresa Boyd 
Dorothy Ruth Buerger 
Ellen Louise Buffington 
Donna Elizabeth Burke 
Ian Hector Butler 
Bonnie Lu Campbell 
Peter Joseph Campobasso 
John Clifford Cantlin 
Richard Carroll 
Lorraine Marie Caso 
Carole Lynn Cathcart 
Michael John Chandonait 
Yolanda Chen 
Judith Child 
Janet Alice Chisholm 
Nevis E. Cook, Jr. 
David Lawrence Corrigan 
Beverly Jean Coughlin 
John Howard Cox 
Linda Ruth Cox 
Janet Louise Crowe 
Michael John Curran 
Anne Cutler 
Thomas William Da vies 
Patricia Burton Davis 
Eric Kimball Deane 



Rosemary Claire Debye 
Geraldine Ann DeCilio 
Nancy Rae DeRidder 
Robyn Lee Demon 
Sally Duryea Devereux 
Priscilla Devoll 
Joanne Dickey 
Jacqueline Downing 
Richard A. Doyon 
Francis J. Dugan, Jr. 
Diane Aleta Dunsford 
Donna Speed Dustin 
Robert Emmet Early 
Carlton Warren El lms III 
Keith Howard Emmons 
Albert Charles England III 
Judith Helen Enos 
Andrea Michele Ericson 
Patricia Dale Ericson 
Bruce Llewellen Ey 
Robert Waino Fagerlund 
Judith Christine Fawcett 
Carolyn Leland Filbin 
David Bruce Fillmore 
Sharon Louise FitzPatrick 
Stuart James Fletcher 
Richard Joseph Floridia 
Thomas James Floyd 
Mary Elizabeth Fluhr 
Sharon Elizabeth Forsyth 
Raymond Foster 
David P. Frost 
John Leslie Fultz 
Barbara Ann Gajewski 
Robert W. Galligan, Jr. 
David R. Gardner 
Richard D. Garland 
Edith Garrison 
Frank Wright Garrison II 
Joseph Domenic Gentile 
David P. Gibbs 
Diane H. Gonyer 
Donna Jean Gonyer 
Juanita Louise Gonzalez 



213 



William Dwight Goodwin 
Linda Svea Goranson 
Gregory Warren Graham 
Kathryn Janine Grason 
Richard Harris Greenblatt 
Mary Neupert Greene 
Heidi Lizbeth Grey 
Robert Brian Hagmann 
Charles Richard Hagopian 
Dorothy Ann Hall 
William Wallace Hamilton 
Henry Arthur Haroian 
Warren Walter Harpster 
Thomas Andrew Harris, Jr. 
Mary Kathleen Hennessy 
Lucy Rand Herman 
Elizabeth Cecelia Hill 
Luanne Marie Hinds 
Mark L. Hinkle III 
Frances Hoagland 
David Bruce Horton 
Abigail Sargent Hough 
*Mary Ann Ho ugh ten 
Raymond Charles Houghton 
Steven Lawrence Huneck 
Warren H. Ide, Jr. 
Lee Kendall Jensen 
Susan Hills Jewett 
Peter Clarke Johnson 
David Berm Jones 
Donald Curtis Jordan II 
Mark Joyce 

John Michael Kane, Jr. 
Roberta Eileen Kelley 
Shawn Charles Kelley 
Richard Mann Kelly 
Dolores Eliza Kerwin 
James Leonard King, Jr. 
Wayne Michael King 
Robert Paul Kirshner 
Beverly Jeane Klee 
Philip Kropp 

Christopher Gale Langton 
Gregory Duane Lapsley 
Joseph A. Lebruto, Jr. 
Lauren Marie Leone 
Leslie Rose Leone 
Robert G. Lind, Jr. 



Karen Jean Linstrom 

Margaret A. Lombardi 

Patricia Ann Long 

William Worth L6omis 

Linda Mae Mackie 

Wayne Anthony Maiuri 

Elizabeth Stuart Mann 

John Manzelli 

Jerry Ellsworth Marsh 

Patricia Ann Martin 

Barbara Lynn Martini 

Dominic Michael Mastrototaro 

Richard George Maurer 

Donna R. McCarthy 

Karen Lynn Ann McCarthy 

Eliza McClennen 

Joseph R. McCullough 

William Joseph McCune 

Vernon Craig McCurrach 

Kathleen Rose McQuade 

William Hudson McSheehy, Jr. 

Jacklynn Hillary Meehan 

John Edward Mercury 

Gretchen Mertz 

Carolann Elizabeth Messina 

Mar ley Gail Meyer 

Edward Fabian Mlkoski, Jr. 

Laura Militzer 

Gary Miranda 

Susan Alice Morrison 

Christine Morse 

Timothy William Murphy 

Victoria Neumeier 

Daniel Joseph O'Connor III 

David Pickering Palmer 

James Lawrence Park 

Michael Stanley Phippard 

Kennard P. Rawson 

John L. Reid 

William J. Renwick 

Susan Elizabeth Rice 

Linda Jean Roberts 

Judith Craig Rogers 

Joan Cynthia Russell 

Patricia Rae Rutherford 

Nancy Lee Ryther 

Elaine Marie-Anne Savignano 

Elaine Schaffner 



214 



Susan Lynn Schjelderup 
Stanford Warren Scott 
Susanne Bishop Sharpe 
Rose Karen Sherry- 
Linda Shewan 
Wayne M. Shurling 
Henry Lloyd Shuster, Jr. 
Jonathan Lieb Siegle 
Luanne Silva 
Lois Eunice Simmermon 
*Mark S. Simoneau 
William Lee Skog 
Elliot S. Smith 
Marion Elizabeth Spaan 
Wayne Albert Spiller 
Kenneth Paul Stacey 
Mitchell Prescott Steege 
Linda Stone 
Robert W. Streeter 
Elisabeth Harding Sturgis 
Laurel Edith Taffe 
Jane Theresa Thompson 
Deborah Lee Thurlow 
Peter Stiles Tighe 
Peter Tlumacki 
Peter Wayne To rode 
Jo-Ann Trees 
Linda Victoria Troisi 
Sally Deborah Truesdale 
Roberta Grace Turk 
Gregory Bradford Turner 
Walter L. Van Wart, Jr. 
Elizabeth Ann Walba 
Pamela Carol Warner 
Carol Anne Way 
John Godwin Way 
Patricia Ann Welch 
Janet Frances Whalen 
Richard A. Wilfert 
Kenneth Howard Williams 
Clifford Charles Wilson 
Hobart Oakes Winchell 
Catherine Ava Wood 
Ruth Kathleen Wright 
Elinor Beth Yalen 
Linda Bemadette Zinko 

* In absentia 



215 



SUPERINTENDENT ' S REPORT 
Regional District Operating Expenses 

1966 



1967 
Budget 



Funds Available 
Appropriation, Salaries & Expense $980,467.00 $1,133,465.00 

Expenditures 



Administration 

School Committee 
Superintendent's Office 

Instruction 
Principals 
Teaching 
Textbooks 
Library service 
Audio Visual 
Guidance services 

Other School Services 
Attendance 
Health services 
Pupil transportation 
Food services 
Student body activities 

Operation and Maintenance of Plant 
Operation of plant 
Maintenance of plant 

Fixed Charges 

Employee's retirement 
Insurance program 

Programs with Other Systems 
Vocational tuition and 
transportation 



$ 2,012.59 $ 
44,998.44 



41,854.15 
546,404.72 
16,931.34 
16,986.27 
4,692.91 
46,798.38 



550.00 

7,437.02 

73,808.22 

4,000.90 

9,664.55 



78,721.36 
28,172.98 



6,640.71 
13,705.12 



4,326.39 



1,650.00 
49,903.00 



32,898.00 
645,615.00 
18,529.00 
31,411.00 
9,402.00 
62, 358.00 



11 



550.00 
342.00 

80,351.00 
4,100.00 

11,173.00 



95,542.00 
45,950.00 



8,115.00 
17,735.00 



6,841.00 



$947,706.05 $1,133,465.00 



Apportionments 



Total Budget 

Less: Available funds in 

District Treasury 

Balance to be apportioned 

Lincoln apportionment 

Sudbury apportionment 



$980,467.00 $1,133,465.00 

74,514.79 169,122.32 

$905,952.21 $ 964,342.68 

$251,418.35 $ 271,988.55 

$654,533.86 $ 692,354.13 



216 



LINCOLN- SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

School Organization and Staff 
January 1, 1967 



School Committee 

James M. Jagger, Chairman 

Virginia K. Kirshner, Vice Chairman 

Robert W. Bierig 

Ellen DeN. Cannon 

Richard F. Clippinger 

Henry M. Morgan 



Term expires 1968 
Term expires 1969 
Term expires 1968 
Term expires 1969 
Term expires 1967 
Term expires 1967 



Superintendent-Principal 



Willard A. Ruliffson 



Office ; 

390 Lincoln Road 

Sudbury 



443-9961 
259-9527 



Business Manager and Secretary to School Committee 
Lily T. Spooner 443-9961 

District Treasurer 



George B. Flint 



259-8611 



Professional Personnel 



Robert E. Millett 
Harold Rosen 
Kathleen M. Abbott 
Betty Jane Adrian 
Bramwell B. Arnold 
Barbara M. Athy 
Ouida L. Bailey 
Lewis K. Baldwin 
Katherine D. Barton 
Francis E. Bellizia 
John B. Bowdoin 
Barbara S. Brannen 
Cecile T. Brault 
David B. Bronson 
Dorothy Bruce 
Juliette A. Bundgus 



Appointed 




1966 


Assistant Principal 


1966 


Guidance Director 


1965 


Business 


1961 


Counselor 


1956 


Physics 


1964 


Physical Education 


1964 


On Leave of Absence 


1961 


Physical Education 


1956 


Home Economics 


1965 


English and Reading 


1958 


History 


1964 


Home Economics 


1966 


French 


1966 


English 


1966 


Art 


1966 


French 



217 



Eleanor M. Burgess 
Evelyn R. Burton 
Betty Jane Busiek 
Ruth M. Buxton 
H. Hayden Cabell 
Miriam S. Coombs 
Jane S. Crisco 
James L. DeSimone 
-Irene R. Dhosi 
Vicki A. Edelmann 
William J. Edmonds 
Marion F. Edwards 
Marjorie J. Flanagan 
Elizabeth M. Flynn 
William B. Galvin 
Mark G. Gulesian 
Steven R. Goldberg 
Coleman Gorham 
Judye G. Hartman 
Frank Heys, Jr. 
George L. Ho r ton 
Thomas B. Hooper 
Richard J. Johnson 
Elise A. Klein 
Joseph D. Krol 
Edward F. Leary 
Philip G. Lewis 
Adair E. Linn 
Priscilla T. Lockwood 
John S. MacKenzie 
Harry J. Madru 
Lydia A. Mailhot 
Richard E. Markham 
Alexander G. Marshall, 
Raymond S. Martin 
Terry F. Miskell 
Paul B. Mitchell 
James F. Moir 
Richard G. Murphy 
Frances H. Ness 
Karen Jo Noble 
Thomas J. O'Brien 
Joseph A. Pacenka 
Albert S. Palmer 
Martha R. Pappas 
Carl G. Perkins 
Elizabeth D. Pierson 



Appointed 




1963 


Mathematics 


1966 


Biology 


1966 


Biology and Chemistry 


1956 


Latin 


1966 


French and Spanish 


1956 


English 


1966 


Mathematics 


1966 


German and Spanish 


1956 


Business 


1963 


Physical Education 


1965 


Instrumental Music 


1956 


Biology 


1962 


Mathematics 


1966 


Mathematics 


1959 


Mathematics 


1961 


On Leave of Absence 


1966 


History 


1966 


Guidance Counselor 


1965 


Mathematics 


1957 


English 


1966 


Physical Education 


1967 


English 


1958 


Business 


1966 


French 


1961 


German 


1960 


Art 


1962 


Mathematics 


1966 


History 


1966 


Earth Science 


1961 


Physical Education 


1965 


Art 


1965 


English 


1964 


History 


Jr. 1956 


On Leave of Absence 


1960 


Chemistry 


1965 


Mathematics 


1957 


History 


1966 


Earth Science 


1966 


History 


1966 


Biology 


1966 


English and Speech 


1966 


Biology 


1965 


Industrial Arts 


1964 


Mathematics 


1961 


English 


1960 


Reading 


1966 


English 



218 



Linda J. Pollard 
Laura S. Pollock 
Jerry Poznak 
Thomas J. Puchalsky 
Dianne E. Pullo 
H. Patricia Punchard 
Harriet J. Rogers 
Bradford H. Sargent 
Frederic A. Scott 
Sherman P. Spaulding 
Norman R. Swicker 
Susan D. Trutt 
Paul J. Walsh 
Sherry G. Wang 
Robert G. Wentworth 
Susan Wheatley 
Judy Williams 
Henry C. Zabierek 



Appointed 




1966 


English 


1957 


Guidance Counselor 


1965 


English 


1964 


English and Latin 


1966 


Physical Education 


1964 


English 


1965 


English, Speech, Drama 


1962 


History 


1961 


Physics and Chemistry 


1963 


Mathematics 


1961 


Industrial Arts 


1966 


Spanish 


1958 


Industrial Arts 


1962 


History 


1960 


Vocal Music 


1963 


Librarian 


1966 


Librarian 


1958 


History 



Jane R. Pearson 



Laboratory Technician 
1966 



Science Department 



Ruth T. Cathcart 
E. Dorothy Borg 
Garcia 0. Kimball 



Secretaries 

To Superintendent-Principal 

To Assistant Principal 

To Guidance Director 



Other Office Personnel 



Hope W. Baldwin 
Doris M. Cook 
Margaret F. Downing 
June G. Finan 



Eugenia N. Garavano 
Virginia A. Maenpaa 
Gertrude I. Patterson 
Lois A. Rawson 



Health Personnel 
Gordon D. Winchell, M. D. 

School Physician 

Lois M. Natoli, R. N. 

Director of P. H.N. A. 



Mary E. O'Connor, R. N, 



259-8618 
443-2545 
443-9961 



School Nurse 



Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 
Alfred C. Derosier 



219 



Custodians and Maintenance 



William L. Long 
Oliver Wainio 
William McNeil 
Frank J. Ahern 
Paul T. Carlman 
John Valentino 



Joseph J. Glebus 
James M. Horan 
Robert L. Ma cGi 11 vr ay- 
Ellsworth W. Oulton 
John A. Thurlow 



Frances B. Long 



Matrons 



Eleanor E. Macdonald 



Cafeteria Personnel 
Josephine Dodge, Manager Martha McDonald 

Anna E. Boyd Eleanor Maria 

Mary C. Grover June Vienot 

Doris Leach Norma Vinciulla 

Rose C. Wright 



Myer Goodwin 



Bus Contractors 

Wellesley Motor Coach Co 



NO- SCHOOL SIGNAL 

In the event of exceptionally severe weather con- 
ditions or when the transportation system is disrupted, 
WBZ, WCOP, WEEI, WHDH, WKOX, WNAC, and WSRO will broadcast 
the no-school announcement between 7:00 and 8:00 A.M. 

Since weather reports are not always reliable, and 
since the School District desires to render maximum educa- 
tional service, the schools will remain open except in very 
severe weather. 



220 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1967-1968 



Orientation for New Staff 

Labor Day 

Workshops and Staff Orientation 

High School Freshmen Orientation 

School Opens - All Classes 

Columbus Day - Holiday 

Thanksgiving Recess 

(one half day on November 22) 

Christmas Vacation 

(one half day on December 21) 

Classes Resume 

Winter Vacation 

Spring Vacation 

Memorial Day - Holiday 

Classes Close 

Closing of School - Staff 



September 1 

September 4 

September 5, 6, 1 

September 7 

September 8 

October 12 

November 2 3, 24 



December 2 2- January 1 
(inclusive) 

January 2 

February 19-23 
(inclusive) 

April 15-19 
(inclusive) 

May 30 

June 19 

June 20-28 
(inclusive) 



221 



Age 

Grade 
9 

10 

11 

12 

PG 



LINCOLN- SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Membership by Age and Grade 
October 1, 1966 



BOYS 



12 13 



14 



15 



16 17 18 19 20 



21 



27 131 15 1 

18 122 9 

25 105 

20 



1 
18 1 
73 10 
4 



174 
150 
149 
108 
4 



Total 



Age 

Grade 
9 

10 

11 

12 

PG 



27 149 162 135 92 15 3 2 585 
GIRLS 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Totals 

32 162 8 1 203 

28 115 8 151 

22 93 3 118 

25 97 1 123 

11 2 



Total 



32 190 145 127 101 2 

Grand Total 

Tuition Pupils Attending Other Schools 
October 1, 1966 



597 
1182 



Arlington Technical & Vocational High School 
Marlborough Vocational High School 
Newton Technical High School 
Waltham Vocational High School 


2 
1 
2 
2 


Total Other Schools 


7 


Distribution of Students between Lincoln and Sudbury 




Lincoln Sudbury Tuition 


Totals 


Regional High 325 856 1 
Vocational 3 4 

328 860 1 


1182 

7 

1189 



222 



THE REGIONAL AGREEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Richard B. Bailey 
Elliott V. Grabill 
Lawrence H. Homan 
Victor A. Lutnicki 
Eben B. Stevens 
John E. Taft 



On the tenth of March, 1966 , the Sudbury Annual 
Town Meeting passed a resolution instructing the Sudbury 
Selectmen to appoint a committee to review the Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High School agreement. The resolution 
as passed is as follows: 

Resolution: Voted 

In consideration of present conditions affecting the 
apportionment of the costs for the operation of the Lin- 
coln-Sudbury School District, the agreement which speci- 
fies the basis for apportionment and representation on 
the School Committee results in certain inequities occa- 
sioned by the changed conditions which have occurred in 
the ensuing years. The Sudbury Finance Committee con- 
siders it advisable at this time that procedures affect- 
ing the apportionment be investigated and that amendments 
to the agreement between the towns be made which will re- 
sult in an equitable apportionment of the operating ex- 
penses, debt services of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
School District, and the representation of the Member 
towns on the committee of such District. 

Be it resolved: 

That the 1966 Town Meeting vote to instruct the 
Selectmen to appoint a committee to investigate the ap- 
portionment of the costs and the representation on the 
District School Committee of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
School District, and to prepare the amendments to such 
agreement required to effect an equitable distribution of 
the costs and representation. 

Be it further resolved: 

That the Selectmen make available services of Town 



223 



Counsel for guidance as considered necessary by the com- 
mittee appointed. 

Be it further resolved: 

That the proposed amendments be subjected to public 
hearings prior to the preparation of the Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional School District budget and assessment for 1967. 

Be it further resolved: 

That such proposed amendments be communicated to 
the Selectmen and Finance Committee of the Town of Lin- 
coln, the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District Com- 
mittee and such other parties concerned with the inclu- 
sion of the amendments in the 1967 annual warrant of the 
Towns of Lincoln and Sudbury. 



As a result of the above resolution, the Sudbury 
Selectmen met with the Lincoln Selectmen on March 31 to 
discuss the formation and membership of the proposed 
committee. Since the Regional High School was a joint 
venture of Lincoln and Sudbury, it was decided that the 
agreement review committee should also have a joint mem- 
bership. Therefore, the members to the new committee 
were to be: the respective chairmen of the Selectmen and 
Finance Committees of both towns and a third member from 
each town (a total of six) . 

The committee had its first official meeting in 
April and has met on a monthly basis since then, and has 
had meetings with the members of the Regional School Com- 
mittee and Town Counsels, as well. 

For those who may be unfamiliar with the Regional 
School concept, a brief description of what it is and 
how it functions may be both helpful and informative. 
The Regional School district is a body-politic and cor- 
porate entity consisting of the two towns of Lincoln and 
Sudbury, but not necessarily restricted to these. The 
Region is operated by a School Committee consisting of 
six elected members, three from each town and having 
terms of three years. The committee derives all its 
authority from the State Legislature and has the same 
powers as are vested in the local school committees, as 
well as the following two different features: 



224 



1. Once the annual budget is adopted (by Decem- 
ber 1 per state law) , the towns have no al- 
ternative or right to change the assessment 
but MUST vote to raise the amount by taxation. 

2. With regard to construction bonds, once the 
Regional District Committee has voted to 
raise an amount for the purpose of a building 
expansion, then the towns have 45 days to 
hold a town meeting to disapprove said vote. 
Should the towns both take more than the 45 
days, then the vote of the Regional Committee 
becomes binding and irrevocable (unless the 
Regional Committee changes its mind and res- 
cinds the first vote) . 

Aside from these legislative provisions, the terms 
and conditions of the relationship between the two towns 
is determined by an agreement that was approved and made 
effective by a vote of each town. 

For a town to withdraw from the Region, the agree- 
ment stipulates that said town must put into an escrow 
fund sufficient monies to cover its portion of the total 
bonded indebtedness. Upon doing this, the withdrawing 
town would have no rights to or use of the Region's fac- 
ilities, and thus would have to raise funds for a new 
high school. 

Should, at some time, the members of the Region wish 
to disband it, then this can be done only in one way. 
A petition must be submitted to the State Legislature, 
since under present state laws, there are no procedures 
for the disbandment of a Regional School System. Such 
a petition could be initiated by a single member of the 
Region or by all members, or by some other appropriate 
party, such as the State Board of Education or by a com- 
mittee of the Legislature. 

Another important point is that any amendment to 
the present agreement must be approved by a majority 
vote (on written ballot) of town meetings of both towns. 

In order to better understand and evaluate the Lin- 
coln-Sudbury Regional agreement, the committee obtained 
copies of twelve other regional agreements. A summary 
of these is shown in the attached schedule. 



225 



One can see that most of these have been amended 
for one reason or another and some more than once. 
While, on the other hand, the Lincoln-Sudbury agreement 
has lasted twelve years without amendments or revisions. 
No attempt was made by the committee to dissect all the 
agreements and determine the best features of each and 
compare the present agreement to this idea. 

It can also be seen that the representation of the 
member towns on the regional committees is evenly split 
between those of equal representation of member towns 
and those of proportional representation. However, one 
significant feature is that most regional committees 
(9/13) have at least one member per town, also a member 
of the local school committee. 

As best can be determined, the Lincoln-Sudbury 
agreement is unique in its handling of the State Aid re- 
ceived by each town for the Region. The proposed amend- 
ment will bring this handling in line with the other 
agreements . 

Topics Reviewed by Committee 

A. Land Use 

The subject of the use of Sudbury land by 
the Regional School and a corresponding com- 
pensation to Sudbury for this use was dis- 
cussed and an agreement was easily reached. 
When the original reasons for the site selec- 
tion were reviewed (i. e. - lower initial 
costs, site within a 2.5 mile radius of joint 
town boundaries, that the population center 
was in Sudbury) , it was felt that the site 
was as good as could be selected even if 
selected today. Also, the question of how 
would one determine a dollar cost to Sudbury 
for the use was considered and was believed 
to be offset by the convenient use made of 
the facilities by Sudbury residents as com- 
pared with the infrequent use made by the 
more distant Lincoln residents. 

It will also be recalled that both towns 
wanted the high school located within their 
respective boundaries. Sudbury held an ad- 



226 



vantage on this point by reason of an exist- 
ing high school in their town whereas Lincoln 
had none. 

Therefore, the committee agreed that no act- 
ion was necessary on this subject and that 
Sudbury would not be compensated. 

B. Representation on the Regional School Com- 
mittee 

As has been previously stated, the Regional 
School Committee consists of six members, 
three from each town. In discussing this 
equal representation, the Review Committee 
re-investigated the characteristics of the 
two towns at inception of the agreement. 

The characteristics of the two towns that 
were compared were: population, rate of new 
construction, state equalized valuation stat- 
istics, school enrollment at all levels, 
state construction aid, and most important, 
the projection of these characteristics into 
the future. All of these pointed to the 
close similarity of the two towns and the 
only equitable solution to the representation 
on the Regional Committee was an equal number 
for each town. 

Additionally, it was the intent of the auth- 
ors of the agreement to charge the Regional 
Committee members with the responsibility for 
the interest of the Regional High School, 
rather than the interest of the individual 
communities. It was thought most advisable 
that the Regional School Committee act as a 
third body separate from the two towns. This, 
it was felt, could be accomplished, if the 
agreement provided for an equal number of 
members from each town, rather than a varying 
number meant to reflect one town's predomin- 
ance over the other. 

To carry the concept of equal representation 
between the two towns one step further, the 



227 



authors provided in the agreement that a 
quorum shall consist of four members, of 
whom two must be from each town. This pro- 
vision has the effect of preventing the pass- 
age of any action by the Regional Committee 
which would favor a member town when one or 
more committee members are absent from one of 
the communities. 

In retrospect, the statistical data and the 
projections into the future have not been 
sustained and it can be argued that today 
the representation is disproportionate to the 
student population, distribution of costs and 
credits for educational aids received from 
State and Federal agencies. If representa- 
tion is to be based upon precisely these fact- 
ors, then a selection formula would have to 
be incorporated into the agreement which would 
provide for flexibility and which would not 
disrupt the elected terms of office of any of 
the members. Such a formula would be quite 
difficult to develop and could be detrimental 
to the educational policies of the Region by 
disrupting the continuity of individual mem- 
bership. It would also detract from the 
Regional Committee's primary responsibility 
to the school as a single educational entity. 

In the deliberations of the review committee, 
the conclusions reached by the authors of the 
agreement appear to have been substantiated by 
the past performance of the Regional School 
Committee. The Review Committee could not 
agree on any other formula for representation. 
The Review Committee did agree that if the Re- 
gional School Committee should cease to funct- 
ion as a single unit then proportional repre- 
sentation will have to be arranged. 

Apportionment of Costs, State Aid and Debt 
Service 

The Review Committee spent most of its time 
trying to resolve what appeared to be an in- 
equity in the per pupil costs between the 
two towns brought about by the apportionment 



228 



of debt service cost and State Construction 
Aid receipts. 

Upon a thorough review, it appeared evident 
that this inequity was due solely to the meth- 
od of the application of State Construction 
Aid and its apportionment. The general op- 
erating budget, the principal and interest 
payments for debt service and the application 
of Federal Aid were found to be apportioned 
in an equitable fashion (proportional to the 
student population of the towns) . 

The Regional School District is allocated an 
amount of State Construction Aid for each con- 
struction project undertaken by the Region. 

The present agreement handles the application 
of this State Construction Aid in the follow- 
ing manner: 

The State Construction Aid is applied to the 
debt service and apportioned to each town 
largely on the basis of the student popula- 
tion at the time the construction was init- 
iated. Thus, the inequity is really due 
mainly to the fixing of the two towns ' shares 
of the State Aid as of one point in time, 
while the share of costs of construction var- 
ied each year thereafter based on the student 
population ratio. 

The amendment would change this by having all 
the State, Federal and other construction aids 
applied to reduce the debt service costs and 
the net debt service is apportioned on the 
basis of the October 1 pupil ratio. The net 
result of this amendment is to increase the 
amount allocated to Lincoln approximately 
$3,000 and correspondingly reduce the Sudbury 
allocation by the same $3,000. This re-allo- 
cation of $3,000 would be effective until the 
first bond issue is paid off in 1975. 

It is important to emphasize that the above 
inequity is largely due to the State Con- 
struction Aid received against the original 



229 



building bond issue and that the State Con- 
struction Aid received against the first and 
second building additions are within a half 
of one percent of the 1965 October 1 pupil 
ratio. 

The amendment proposed by this committee is as fol- 
lows, and has been approved and deemed legal by both Town 
Counsels for adoption at the town meeting of both towns: 

To strike out the entire Section 5F and substitute 
in place thereof: 

"Effective the fiscal year commencing January 
1, 1967, any Federal, State or other aids or 
grants' received by the District shall be 
credited by the District to the construction 
cost account or the operating expense account, 
as appropriate, and the construction costs 
and operating aespenses to be apportioned to 
the member towns under Sections 5 (b) , 5 (e) , 
and 9 hereof shall be the net costs after the 
application of such aids or grants." 

This wording also meets with the approval of the 
Regional School Committee, which has agreed to the follow- 
ing procedure: 

"In submitting the 1967 budget to the member towns 
on December 1, 1966, the Regional School Committee 
would certify to two apportionment dollar amounts 
for each town. The first would be based on the 
present agreement. The second would be based on 
the agreement as amended, and would be the correct 
apportionment if the member towns passed the amend- 
ment to the Regional Agreement at or before the Town 
Meeting at which the budget was accepted. " 

This committee makes the following additional recom- 
mendations : 

1. The Lincoln- Sudbury Regional District agree- 
ment be reviewed by a joint town committee at 
least once every five years for its efficacy 
and fairness to the member towns. 

2. There are some procedural points in the agree- 

230 



ment that need clarification or modernization 
and that the Regional School Committee act 
and recommend to the towns appropriate amend- 
ments. 

These are to be submitted to the Regional 
School Committee in a letter from this review 
committee. 

Finally, those who have reviewed the history 
and progress of the Regional District in pre- 
paring this report, believe that through the 
towns the Regional Committee be charged to be 
constantly mindful of their obligation to rep- 
resent the continuing interest of the two 
towns in the maintenance of one school dis- 
trict. 



231 




The White Church 



Statistical Information 



VITAL STATISTICS 



44 births, 54 marriages and 24 deaths have been recorded 
during the year, 1966, as follows: 



Date 


of 


Birth 


Jan. 


3 


Jan. 


12 


Jan. 


24 


Jan. 


28 


Mar. 


5 


Mar. 


9 


Mar. 


12 


Mar. 


16 


Mar. 


22 


Mar. 


23 


Mar. 


27 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



Jessie Elizabeth Patten 
Edward Graham MacMahon 
Alison Hart Terrell 
Robert Douglass Donaldson 
Daniel Merritt Stone 
Lisa Lindgren Mount 
Holly Emaleen Dickey 
Paula Jeanne Kennedy 
Margaret Merwin Hobbs 
Pamela Ruth Fenton 
Nathaniel Saltonstall 



Warren & Judith R. Patten 
D'Arcy G. & Lucia MacMahon 
John H. & Mary H.J. Terrell 
David M. & Lynn Donaldson 
Merritt A. & Deborah Stone 
Wayne D. & Claire L. Mount 
Dana H. & Emy P. B. Dickey 
John T. & Virginia Kennedy 
John & Elizabeth A. Hobbs 
Dean E. & Barbara Fenton 
William G. , Jr. & Katrina 
A. J. Saltonstall 



232 



Date < 


Df 


Birth 




Apr. 


4 


Apr. 


8 


Apr. 


8 


Apr. 


15 


Apr. 


17 


Apr. 


27 


May 


2 


May 


5 


May 


5 


May 


6 


May 


10 


June 


9 


June 


23 


June 


23 


July 


1 


July 


10 


July 


21 


Aug. 


2 


Aug. 


17 


Aug. 


22 


Aug. 


26 


Aug. 


28 


Aug. 


30 


Sept. 


1 


Sept. 


13 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


14 


Oct. 


16 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


18 


Nov. 


23 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



Andrea Marie Stenner 
Susan Katherine Bernardin 

Valerie Kay Bodkin 
Sara Hamlyn Mason 

Tengren 

Nicholas Ayres Jesson 

Lincoln Scott Chin 
Rachel Rebecca Keevil 
Christopher Billings Swift 
Jessica Abigail Cherniack 

Melina Monique McCain 
William Alexander Smyth 
Leo no re Parker 
Katherine Couling Dwyer 
Christine Hope Ricci 
Julie Christine Sawyer 
Charles Frederick Giles, 

II 
William Abbott Pike 
Victoria Louise Raja 
Robert Bruce Kahn 
Celia Girard Pastoriza 
Shauna M. Lo 
David Matthew Kaplan 
Amy Elizabeth Balser 
Lisa Daniele Braude 
Angela Catherine Basile 
Kristin Lee Hagberg 

Kristin Elizabeth Hutchins 

Kelly Ann Johnson 
Mary Ann Tarantino ) 
Elizabeth Ann Tarantino ) 
Alison Ivy Shapiro 
Peter J. Froehlich 



John M. & Sheila Stenner 
George P. & Barbara C. 

Bernardin 
John F. & Marilyn Bodkin 
Thomas M. & Margot A. Mason 
Peter & Sheila C. Tengren 
Denis M. & Marguerite E.A. 

Jesson 
Jock P. & Grace Y. Q. Chin 
Charles & Hannah M.S. Keevil 

David A. & Sarah Swift 
Jerome R. & Elizabeth B. C. 

Cherniack 
William C. & Marilyn McCain 
Robert R. & Adella C. Smyth 
Leo W. & Valerie P. Parker 
James L. M. & Carol Dwyer 
Theodore D. & Janet Ricci 
John S. & Laura P.B. Sawyer 

John R. & Sarah W.H. Giles 
John A. & Mary S. H. Pike 
Roy M. & Ellen W. A. Raja 
Martin H. & Susan B. Kahn 
James & Ruth B. Pastoriza 
Steven S. T. & Yi-Chao M. Lo 
Leonard J. & Pearl Kaplan 
Martin & Arienne B.S. Balser 
Stephen E. & Bettie J. Braud 
Angelo & Catherine G. Basile 
Richard S., Jr. & June L. A. 

Hagberg 
John C. & Eleanor B. H. 

Hutchins 
Karl D. & Christina Johnson 
Francis P. & Carolyn R. F. 

Tarantino 
Laban D. & Susan R. Shapiro 
Raymond J. & Lorraine A. B. 

Froehlich 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



Jan. 



30 



Anthony M. Venier 

Catherine Bradford Macdonald 



Lincoln, Mass. , 
Lexington, Mass 



233 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



Feb. 1 Harry Oliver Davis, Jr. 
Paula Maude Tokarski 

Feb. 12 Jonathan Ellis Little 
Lydia Russell Hedge 

Mar. 4 Mark Alan Chaves 

Wendla Theresa Assersen 

Mar. 5 Richard Claire Evans 

Jacqueline Anne Demers 

Mar. 29 Frank R. Pirrello, Jr. 
Mary Lois Huff 

Apr. 16 Daniel Monsen 

Rosaleen McAvoy 

Apr. 30 Joseph R. Crowley 
Patricia A. Powers 

May 4 Edwin Gardner Lake 
Frances I. Browning 

May 7 Peter Patrick Herman 
Mary G. McPhee 

May 21 Christian Marc Boegner 
Mary Caroline Rogers 

June 11 John Walter Dougherty 
Marcia Ann Dorsey 

June 11 Richard James Diephuis 
Shirley Clara Bockoven 

June 11 William J. Dunn 

Barbara J. Chausse 

June 11 Richard Cotton 

Anne Pardee Buxton 

June 18 Gary Stephens Hill 
Martha Norton 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Wayland, Mass. 

Wayne, New Jersey 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
West Concord, Mass. 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lexington, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Shelter Island, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Somerville, Mass. 

Westbury, Long Island 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Melrose, Mass. 

St. Simon Island, Ga. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Chicago, Illinois 
East Setauket, N. Y. 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Lincoln, Mass. 



June 19 Philip W. Bush 

Imelda Maria Busch 

June 25 James Martin Giurleo 

Elaine Marguerite Fafard 

July 3 Thomas P. Finnerty 
Theresa Ruggiero 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Fairhaven, Mass 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 



234 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



July 16 Arthur S. Huber 

Janet S. Stankowski 

July 23 Paul Ernst Giese 
Lucretia Hoover 

Aug. 13 George Brookman Felts, Jr. 
Helen Waldron Smith 

Aug. 20 Richard E. Bulkley 
Helen M. Carroll 

Aug. 20 Joseph L. Bertolami 

Paulette Frances Fineman 

Aug. 27 Gibbs Kinderman 

Katherine Bancroft Schlesinger 

Aug. 27 James E. Blout 

Martha Livengood 

Aug. 27 Richard M. Kirby 
Dorothy Adkins 

Aug. 27 Frederick William Bierwirth, II 
Jane Ellen Gray 

Aug. 27 Lucius W. Evans 

Cynthia Ferris Kimball 

Sept. 3 Joseph D. Cotoni, Jr. 
Sandra L. MacQuarrie 

Sept. 3 William G. Wilkinson 
Faith A. Bradford 

Sept. 10 Patrick J. Dougherty 
Carroll L. Ahern 

Sept. 10 A. Ralph Pullo 
Pamela Black 

Sept. 11 Peter Tolford Gregg 
Linda Lea Vandermay 

Sept. 17 Peter Mullen Smith 
Jeanne Clapp Healey 

Sept. 24 Stephen James Nicoli 
Joanne Bernice Burke 



Bangor, Maine 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Seattle, Washington 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Chelsea, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 

Bluefield, W. V. 
Cambri dge , Ma s s . 

Newton Center, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Westfield, N. J. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 

West Concord, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 

New Bedford, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Eastham, Mass. 

Teddington, N. J. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 



235 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



Sept. 24 

Sept. 2 5 

Oct. 1 

Oct. 8 

Oct. 15 

Oct. 15 

Oct. 15 

Nov. 6 

Nov. 10 

Nov. 12 

Nov. 19 

Nov. 12 

Nov. 26 

Nov. 26 

Dec. 3 

Dec. 29 

Dec. 29 

Dec. 30 



Louis Kish 

Lisette Aimee Dufey 

Edmund Medford Huntley 
Nancy Kathryn Strate 

Bruce MacLeod 
Dorothy Buerger 

William F. McGarron 
Margaret A. Shea 

J. Laurence O'Keefe, Jr. 
Deborah L. Donovan 

Ralph William Murray, Jr, 
Bettie Jane Dever 

Patrick Reynell Browne 
Karen M. C. Comeau 

Manley B. Boyce, II 
Karen Keene 

Kimball S. Stevens 
Caryl Rotherman Willis 

Bruce A. Delagi 
Frances M. Kelly 

John Henry Norton 
Barbara Lee Delap 

Richard Perry Leavitt 
Linda Starr Carpenter 

Alden Briggs 

Karen Lynne Stansberry 

Gardner M. Stahlman 
Mary J. McDonald 

Henry Parsons Hall 
Sarah F. S. Chapin 

Peter Piona 

Mary A. C. Scholz 

Michael P. Belanger 
Gisa Scholfze Durand 

John Herbert Demer 
Nora Rebekah Sykes 



Mineola, Long Island 
Lincoln/ Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
South Acton, Mass. 

Bedford, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Danvers, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Winchester, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
West Concord, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Marshfield, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
New Haven, Conn. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Bristol, Conn. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Wo burn, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Arlington, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cheshire, Conn. 
Portland, Maine 



236 



DEATHS 

Age 

Date of Death Name Years Months Days 

Ida J. Barbour 89 19 

Mary G. O'Brien 61 11 27 

Albert B. Ozsvath 83 3 10 

Arthur A. Stockellburg 7 5 2 10 

Caroline Cotoni 85 9 13 

Mabel W. (Hatheway) Todd 57 1 6 

Joel W. Kjellander 78 3 14 

John J. Rooney 53 5 29 

Claude Wellington Irwin 76 8 6 

Cleland Ruthven Austin 82 3 6 

Jane H. Sagendorph 88 2 2 3 

Mary A. M. Neville 82 2 19 

Winifred G. Conlin 57 2 21 



1965 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


20 


1966 


Jan. 


5 


Jan. 


18 


Jan. 


23 


Feb. 


4 


Feb. 


10 


Feb. 


21 


Mar. 


16 


Apr. 


9 


Apr. 


16 


May 


11 


June 


21 


July 


3 


Aug. 


9 


Sept. 


7 


Oct. 


11 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


16 


Nov. 


23 


Nov. 


23 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


23 



William H. Smith 69 6 10 

Camilla G. Kellegrew 74 6 12 

Lisa Wollmar 4 6 19 

Marcia E. Killay 20 7 22 

James E. Burke 56 3 16 
John Lightbody 

James A. Dwyer 66 7 20 

Ernest B. Taylor 88 3 13 

Donald L. Brown 66 4 11 
James Moore 
Carol A. Lewis 

Daniel E. Sherman 94 3 

Lyle M. Richardson 75 3 15 
237 



89 





61 


11 


83 


3 


75 




85 


9 


57 


1 


78 


3 


53 


5 


76 


8 


82 


3 


88 


2 


82 


2 


57 


2 


69 


6 


74 


6 


4 


6 


20 


7 


56 


3 


85 


- 


66 


7 


88 


3 


66 


4 


19 


- 


19 


- 


94 


6 


75 


3 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Adams , 
Adams, 
Adams, 
Adams , 
Adams , 



& Barbara 
& Dorothea 



Co, 



& Dorothy- 
Estate of 



Abbott, John A. & Diana B. 
Adams, Faneuil 

John Quincy 

John Quincy & Lucy D. 

Ramelle 

Raymond D. & Margaret 

Thomas B. 
Adamson, William M. 
Adkins, Archibald W 
Adler, Harold 
Adler, Ivy Ruth 
Algeo, Leo J. & Elaine T. 
Algonquin Gas Transmission 
Allen, Robert L. & Carol E. 
Allison, William S. & Caroline 
American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Ammen, David L. & Judith B. 
Amory, Ethel C. 
Anderson, Carl L. & Dorothy 
Anderson, Lawrence B. & Rosina 

DuPont 
Andrews, Francis 
Andrews, Paul R. 

Catherine L. 
Angell, Craig W. 
Angelo, Gaspar & 
Aprille, Thomas J. & Amelia J. 
Aptekar, Herbert H. & Florence 
Aptt, Harry S. & Etta E. 
Armstrong, C. Robert & Peggy M. 
Armstrong, Virginia (Estate of) 
Armstrong, William A., Jr. & 

Mary H. 
Aschenbrenner, Bert C. & Ann E. 
Ashworth, Harold T. & Irma D. 
Atchley, Dana W. , Jr. & 

Barbara S. P. 
Austin, Richard C. & Marcia W. 
Avery, Abigail D. 

Badger, Sherwin C. , Jr. & 

Mary E. 
Baggs, Arthur, Jr. £ Marion S. 
Bailey, Richard B. 
Bailey, Richard B. <k Rebecca B. 
Baker, John C. & Elizabeth E. 
Baldwin, Herbert L. & Beatrice 



& Carolyn G. 
Eda Polcari 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 34,400 


$1,204.00 




3,800 


133.00 


850 




29.75 




136,600 


4,781.00 




74,700 


2,614.50 




29,600 


1,036.00 


440 




15.40 




31,800 


1,113.00 




29,000 


1,015.00 




67,500 


2,362.50 




300 


10.50 




15,400 


539.00 


47,900 




1,676.50 




33,600 


1,176.00 




43,300 


1,515.50 


63,200 


24,800 


3,080.00 




46,000 


1,610.00 




31,900 


1,116.50 




30,900 


1,081.50 




49,900 


1,746.50 




56,800 


1,988.00 


• 


11,900 


416.50 




56,300 


1,970.50 




54,700 


1,914.50 




13,300 


465.50 




30,900 


1,081.50 




17,300 


605.50 




24,800 


868.00 




27,500 


962.50 




36,000 


1,260.00 




35,500 


1,242.50 




24,400 


854.00 




40,200 


1,407.00 




56,100 


1,963.50 




33,800 


1,183.00 




43,400 


1,519.00 




29,600 


1,036.00 


170 


700 


30.45 




47,900 


1,676.50 




9,600 


336.00 




38,300 


1,340.50 



2 38 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Baldwin, Robert H. & Susan E. 

Baldwin, William H. & Agnes D. 

Ballou, Mildred A. 

Balser, Martin & Arienne S. 

Baltrush, William C. & Sarah 

Barbarow, Ruth 

Barber, John W. , Jr. & Mary E. 

Barbera, Anthony A. & Eleanor 

Bardsley, Theodore J. & Doris 

Bare, Bruce M. & Helen S. 

Barkas, Christopher W. & 

Mary Ann 
Barker, William R. & Barbara 
Barnaby, John M. & Charlotte 
Barnard, Helen Ogden 
Barnecut, Leo J. , Jr. & Alysse 
Barnes, Benjamin A. & Ann B. 
Barr, Edgar E. & Olive H. 
Barry, Harold W. & Annabel H. 
Barthel, Walter 
Barthel, Walter & Emma C. 
Bartlett, Nancy W. 
Basile, Angelo & Catherine 
Bastress, E. Karl & Anne W. 
Batter, John F. 

Beal, Thomas P., Jr. & Barbara 
Beaton, Daniel R. & Shirley G. 
Belanger, Walter E. & Mary F. 
Belcastro, Cynthia D. 
Beldock, George J. 
Belle, Gene & Irene 
Belleau, Thomas & Karen 
Bellizia, Francis E. & Mary H. 
Benesh, Charles L. & Thelma E. 
Bennett, Richard K. & Doris S. 
Benton, Carl R. & Barbara A. 
Bergen, Kenneth W. 
Bernardin, George F. & 

Barbara C. 
Bertolami, Leo 

Billings, Bruce H. & Sarah W. 
Bingham, Elizabeth P. B. 
Bisbee, Marie E. 
Bishop, Fern W. 
Black, Everett A. & Anne E. 
Blais, George A. 
Blais, George A. & Annette C. 



170 



3,920 



79,400 
1,900 
12,700 
31,400 
11,400 
9,200 
21,500 
33,800 
15,900 
35,100 

26,400 
19,200 
26,400 
31,100 
45,800 
39,600 
34,100 
5,500 

100 
23,900 
32,800 
15,000 
49,500 
37,100 
38,200 
22,300 
28,700 
20,400 
15,200 
24,500 
20,700 
27,500 
6,400 
21,200 

300 
66,500 

24,600 

23,700 

7,900 

6,000 

19,500 

17,000 

136,900 

20,400 



2,779.00 

66.50 

444.50 

1,099.00 
399.00 
322.00 
752.50 

1,183.00 
556.50 

1,228.50 



924.00 

672.00 

924.00 

1,088.50 

1,603.00 

1,386.00 

1,193.50 

192.50 

3.50 

836.50 

1,148.00 

525.00 

1,732.50 

1,298.50 

1,337.00 

780.50 

1,004.50 

714.00 

532.00 

857.50 

724.50 

962.50 

224.00 

742.00 

10.50 

2,333.45 

861.00 
829.50 
276.50 
210.00 
682.50 
595.00 
4,791.50 
137.20 
714.00 



239 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 

Bockoven, John S. 

Bockoven, John S. ^ Dorothy 

Boersner, Wolfram A. & Doris 

Bogner, Walter F. & Edith 

Boisvert, Henry A. & Blanche 

Bolt, Richard H. & Katherine 

Bolton, Stanwood K. & Thalia 

Bomengen, Allen & Ethel A. 

Bonaceto, Anthony & Grace 

Bonia, Walter J. 

Booth, Alice Burrage 

Booth, Robert H. 

Boston & Maine Railroad 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 

Boston Edison Company 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowles, Estate of William 

Bowman, Edward F. & Doreen 

Boyce, Manley B. & Alice M. 

Boyce, Mary M. 

Boyer, Edward 

Boyer, John H. 

Boyer, Louis L. & Elaine T. 

Bradford, Robert L. & Martha 

Bradley, Clifford & Jeannette 

Bradley, Junia T. 

Brannen, Robert C. & Barbara 

Braude, Stephen E. & Bettie J 

Braun, Morton B. & Esther K. 

Brennan, William L. & Eleanor 

Brewster, Ellen Beebe 

Briggs, Susan L. 

Brisson, Norman F 

Bronson, Franklin 

Catherine M. 
Brooks, Paul 
Brown, Elizabeth G. 
Brown, Joan Nicker son 
Brown, John B. & Ann P. 
Brown, Robert W. 
Browne, Secor D. 
Brownel 1 , Robert 
Browning, Edgar 
Browning, George U. 
Browning, Katherine A. 
Buckler, Sheldon A. & Marilyn 



& Evelyn W. 
C. & 



& Lee G. 
& Mary D. 
G. & Ruth M, 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 1,100 


$ 38.50 


340 




11.90 




22,700 


794.50 




6,300 


220.50 




35,400 


1,239.00 




16,900 


591.50 




47,600 


1,666.00 




24,200 


847.00 




16,300 


570.50 




28,400 


994.00 




27,100 


948.50 




2,400 


84.00 




64,900 


2,271.50 




2,000 


70.00 


425,000 




14,875.00 


1,142,440 


9,900 


40,331.90 




29,400 


1,029.00 




21,100 


738.50 




22,200 


777.00 




59,900 


2,096.50 




28,600 


1,001.00 




65,100 


2,278.50 




5,400 


189.00 




20,100 


703.50 




18,600 


651.00 




10,600 


371.00 




38,200 


1,337.00 




23,700 


829.50 




43,400 


1,519.00 




35,400 


1,239.00 




21,400 


749.00 




100 


3.50 




6,100 


213.50 




22,400 


784.00 




27,100 


948.50 


340 


47,200 


1,663.90 




55,300 


1,935.50 




24,500 


857.50 




17,700 


619.50 




10,500 


367.50 




31,300 


1,095.50 




58,600 


2,051.00 


3,480 




121.80 




22,700 


794.50 




12,400 


434.00 




39,800 


1,393.00 



240 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Buerger, Martin J. & Lila 
Bulkley, Joel 

Bulkley, Joel B. & Doris L. 
Burckett, Douglas M. 
Burckett, Douglas M. & 

Phillippa C. 
Burgess, William A. 
Burk, George W. & Ruth M. 
Burke, James E. & Margaret M. 
Burke, Ruth Bemis 
Burns, Melvin P. & Elizabeth 
Burroughs, Eugene L. & June M. 
Burt, William F. & Donna G. 
Burton, William deK. & 

Priscilla 
Butcher, Alfred G. & Helen M. 
Butcher, Henry A. , Jr. & 

Margaret V. 
Butler, Hector & Audrey E. 
Butler, William B. & Mary Jane 
Butler, William H. & Nancy G. 
Butts, Louise M. 

Calkins, Charles W. & Thelma E. 
Calkins, Charles W. , Jr. 
Calkins, Charles W. , Jr. & 

Martha A. 
Calkins, Ramona T. 
Callahan, Thomas R. 
Campobasso, Anthony B. & 

Dorothy M. 
Campobasso, Joseph R. 
Cannon, Ellen DeN. & Bradford 
Cantella, Anthony J. & 

Brianne B. 
Caras, Byron & Anastasia 
Caras, Ophair & Florence L. 
Carew, John M. & Alice M. 
Carley, John A. & Joan Keir 
Carney, Florence T. 
Carney, James J. & Agnes M. 
Carroll, Marjory M. 
Carstensen, Warren & Evelyn G. 
Caskey, Walter H. & Anna H. 
Cassidy, Henry J. & Verna E. 
Cassidy, Robert E. & Isabelle 
Cassis, Anthony 
Caswell, John R. & Carol B. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 42,400 


$ 1,484.00 


170 




5.95 




45,100 


1,578.50 


100 




3.50 




34,500 


1,207.50 




8,000 


280.00 




19,800 


693.00 




51,800 


1,813.00 




48,000 


1,680.00 




19,200 


672.00 




41,000 


1,435.00 




24,000 


840.00 




42,300 


1,480.50 




17,500 


612.50 




12,600 


441.00 




22,100 


773.50 




22,900 


801.50 




24,200 


847.00 




58,400 


2,044.00 




21,100 


738.50 


5,700 




199.50 




34,800 


1,218.00 




10,200 


357.00 




30,000 


1,050.00 




16,700 


584.50 




13,100 


458.50 




134,500 


4,707.50 




49,200 


1,722.00 




26,400 


924.00 




21,000 


735.00 




15,800 


553.00 




40,800 


1,428.00 




14,700 


514.50 




19,200 


672.00 




18,300 


640.50 




58,900 


2,061.50 




30,000 


1,050.00 




15,200 


-532.00 




18,800 


658.00 




26,900 


941.50 




27,600 


966.00 



241 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



& Mary E. 
Jessie T. 
Leona G. 
Bertha L. 



Cate, Philip T. , Jr 

Marjorie W. 
Causer, William 
Chadwick, William & 
Champeny, John C. & 
Chapin, Louise B. & 
Chapin, Margaret E. 
Chapman, James S. & Emily M. 
Charles R. Dexter, Inc. 
Chellis, Herbert N. & Eleanor 
Chin, Jock P. £ Grace Y. Q. 
Chiotelis, Charles L. & Iasme 
Chipman, Robert H. & Mary F. 
Chisholm, Edward C. & Margaret 
Chittick, Mary G. & Suesens, 

Eleanor G. 
Chu, Ge Yao & Wei Ying 
Church, Robert T. & Priscilla S. 
Ciampi, Emilio & Mary P. 
Cibel, Stanley A. & Thelma W. 
Ciraso, Amelia 
Clare, Mary E. 

Clark, Clifford A. & Patricia D. 
Clark, Vern & Velma M. 
Clark, William T. & Catharine T. 
Coan, Thomas & Catherine M. 
Coane, John H. , Jr. 
Coburn, Arthur L 
Coburn, Edward S. 
Codman, Dorothy S. F. 
Codman, Dorothy S. F. 

Roger B. & Fawcett, 

Trustees 
Coffey, John B. & Wilma L. 
Coffin, Stewart T. & Jane M. L 
Cole, Edwin M. & Lucy F. 
Comer ford, John F. & Mary G. 
Comjean, Marc G. & Judith K. 
Comstock, Charles B. & Joan M. 
Comstock, Joan M. 
Conant, Lily R. 
Condit, Robert P. 
Conley, Barclay 
Conlin, James J. & Winifred I. 
Connair, John J. & Ferro, 

Jacqueline 
Connolly, J. Irving & Evelyn 



III, & Ann B. 



M. 

M., Tyler, 
Benjamin T. 



170 



46,400 
18,400 
22,900 
30,800 
52,100 
18,100 
18,200 
83,000 
17,200 
13,600 
23,700 
20,000 
21,300 

27,200 
25,200 
43,200 
24,900 
24,300 
21,200 
21,700 
26,300 
19,200 
37,500 
15,000 
12,700 
25,600 
34,400 
32,000 



189,900 
17,600 
24,800 
40,800 
24,600 
34,300 
24,200 
19,900 
48,300 
21,500 

16,100 

20,700 
8,600 



1,624.00 
644.00 
801.50 

1,078.00 

1,823.50 
633.50 
637.00 

2,905.00 
602.00 
476.00 
829.50 
700.00 
745.50 

952.00 
882.00 

1,512.00 
871.50 
850.50 
742.00 
759.50 
920.50 
672.00 

1,312.50 
525.00 
444.50 
896.00 

1,204.00 

1,120.00 



6,646.50 
616.00 
868.00 

1,428.00 
861.00 

1,200.50 
847.00 
696.50 

1,690.50 

752.50 

5.95 

563.50 

724.50 
301.00 



242 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 




Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


Connolly, John Irving, Jr. 


$ 


$ 600 


$ 21.00 


Conrad, Walter C. & Margaret M. 




3,400 


119.00 


Conroy, Grace W. 




17,800 


623.00 


Constantine, Philip J. 




24,300 


850.50 


Cook, Ethel 


1,550 




54.25 


Cook, Harry & Kathleen G. 




31,500 


1,102.50 


Cook, John F. & Ethel A. 




11,900 


416.50 


Cook, Paul (Est. of) & 








Jacqueline H. 




20,300 


710.50 


Cook, Paul W. , Jr. & Marian M. 




38,300 


1,340.50 


Coolidge, Henry P. & Alice C. 




41,300 


1,445.50 


Coons, Richard D. & Nancy J. 




58,800 


2,058.00 


Cope, Oliver & Alice DeN. 




37,400 


1,309.00 


Cope, Thomas Pym & Elizabeth W. 




31,700 


1,109.50 


Corcoran, Robert P. & Elizabeth 




40,200 


1,407.00 


Cormack, Allan M. 




3,800 


133.00 


Corrigan, Anna G. , Adm. 




15,900 


556.50 


Corrigan, Leo W. 




11,100 


388.50 


Corrigan, Mary 




35,300 


1,235.50 


Corrigan, Mary K. 




10,400 


364.00 


Cotoia, Anthony J. & Lucy M. A. 




30,500 


1,067.50 


Cotoni, Carolana M. 




20,200 


707.00 


Coughlin, Francis B. & Mary T. 




6,400 


224.00 


Courtney, Joseph Donald 




17,500 


612.50 


Cousins, Ashley B. 




10,200 


357.00 


Cousins, Bessie M. 




20,400 


714.00 


Cousins, Lawrence B. (Est. of) 








& Jeanne B. 




30,000 


1,050.00 


Cowles, Addison & Alexandra C. 




19,900 


696.50 


Crandall, Stephen H. & Patricia 




44,900 


1,571.50 


Crawford, John D. & Joanna W. 




35,800 


1,253.00 


Crook, Constance S. 




18,000 


630.00 


Crowson, Leslie W. & Madeline W. 




28,000 


980.00 


Culver, Perry J. 


170 




5.95 


Culver, Perry J. & Kate S. 




74,700 


2,614.50 


Cummings, William R. & Palma M. 




24,100 


843.50 


Cunningham, J. Lewis & Ruth P. 




21,200 


742.00 


Cunningham, Robert A. & Margaret 




36,900 


1,291.50 


Cunningham, Robert M. 




23,800 


833.00 


Curran, Robert J. 




52,700 


1,844.50 


Cushman Realty Trust, William F. 








Cushman, Trustee 




3,500 


122.50 


Dadmun, Harrie H. & Helen 




44,300 


1,550.50 


Dahl, Thyra 




21,100 


738.50 


D'Alleva, Carmine 


1,330 




46.55 


D'Alleva, Franco 


1,800 




63.00 


Dalli, Francis J. & Mary E. 




35,700 


1,249.50 



243 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Danosky, 
Da no sky, 
Danosky, 
Darling, 



Dalrymple, Chester & Jean 
Dalrymple, Sidney C. & 

Dorothy C. 
Damico, Louise 
Daniels, Bruce G. & Janet B. 
Edward A. 

Edward A. & Mary C. 
Stefania 
Eugene M. , Jr. 
D'Arrigo Brothers Company of 

Massachusetts 
d'Autremont, Chester 
d'Autremont, Chester C. & Ruth 
David Buttrick Company 
Davidson, Robert W. & Cynthia A 
Davis, Alfred M. 

D. Bradford & Barbara G. 
Henry R. , Jr. 
Jacqueline 
Prescott L. 

Ronald C. & Barbara C. 
Saville R. & Anita V. 
Sherman P. & Phyllis M. 
William H. 
Alice P. 

& Ruth K. 



Davis, 

Davis, 

Davis, 

Davis, 

Davis, 

Davis, 

Davis, 

Davis, 

Davison, 

Dawes, Donald L, 

Day, Mildred 

Dean, Emma W. 

Dean, Wendell A. & Maybelle L. 

Dean, William M. 

Dean, William M. & Lorraine C. 

DeCilio, Frank W. & Josephine 

Dee, Helena A. 

DeFord, William & Elinor S. 

De Jesus, John & Geneva Ann 

Demone, Harold W. & Elsie R. 

Denehy, Edward J. & Bernadette 

Denholm, A. Stuart & Jane L. 

Denisevich, Helen 

DeNormandie, James, Executor 

James 

James 



DeNormandie, 
DeNormandie, 
DeNormandie, 

Ellen DeN. 
Derderian, Edith H. 
desCognets, Archer B. & 

Gwendolyn G. 



& Martha 
James, Cannon, 
& Cope, Alice DeN, 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 54,400 


$ 1,904.00 




44,200 


1,547.00 




23,200 


812.00 




51,200 


1,792.00 




6,900 


241.50 




20,100 


703.50 


2,780 


34,900 


1,318.80 




30,500 


1,067.50 




14,200 


497.00 


200 




7.00 




75,700 


2,649.50 




56,600 


1,981.00 


L . 


12,500 


437.50 




20,600 


721.00 




31,300 


1,095.50 


200 




7.00 




13,100 


633.50 




57,000 


1,995.00 




21,600 


756.00 




41,000 


1,435.00 




16,200 


567.00 




18,900 


661.50 




50,100 


1,753.50 




18,900 


661.50 




9,800 


343.00 




15,300 


535.50 




35,900 


1,256.50 




6,500 


227.50 




15,900 


556.50 




23,300 


815.50 




18,500 


647.50 




38,100 


1,333.50 




27,500 


962.50 




48,500 


1,697.50 




46,200 


1,617.00 




6,200 


217.00 




28,600 


1,001.00 




74,700 


2,614.50 




109,600 


3,836.00 




80,200 


2,807.00 




28,300 


990.50 




15,400 


539.00 




51,000 


1,785.00 



244 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Dewey, Davis R. 
Dexter, Barbara 
Dickey, Dana H. 
Dickie, Richard 
DiGiovanni, Guy 
Diminico, Louis 
Dixon, George M. 
Dixon, Russell J 



II 
C. 

& Emy P. 
I. & Julia G. 
P. & Teresa E. 
& Antonetta 

& Anna R. 
& Theresa J. 



170 



Doherty, Elizabeth H. 
Doherty, Mary E. , Margaret A. , 

& Marjorie 
Doherty ' s Garage, Inc. 
Domenichella, Domenic 

M. 



Estate of Charlotte 
Gordon A. 



Adm. 



Jr, 

Jr. 

Jr., 
P., Gordon 
Peck, Jean 
Marion L. 



Domenichella, Mattie 
Donaldson 
Donaldson 
Donaldson, Gordon A. 

Elizabeth A. 
Donaldson, Malcolm L 
Donaldson, Robert D. 
Donaldson, Robert D. 
Donaldson, Robert D. 

Malcolm L., Donald 

A. , Charlotte L. & 
Donnell, Samuel H. & 
Donovan, Leo A. & Elinor C. 
Dorian, Newart 

Dougherty, Allen R. & Helen M. 
Dougherty, Denis M. & Marion C 
Dougherty, Mary Grace, Admx. 
Doughty, Joseph M. & Martha L. 
Dow, Sterling, III, & Eleonore 
Downing, Grace L. 
Doyle, Albert R. & Evelyn M. 
Drake, Lillian W. & Garmory, 

Bertha V. 
Drew, Frederic T. & Shirley D. 
Dreyfus, Pierre M. & Dorothy R 
Duane, Jerome J 
DuBois, Anson M 
Duffy, James E. 

Barbara G. 

Durnan, John P. 

Dustin, Daniel 

Dwyer, James L, 



& Rosalind G. 
& Olive S. 
Ill, & 



1,020 



2,220 



340 



& Leona E. 
E. & Rachel S. 
& Carol 
Dwyer, Warren R. & Marilyn H. 



78,300 
68,000 
18,700 
21,900 
25,700 
48,300 
2,100 
26,100 
44,100 

16,600 
41,300 
2,500 
44,200 
30,000 



41,600 

28,000 

189,600 

20,000 



28,700 
37,000 
63,500 
16,900 
14,800 
17,400 
1,800 
16,800 
15,100 
16,600 
20,100 

17,800 
12,900 
38,400 
39,600 
18,600 

31,500 
23,600 
25,900 
17,400 
22,400 



2,746.45 

2, 380.00 
654.50 
766.50 
899.50 

1,690.50 

73.50 

913.50 

1,543.50 

581.00 
1,481.20 

87.50 
1,624.70 
1,050.00 

11.90 

1,456.00 
980.00 

6,636.00 
700.00 



1,004.50 

1,295.00 

2,222.50 

591.50 

518.00 

609.00 

63.00 

588.00 

528.50 

581.00 

703.50 

623.00 

451.50 

1,344.00 

1,386.00 

651.00 

1,102.50 
826.00 
906.50 
609.00 
784.00 



245 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



East, Edla 

Eaton, Richard J. & Gertrude S 
Eckhardt, Homer D. & Mary G. 
Edmonds, Dean S., Jr. & Louise 
Ehlert, Caroline E. 
Elder, George D. & Diana H. 
Elliott, Robert H. & Ethel M. 
Elliott, William G. & Peggy P. 
Emerson, Claire G. 
Emmons, A. Bradlee & Judith R. 
England. Albert E. & Priscilla 
Eppling, Frederic J. & Sarah J 
Erickson, Leonard V. & Martha 
Ericson, Herbert E. & Erlyne R 
Ernst, Martin L. & Lois 0. 
Evangelista, Florenzo T. & 

Dorothy L. 
Evans, Lucius W. & Estate of 

Virginia C. 

Faddoul, George 

Faran, James J. 

Farbish, Alfred 

Farley, Louis C 

Farley, Louis C 

Farrell, Philip J. 

Faunce, Anthony 

Faunce, Mary Gill & Anthony 

Fedock, Metro £ Hazel A. 

Felegian, Peter & Marion 0. 

Fell, Florence C. & Beverly 

Fenijn, Chris J. & Yvonne 

Fenton, Dean E. & Barbara L. 

Ferguson, Charles E. & Phyllis 

Fernald, George H. , Jr. & 

Eleanor T. 
Field, Warwick F. , Jr. & 

Rosamond R. 
Filbin, Robert & Eva M. 
Fillmore, Bruce 

Fillmore, Bruce R. & Eleanor L 
Finesinger, Abraham L. 
Finesinger, Abraham L. & 

Natalie 
Finnerty, James J. & Anna C. 
Fiorelli, Ernest R. & Rose M. 
First National Bank of Boston, 

Tr., One Federal R. E. Trust 



P. 


, & 


Natal 


.ie 


A 


Sc 


El] 


.en G. 






B. 


, & 


Rita 


F. 




, 


Jr. 








, 


Jr. 


& Isabel 


J. 


& 


Ruth 


E. 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal. 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 21,000 


$ 735.00 




35,700 


1,249.50 




28,300 


990.50 




67,800 


2,373.00 




17,900 


626.50 




30,500 


1,067.50 




22,900 


801.50 




56,300 


1,970.50 




20,600 


721.00 




49,100 


1,718.50 




50,700 


1,774.50 




22,600 


791.00 


F. 


17,800 


623.00 




31,100 


1,088.50 




52,000 


1,820.00 




16,500 


577.50 




69,800 


2,443.00 




26,000 


910.00 




36,500 


1,277.50 




19,700 


689.50 


100 




3.50 




25,200 


882.00 




28,900 


1,011.50 


170 




5.95 




50,000 


1,750.00 




17,600 


616.00 




27,700 


969.50 




14,500 


507.50 




26,700 


934.50 




22,400 


784.00 




25,100 


878.50 




67,500 


2,362.50 




19,200 


672.00 




19,800 


693.00 


750 




26.25 


m 


17,700 


619.50 




6,800 


238.00 




73,300 


2,565.50 




21,800 


763.00 




30,600 


1,071.00 




22,000 


770.00 



246 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Fisher, John W. $ 

Fitch, Marion A. 

Fitts, Charles K. (Est. of) & 

Gertrude W. 
Fitzgerald, John H. & Thelma C. 
Flaherty, Augusta D. 
Flannery, Donald J. & Harriet E. 
Flannery, Ralph & Constance H. 
Flansburgh, Earl R. & Louise H. 
Fleck, James D. & Margaret E. 
Fleck, Richard C. & Frances R. 
Fleming, Clifford D. & E. Frances 
Flewelling, Roy S. & Thelma G. 
Flint, Edith F. 
Flint, Edward & Henry R. 
Flint, George B. & Lucie S. 
Flint, Josephine R. 
Flint, Margaret S. 
Flint, Warren F. 
Floyd, Olive B. 
Flynn, Helen C. 
Foley, Harold F 
Foley, Harold W 
Forbes, Sherman H 
Fougere, Guy L. 
Foust, James T. 
Frank, Robert C. 
Fraser, Robert M. & Donna A. 
Freed, Charles & Florence W. 
French, John B. & Deborah C. 
Frost, Wesley T. & October C. 
Fryatt, Thomas F. 
Fullerton, Albert L. , Jr. & 

Mary S. 

Gagne, Lawrence E. & Dorothy Q. 
Gajewski, Ceslaus A. & Sophie 
Gandolfo, Matthew F. & Frances 
Garrison, David L. & Alice E. 
Garrison, Edith S. 
Garrison, John B. & Barbara F. 
Gary, John E. & Maida F. 
Gatchell, G. Gordon, Jr. & 

Esther A. 
Gentile, Joseph F. & Kathleen E. 
Gergen, Kenneth J. & Eleanor C. 
Gerson, Nathaniel C. & Sareen R. 



& Rita E. 

& Annabel 
& Pamela J. K. 
& Dorothy B. 
& Velma S. 



680 



$ 31,200 
70,300 

63,300 
25,000 
33,800 
12,200 
22,300 
38,100 

8,900 
44,800 
24,800 
30,000 

7,100 
28,300 
19,500 
30,400 
18,500 
63,600 
26,800 
24,100 
20,700 
40,600 
30,500 
36,300 
22,800 
51,200 
23,500 
33,600 
34,900 
10,100 
23,400 

37,300 

36,600 
23,100 
27,700 
27,000 
31,600 
41,900 
56,400 

21,600 
23,000 
17,200 
34,600 



$ 1,092.00 
2,460.50 

2,215.50 
875.00 

1,183.00 
427.00 
780.50 

1,333.50 
311.50 

1,568.00 
868.00 

1,050.00 
248.50 
990.50 
682.50 

1,064.00 
647.50 

2,249.80 
938.00 
843.50 
724.50 

1,421.00 

1,067.50 

1,270.50 
798.00 

1,792.00 
822.50 

1,176.00 

1,221.50 
353.50 
819.00 



1,305.50 

1,281.00 

808.50 

969.50 

945.00 

1,106.00 

1,466.50 

1,974.00 

756.00 

805.00 

602.00 

1,211.00 



247 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



& Dorothy A, 



Gheith, Mohamed A. 

Gibbons , Mark 

Gilbert, Francis 

Gilbert, George H. & Rebecca 

Gilbert, John W. & Josephine 

Gilbert, Mary J. 

Gilbert, Peter F. & Zeta M. 

Giles Family Trust 

Giles, John R. & Sarah H. 

Gilfoy, Donald A. 

Gillis, John G. & Maria F. 

Giurleo, James M. & Mary C. 

Glass, John B. & Florence M. 

Gleason, Nancy W. J. 

Glavine, James 

Goddard, Richard B. 

Goodwin, Herbert F. 



& Alice L. 
& Elizabeth 
L. 



Gordon, Charles W. & Frances 

Gordon, Frank W. , Jr., Admr. 

Gordon, Robert D. & Nancy M. 

Gounaris, Thomas X. & Jean G. 

Grabill, Elliott V. & Martha L. 

Graf, Malcolm 

Grande, Orlando S. & Rose P. 

Gras, Ranulf 

Gras, Ranulf W. & Annette E. 

Grason, Rufus L. & Edna B. 

Gray, Robert W. 

Greaves, Allan W. & Theresa D. 

Green, Robert T. & Catherine M. 

Greene, Frederick H. , Jr. & 

Helen H. 
Gregg, Earl F. & Doris H. 
Grim, William M. , Jr. & 

Barbara M. 
Grinnell, William L. & Virginia 
Gropius, Walter & Use 
Gross, Thomas A. 0. & Judith 
Grover, C. Stuart & Gunilda G. 
Guarino, Guy E. & Frances I. 
Gunaris, Theodore & Rheta D. 
Gurski, Richard J. & Harriett A. 
Gustafson, Craig S. & Louise M. 
Guy, Donald C. & M. Cynthia 

Haartz, John C. , Jr. & Beatrice 
Haden, Russell L. , Jr. & 
Constance J. 



170 



340 



20,200 
46,600 
13,700 
19,100 
13,900 
12,000 
28,500 
8,000 
27,500 
31,800 
18,700 
30,300 
28,900 
47,000 

17,100 
66,800 
6,700 
14,900 
38,600 
23,700 
52,500 
12,900 
51,400 

29,800 
27,800 
39,500 
16,600 
56,700 

42,000 
34,900 

20,200 
33,600 
51,300 
35,600 
30,300 
25,800 
16,500 
15,100 
26,600 
40,600 

42,000 

45,300 



707.00 

1,631.00 
479.50 
668.50 
486.50 
420.00 
997.50 
280.00 
962.50 

1,113.00 
654.50 

1,060.50 

1,011.50 

1,645.00 

5.95 

598.50 

2,338.00 
234.50 
521.50 

1,851.00 
829.50 

1,837.50 
451.50 

1,799.00 
11.90 

1,043.00 
973.00 

1,382.50 
581.00 

1,984.50 

1,470.00 
1,221.50 

707.00 

1,176.00 

1,795.50 

1,246.00 

1,060.50 

903.00 

577.50 

528.50 

931.00 

1,421.00 

1,470.00 

1,585.50 



248 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Haessler, Herbert A. & Diane F. $ 

Hagenian, Joseph C. & Irene R. 

Hagmann, Otto 

Hagmann, Otto & Katherine 

Hagopian, Richard G. & Helen 

Hale, Donald G. & Frances 

Haley, Whitney W. & Barbara 

Hall, Cecil E. & Nancy E. 

Hall, Henry P. 200 

Hall, Henry P. & Barbara G. 

Halsey, William A. & Leila W. 

Hamilton, Harry A. & Bessie E. 

Hankey, Francis W. & Edna J. 

Hanlon, Catherine L. 

Hanneman, Roger W. & Marion N. 

Hannon, William H. , Jr. & 

Louise E. 
Hanson, Adler M. & Madeline A. 
Hapgood, Norman, Jr. & Ruth K. 
Hardy, Harriet L. 
Harney, Gregory G., Jr. & 

Elizabeth E. 
Haroian, Henry & Jessie 
Haroutunian, Harry J. & 
Harrington, Clifford F. 

Winthrop W. , Jr. 
Harrington, Nancy 
Harrington, Winthrop W. 
Harris, John N. & Naomi A. 
Harris, Melvyn H. & Nancy M. 
Harris, Roger W. & Evelyn B. 
Hart, Joseph S. (Estate of) 
Hartwell Farm 7,500 

Harvey, Harriet R. 
Harwood, Reed 

Hatsopoulos, George N. & Daphne 
Hawes, Donald 0. & Lillian B. 
Haworth, George G. & Thelma E. 
Hayner, Alex W. & Kathleen T. 
Haytayan, Harry M. & Katherine 
H. B. Knowles, Inc. 9,410 

Healey, Harry R. , Jr. & Jeanne 
Healy, Edward M. & Helen T. 
Heart, Frank E. & Jane S. 
Heartt, Stephen & Charlotte B. 
Heck, Mary Higbee 
Hedge, Mary A. 



S. 

Anita G. 
Jr. & 



Jr. 



50,200 
14,900 
15,900 
16,100 
24,300 
19,500 
36,000 
32,300 

27,600 
23,900 
16,900 
30,600 
17,000 
19,900 

4,100 
29,300 
20,900 
30,100 

21,900 
27,000 
13,600 

9,700 
2,500 
18,800 
16,800 
15,100 
32,500 
5,300 

15,800 
64,700 
5,600 
27,300 
30,100 
30,900 
20,400 
56,600 
23,400 
27,600 
14,400 
33,600 
104,400 
48,100 



1,757.00 
521.50 
556.50 
563.50 
850.50 
682.50 

1,260.00 

1,130.50 

7.00 

966.00 

836.50 

591.50 

1,071.00 
595.00 
696.50 

143.50 
1,025.50 

731.50 
1,053.50 

766.50 
945.00 
476.00 

339.50 

87.50 

658.00 

588.00 

528.50 

1,137.50 

185.50 

262.50 

553.00 

2,264.50 

196.00 

955.50 

1,053.50 

1,081.50 

714.00 

2,310.35 

819.00 

966.00 

504.00 

1,176.00 

'3,654.00 

1,683.50 



249 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Helburn, Peter & Levin $ 

Alvin 
Hellman, Maurice H. & Dolores 
Hemry, Leslie P. & Mary Jane 
Henderson, Gerard C. & Edith M. 
Henderson, Robert S. 440 

Henderson, Robert S. & Carolyn 
Henley, Merrill J. & Estate of 

Ida H. 
Hennessy, Frank J., Jr. & 

Pauline G. 
Herlin, Melvin A. & Eugenia T. 
Herman, William F. 
Herthel, Stephen W. & Evelyn S. 
Hester, Leon B. & Mary B. 
Hibben, George C. & Julia K. 
Hibben, Julia K. 
Hill, Jacques A. F. 
Hill, Walter L. & Patricia C. 
Hoar, George W. & Dorothy S. & 

Hoar, Norman W. & Shirley E. 
Holbrow, Frederick & Florence G. 
Holdsworth, Dennis W. & Vega 
Holiday Homes, Inc. 
Holland, Taffy K. 
Hollingsworth, Lowell M. & 

Florence S. 
Hollister, Walter M. & J. Sally 
Home National Bank of Brockton, 

Trustee 
Hoover, Henry B. & Lucretia J. 
Hopkins, J. David, Jr. & Claire 
Horn, Michael C. & Helen C. 
Hosey, John E. & Margaret L. 
Houghton, John J. (Est. of) & 

Lillian 
Howard, Elizabeth F. 
Howard, Esther T. 
Hoyt, Harrison & Shirley J. 
Hubbard, Eliot, Jr. 
Humphreys, J. Robert & 

M. Lillian 
Hunsaker, Jerome C, Jr. 
Hunt, Caroline L. 
Hunt, Merrill T. 
Huntley, George F. & Lottie D. 
Huntley, Medford E. & Blanche L. 



85,800 
29,200 

9,900 
28,600 

1,300 
33,100 

18,400 

23,500 
37,000 
60,100 
59,000 
39, 300 
23,500 
2,900 
28,600 
32,700 

30,700 
17,400 
23,400 
98,400 
27,600 

45,900 
28,000 

24,600 
35,400 
57,800 
19,800 
17,100 

14,600 
7,800 
40,600 
21,600 
42,500 

17,200 
76,300 
5,100 
32,400 
17,000 
16,700 



3,003.00 
1,022.00 
346.50 
1,001.00 
60.90 
1,158.50 

644.00 

822.50 
1,295.00 
2,103.50 
2,065.00 
1,375.50 
822.50 
101.50 
1,001.00 
1,144.50 

1,074.50 
609.00 
819.00 

3,444.00 
966.00 

1,606.50 
980.00 

861.00 

1,239.00 

2,023.00 

693.00 

598.50 

511.00 
273.00 

1,421.00 
756.00 

1,487.50 

602.00 
2,670.50 

178.50 
1,134.00 

595.00 

584.50 



250 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Hurd, Joseph & Nellie M. 

Hurd, Nancy Dabney 

Hurff, Joseph L. & Elizabeth C. 

Husek, Joseph John & Helen 

Hutchins, John C. & Eleanor B. 

Hutchinson, James A., Jr. 

Hyde, Benjamin D. 

Hyde, Benjamin D. & Mildred B. 

Iben, Icko, Jr. 6c Miriam G. 
Ide, Kenton J. & Christel 
Ingard, K. Uno & Doris C. 
Irwin, Constance Root & Ayer, 

Harriet Root 
Irwin, Mary M. 

Jackson, Dorothy W. 

Jackson, Gardner, Jr. & Sallie 

Jackson, Huson & Polly F. 

Jacob, Fred & Eva 

Jacobs, S. Ralph & Frances L. 

Jagger, James M. *< Miriam H. 

James, Hamilton R. & Waleska E. 

Janes, G. Sargent 

Jeffery, Lawrence 

Jenney, Charles J 

Jenney, Phyllis M 

Jennings, Charles 

Jensen, Holgar J. 

Jensen, Olin A. & 

Jerodel Realty Trust 

Jetter, George C. & Mary E. 

Jevon, Robert W. 6c Virginia B. 

John, DeWitt & Mo r ley M. 

Johnson, Albert D. 

Johnson, Ernest L. & Grace M. 

Johnson, Kenneth A. 6c Gladys 

John Swanson Realty Corporation 

Jones, Ira M. 

Jozwicki, Alfons & Adeline C. 



& Ann B. 
R. & Harriet K. 
. & Katrina C. 

E. & Ann V. 
& Grace A. 
Agnes E. 



100 



45,500 
43,200 
32,200 
26,600 
25,700 
19,800 

36,900 

42,000 
22,600 
37,900 

5,800 
40,800 

46,500 
25,500 
54,800 
32,100 
73,400 
38,300 
60,600 
37,400 
40,300 
25,400 
28,700 
33,600 
18,000 
16,100 
59,000 
45,500 
33,800 
28,100 
11,900 
42,300 
19,600 
49,700 
9,100 
19,200 



1,592.50 

1,512.00 

1,127.00 

931.00 

899.50 

693.00 

3.50 

1,291.50 

1,470.00 

791.00 

1,326.50 

203.00 
1,428.00 

1,627.50 

892.50 

1,918.00 

1,123.50 

2,569.00 

1,340.50 

2,121.00 

1,309.00 

1,410.50 

889.00 

1,004.50 

1,176.00 

630.00 

563.50 

2,065.00 

1,592.50 

1,183.00 

983.50 

416.50 

1,480.50 

686.00 

1,739.50 

318.50 

672.00 



Kaelber, Edward G. & Patricia C. 
Kahn, Martin H. & Susan B. 
Kane, Henry B. & Elizabeth C. 
Kano, Cyrus H. & Dorothy 
Kasperian, Karl D. & Carol 0. 
Kaye, Harold & Alice S. 



25,200 
45,300 
15,800 
27,600 
70,600 
25,400 



882.00 
1,585.50 

553.00 

966.00 
2,471.00 

889.00 



251 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Keay, Donald P. & Mary Ann L. 
Keevil, Charles S., Jr. & 

Hannah M. 
Keily, Delbar P. & Gertrude E. 
Kelley, M. Gertrude 
Kennedy, Albert E. 
Kennedy Brothers 
Kennedy, Fitzroy 
Kennedy Land Corporation 
Kenney, John F. 
Kent, Harold E. & Muriel B. 
Kessel, Joseph B. & Lesley J. 
Ketchum, Phillips, Jr. & Anne C 
Keuper, Charles S. & Elinore W. 
Keyes, Janet T. 
Kindleberger, Charles P. & 

Sarah M. 
King, R. Bruce, Jr. & Eleanor T 
King, William Tappan & 

Elizabeth M. 
Kingsbury, Roy S. & Ann B. 
Kinsler, Louise M. 
Kirby, Gerard L. 
Kirkpatrick, David W. & 

Margaret M. 
Kistiakowsky, Irma E, 
Kjellander, Joel & Mary C. 
Klein, Ernest V. & Leonora D. 
Kling, John W. & Louise H. 
Knowles, Harry B. , Jr. 
Knowles, Wilma E. 
Koehler, Edward F. & Margaret M 
Kolligian, Gregory Scott & Zoe 
Kolodny, Myer Z. & M. Lillian 
Kolyshkin, Lena 
Kopp, Jay F. & Marilyn J. 
Korhonen, Edwin J. & Miriam 
Kornfeld, George R. & Hulen S. 
Kramer, Manuel & Ruth L. 
Kubik, Charles S. & Emily K. 
Kusleika, Steven & Louise C. 

Lahey, Heirs of James 
Lahnstein, Karl F. 
Landrey, William J. & Rita. M. 
Lang, David J. & E. Ruth 
Lang, Richard E. & Betty Lee 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 33,500 


$ 1,172.50 




32,200 


1,127.00 




17,600 


616.00 




18,600 


651.00 




3,800 


133.00 


1,870 




65.45 




28,800 


1,008.00 




23,800 


833.00 




47,400 


1,659.00 




21,900 


766.50 




30,400 


1,064.00 




30,500 


1,067.50 




43,700 


1,529.50 




24,700 


864.50 




29,500 


1,032.50 


i 


29,700 


1,039.50 




67,300 


2/355.50 




39,800 


1,393.00 




20,800 


728.00 




22,000 


770.00 




35,000 


1,225.00 




46,600 


1,631.00 




30,600 


1,071.00 




18,400 


644.00 




24,400 


854.00 


100 




3.50 




33,000 


1,155.00 




31,400 


1,099.00 




54,400 


1,904.00 




35,400 


1,239.00 




18,300 


640.50 




32,700 


1,144.50 




22,500 


787.50 




22,000 


770.00 




35,100 


1,228.50 




33,100 


1,158.50 




23,600 


826.00 




5,300 


185.50 




12,700 


444.50 




32,900 


1,151.50 




29,400 


1,029.00 




42,900 


1,501.50 



252 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Lankhorst, Abraham $ 

Lankhorst, Beverly P. 

Larrabee, Leonard C. & Peggy S. 

Larson, John B. & Mafalda M. 

Larson, Robert C. & Betty F. 

Laverty, Charles & Lillian L. 

Lavine, Jerome M. & Mary C. 

Lavrakas, Fofo 

Law, John H. & Nancy F. 

Lawrence, David B. & Priscilla M. 

Lawrence, Lincoln C. & Blanche P. 

Lawson, Harold E. 

Lawson, Harold E. & Wanda E. 

Leathern, Ernest F. & Evelyn K. 

Leathern, Evelyn K. 

Leaver, Robert 0. & Barbara S. 

Leavitt, Donald P. & Christine P. 

Lee, Paul H. & Frances Sue 

Lee, Shih Ying & May C. 

Leger, Mary E. , Trustee, L & L 

Realty Trust 
Lemander, William C. & Emily K. 
LeMann, John 

Lemire, Robert A. & Virginia Mae 
Lenington, Robert L. & Carolyn J. 
Lennon, James V. & El in 
Leslie, Maurice A. 
Leslie, Maurice A. & Annie 
Leslie, Paul M. & Elizabeth M. 
Levin, Alvin 
Levin, Alvin & Betty 
Li, Yao T. & Nancy T. 
Liddick, Harold S. & Virginia D. 
Liepins, Atis A. & Diana 
Light, Galen D. , Jr. & Lois M. 
Lightbody, John W. , Sr. & 

Muriel G. 
Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 
Lincoln Development Corporation 
Lincoln, John W. & Clarinda Y. 
Lincoln Old Town Hall Corporation 
Lincoln Plumbing & Heating Co. 
Lindsay, Franklin A. 
Lindsay, Franklin A. & Margot C. 
Lingo s, John G. , Stamatia & 

George 
Linstrom, Peter J. & Maybelle L. 



170 



1,350 



320 



1,020 



750 
170 



26,200 
25,700 
23,800 
29,500 
49,300 
29,700 
12,900 
18,900 
24,800 
18,800 

30,900 
102,500 

1,600 
36,400 
23,500 

2,800 
43,600 

20,600 
41,700 
13,900 
16,200 
26,200 
24,500 
200 
18,400 
15,700 

8,800 
50,900 
24,300 
30,900 
28,100 

33,100 

32,400 
18,300 
10,700 



67,200 

35,400 
22,300 



5.95 

917.00 

899.50 

833.00 

1,032.50 

1,725.50 

1,039.50 

451 

661 

868.00 

658.00 

47.25 

1,081 

3,587, 

56.00 

1,274.00 

822.50 

98.00 

1,526.00 



50 
50 



50 
50 



50 
00 



721.00 
1,459.50 

486.50 

567.00 

917.00 

857 
7 

644.00 

549.50 
11.20 

308.00 
1,781.50 

850.50 
1,081.50 

983.50 

1,158.50 

35.70 

1,134.00 

640.50 

374.50 

26.25 

5.95 

2,352.00 

.1,239.00 
780.50 



253 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Linway Realty Trust 

Litte, Rudolph 

Little, John D. C. & Elizabeth 

Livengood, Eleanor C. H. 

Llanover Trust 

Lo, Steven S. T. & Yi-Chao M. 

Lockwood, Dunbar, Jr. & Irene I 

Loesel, Robert A. & Marybell 

Loewenstein, Paul & Sophie 

Long, Dorothy S. 

Long, L. Bruce & Mary Louise 

Loud, John F. & Mary L. 

Loveys, Harriet E. , Adm. 

Lovins, Gerald H. & Miriam 

Lummus, John W. & Ann A. 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand 

Lutnicki, Victor A. & Harriet H. 

Lynch, Edward H. & Madeline M. 

Lyon, Ruth 

Lyons, John F. 

MacFarland, Charles C. & 

Phyllis M. 
Maclnnis, Daniel A., Jr. <& 

Frances M. 
Maclnnis, Shirley A. 
Mackenzie, Roland C. & Ethel L, 
Mackie, Walter G. & Mary Ann 
Maclaurin, Elfriede 
Maclaurin, Ellen 
MacLean, H. Arnold & Corinne C. 
MacLeod, Edward & Hester M. 
MacLeod, Edward, Jr. & Mary M. 
Mahan, Russell P. & Anastasia 
Maher, Raymond Jay & Adeline 
Maher, Raymond P. (Est. of) & 

Gertrude M. 
Mahoney Brothers, Inc. 
Mahoney, Gerald J. & Jeanne M. 
Maier, Emanuel & Sylvia 
Mallett, Herbert A. & Eva M. 
Malloy, Robert M. 
Malloy, Robert M. & Irene C. 
Malloy, Robert M. , Jr. & Carol 
Manna rino, Joseph & Florence A. 
Manning, Catherine L. 
Manzelli, John & Dorothy 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 100 


$ 3.50 




34,700 


1,214.50 




31,900 


1,116.50 




17,900 


626.50 




21,500 


752.50 




21,200 


742.00 




55,500 


1,942.50 




16,200 


567.00 




33,500 


1,172.50 




20,400 


714.00 




39,400 


1,379.00 




49,500 


1,732.50 




27,600 


966.00 




19,500 


682.50 




31,900 


1,116.50 




29,300 


1,025.50 


. 


52,400 


1,834.00 




17,000 


595.00 




16,200 


567.00 


4,700 




164.50 




20,200 


707.00 




18,900 


661.50 




3,800 


133.00 




46,500 


1,627.50 




13,000 


455.00 




46,800 


1,638.00 




34,400 


1,204.00 




25,800 


903.00 




17,200 


602.00 




10,000 


350.00 




53,100 


1,858.50 




18,800 


658.00 




15,300 


535.50 


1,120 




39.20 




23,900 


836.50 




41,800 


1,463.00 




15,900 


556.50 


1,300 


79,500 


2,828.00 




56,300 


1,970.50 


E. 


22,000 


770.00 




15,500 


542.50 




16,700 


584.50 




19,900 


696.50 



254 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Mar, James W. & Edith 
Marchetti, John W. & Sarah G. 
Maroni, Jacques R. 
Marsh, Paul E. & Margaret B. 
Martin, Robert T. & Margaret M. 
Martin, Spencer F. , Jr. & 

Caroline F. 
Martini, William F. & Virginia i 
Marvin ' s Foreign Auto 
Mascari, Leonard E. & Grace B. 
Maselli, Aldo G. & F. Claire 
Mason, Hayden & Jean C. 
Mason, Max, Jr. & Betty M. 
Mason, Richard K. & Ann E. 
Mason, William C. ft Virginia 
Maxwell, Ralph E. & Phyllis B. 
Mayfield, Glover B. & Gale S. 
Maynide, Inc. 
McCausland, Gordon C. & 

Elizabeth C. 
McClennen, Alan & Louise H. 
McColl, Archibald 
McConnon, George J. & Esther G. 
McCune, William J. & Elizabeth 
McEnness, Harold F. 
McGrath, James F. & Mary F. 
McHugh, Mary F. 
McKennan, William & Alice W. 
McKhann, Margaret L. 
McKnight, David B. & Eleanor J. 
McKnight, David B. & Ernest T. 
McKnight, Wilmot & Katherine E. 
McLean, John L. & Ann A. 
McLellan, John W. & Julia C. 
McLeod, James & Ethel B. 
McMurtry, George C. & Rose Mary 
McNamee, John F. , III, & 

Jacqueline B. 
McNulty, Thomas F. & Mary S. 
McWalter, Robert E. 
Mead, Varnum R. & Janice H. 
Meade, Edmund J. & Eleanor H. 
Melanson, Leonard J. & Mary 
Meriam, Philip W. & Ellin F. 
Meriam, Richard S. & Alice G. 
Merrill, Henry M. , Jr. & 

Priscilla 0. 
Merrill, Vincent N. & Anne S. 



850 



200 



28,200 
29,200 
46,000 
42,900 
29,800 

25,000 
29,500 

4,100 
31,000 
21,300 
24,400 
16,800 
14,000 
39,900 
42,600 
248,000 

27,600 
58,500 

18,600 
51,400 

5,700 
34,500 
51,200 
38,600 
49,500 
19,700 

4,700 
18,400 
18,500 
14,300 

9,300 
25,000 

18,100 
65,100 
2,800 
23,100 
13,800 
15,800 
23,900 
50,400 

28,200 
24,900 



987.00 
1,022.00 
1,610.00 
1,501.50 
1,043.00 

875.00 

1,032.50 

29.75 

143.50 

1,085.00 

745.50 

854.00 

588.00 

490.00 

1,396.50 

1,491.00 

8,680.00 

966.00 

2,047.50 

7.00 

651.00 

1,799.00 

199.50 

1,207.50 

1,792.00 

1,351.00 

1,732.50 

689.50 

164.50 

644.00 

647.50 

500.50 

325.50 

875.00 

633.50 

2,278.50 

98.00 

808.50 

483.00 

553.00 

836.50 

1,764.00 

987.00 
871.50 



255 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Messina, Diego R. & Elena C. $ 
Messina, Jaspare & Grazia 
Meyer, James W. 340 

Meyer, James W. & Carol H. 
Meyer, Robert V. & Eugenie S. 
Militzer, Raymond E. & Martha B. 
Millar, Philip & Winifred M. 
Millard, Donald A. & Jeannette D. 
Millard, Donald A. 170 

Miller, Joseph F. G. & Paula A. L. 
Mills, Cecil R. & 
Mintz, Norbett L. 
& 

Sc 
Sc 



G. & Paula A. 

Lillian M. 

& Sophie B. 
Josephine L. 
Helen 
Isabel 



& Josephine 
Joan R. 
Trustee, 



Dorothy H. 
& Gertrude C. 



Miser, Hugh J. 
Mix, Thomas R. 
Mixon, Scott I 
Monks, Ann S. 
Moody, Charles P 
Moor, Edgar J. & 
Moore, John E. 

Emerson Realty Trust 
Moore, Laurence & Eleanor 
Moore, Murvale H. , Jr. & 

NeGarre Heshmut 
Moore, Paul 
Moore, Robert L. & 
Morette, Walter J. 
Morey, Kenneth & Ruth I. 
Morgan, Henry M. & Gwen G. 
Morgan, Richard S. 
Morgan, Richard S. & Molly H. 
Morris, Milliage E. 
Morris, Robert E. F 

Clara D. 
Morris, Robert H. & 
Morrissey, J. Neil 
Morrissey, J. Neil & Mary F. 
Morse, Thomas R. 
Morse, William H. 
Morse, William H. & Marguerite 
Morse, William H. & Patricia A. 
Moss, Leonard G. & Frances S. 
Moss, Richard W. & Barbara B. 
Mount, Wayne D. & Claire L. 
Mukhitarian, Samuel & Stephanie 
Murphy, Cyrus W. & Per sis S. 
Murphy, Daniel J. & Louise C. 
Murphy, Edward W. 
Murphy, Mary B. 



& Beatrice 


M 


(Est. 


of) 


& 


Irene 


S. 





300 



100 



340 



6,000 


$ 210.00 


22,900 


801.50 




11.90 


30,600 


1,071.00 


33,200 


1,162.00 


64,300 


2,250.50 


13,600 


476.00 


59,200 


2,072.00 




5.95 


30,900 


1,081.50 


18,200 


637.00 


3,800 


133.00 


50,900 


1,781.50 


25,200 


882.00 


29,900 


1,046.50 


190,300 


6,660.50 


27,800 


973.00 


47,600 


1,666.00 


147,800 


5,173.00 


58,300 


2,040.50 


29,300 


1,025.50 


100 


3.50 


26,500 


927.50 


23,000 


805.00 


16,800 


588.00 


43,000 


1,505.00 




10.50 


30,700 


1,074.50 


10,600 


371.00 


16,000 


560.00 


17,700 


619.50 




3.50 


17,800 


623.00 


38,100 


1,333.50 




11.90 


19,400 


679.00 


24,400 


854.00 


25,800 


903.00 


28,000 


980.00 


29,000 


1,015.00 


18,400 


644.00 


20,700 


724.50 


16,400 


574.00 


28,100 


983.50 


21,200 


742.00 



256 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 




Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


Murphy, Mina Dorothea 


$ 


$ 16,800 


$ 588.00 


Murphy, William F. & Ruth M. 




46,500 


1,627.50 


Myles, Theresa Anne & J. Richard 


35,600 


1,246.00 


Naiman, Mark L. & Adeline L. 




21,600 


756.00 


Napoli, Joseph J. 




40,000 


1,400.00 


Natoli, Donald J. & Lois M. 




25,100 


878.50 


Nathan, Nigel H. & Luella A. 




8,400 


294.00 


Navon, David H. & Roberta 




41,800 


1,463.00 


Neely, Scott & Joan H. 




26,700 


934.50 


Neiley, Alexander H. & Diana B. 




30,100 


1,053.50 


Nelson, Albert E. & Marjorie E. 




27,500 


962.50 


Nelson, Duncan M. 


100 




3.50 


Nelson, Duncan M. & Jean R. 




38,400 


1,344.00 


Nelson, Erik J. & Dorothy G. 




19,300 


675.50 


Nelson, W. Newton & Eleanor R. 




43,900 


1,536.50 


Nesto, Bruno R. & Eugenia R. 




32,900 


1,151.50 


Neumann, Ernest P. (Est. of ) & 






Sylvia B. 




42,700 


1,494.50 


Neville, James 


100 




3.50 


Neville, James M. & Marjorie J. 




16,900 


591.50 


Newbold, Thomas 




43,900 


1,536.50 


Newell, Lena M. 




20,800 


728.00 


New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 


266,100 




9,313.50 


Newman, Philip & Elsa L. 




33,900 


1,186.50 


Newton, George C., Jr. 


170 




5.95 


Newton, George C., Jr. & 








Elizabeth E. 




33,800 


1,183.00 


Newton, Harland B. , Executor 




24,700 


864.50 


Newton, Harland B. & Ethel A. 




29,300 


1,025.50 


Newton, Hazel H. 




19,500 


682.50 


Nichols, Walter & Ethel D. 




19,800 


693.00 


Niles, John B. & Muriel L. 




18,800 


658.00 


Niles, Robert L. & Virginia M. 




27,600 


966.00 


Norton, Paul L. 




7,800 


273.00 


Norton, Paul L. & Margaret 




33,100 


1,158.50 


Novak, Kalman & Nellie R. 




32,900 


1,151.50 


Nystrom, Foster H. & Edna C. 




21,000 


735.00 


O'Brien, Daniel F. & Mary T. 




18,500 


647.50 


O'Brien, John H. 




16,700 


584.50 


O'Brien, John H. & Barbara M. 




33,000 


1,155.00 


Ogden, David D. & Joan A. 




50,900 


1,781.50 


Old County Realty Trust 




12,400 


434.00 


O'Leary, Paul J. & Alyce M. 




34,500 


1,207.50 


Olivieri, James & Dorothy M. 




17,200 


602.00 


Olivo, Jean E. 




1,800 


63.00 



257 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Real and 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 79,800 


$ 2,793.00 


53,400 


1,869.00 


20,300 


710.50 


35,800 


1,253.00 


17,400 


609.00 




280.00 


96,900 


3,391.50 


40,500 


1,417.50 


26,700 


934.50 


18,900 


661.50 


21,900 


766.50 


25,600 


896.00 


29,500 


1,032.50 


24,300 


850.50 


41,300 


1,445.50 


23,200 


812.00 


18,400 


644.00 


24,500 


857.50 


300 


10.50 


33,300 


1,165.50 


18,900 


661.50 


28,300 


990.50 


3,100 


108.50 


29,500 


1,032.50 


18,900 


661.50 


25,800 


903.00 


15,700 


549.50 


4,100 


143.50 


2,700 


94.50 


29,200 


1,022.00 


26,400 


924.00 


37,300 


1,305.50 


29,500 


1,032.50 


23,300 


815.50 


23,900 


836.50 


5,200 


182.00 


28,400 


994.00 


4,000 


140.00 


28,500 


997.50 


71,600 


2,506.00 


21,100 


738.50 


22,300 


661.50 


53,700 


1,879.50 




11.90 


18,900 


661.50 



Olmsted, Harriet A. $ 

Olsen, Kenneth H. & Elva-Liisa 

Olsen, Ralph & Marcia E. 

O'Neill, Edward J. & Teresa 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. & Camilla M. 

Osborne, Gordon 8,000 

Osborne, Gordon & Freda W. 

Ouroussoff, Vladimir & Renata 

Outten, Henry P. & Nancy K. 

Owen, Carleton W. 

Owen, Charles J. & Mary Lee 

Paddock, Louis E. & Ann E. 
Page, Elizabeth J. 
Page, Elliott F. & Emily R. 
Page, Lot B. & Patricia H. 
Page, Milton S. & Roberta M. 
Page, Stanley W. & Elisabeth H. 
Paige, Richard B. & Elizabeth 
Paine, Albert S. & Noelle W. 
Paino, Dolores M. 
Palmer, Attelio A. & Kathryne 
Palmer, Eleanor M. 
Panetta, Frank & James 
Panetta, Frank & Theresa J. 
Panetta, James J. & Rosemary D. 
Panetta, Pasquale & Mary 
Panetta, Salvatore & Rita 
Paone, Mary T. 
Paquette, Margaret 
Parish, Edward C, Jr. & Joan 
Parker, Jackson B. & Jacqueline 
Parsons, W. Chester ^ Claire T. 
Pastoriza, James J. & Ruth B. 
Patten, Warren & Judith E. 
Pattinson, Mary I. 
Pavlo, Jessie 

Payne, Roger S. & Katherine B. 
Payne, William T. & Mary H. 
Pearmain, W. Robert & Claire P. 
Peavy, Leopold, Jr. & Elizabeth 
Peck, Will V. & Mildred E. 
Peirce, Isabel T. 
Pertzoff, Alexander C. & 

Elizabeth B. 
Pertzoff, Constantin A. 340 

Peloquin, Roy J. & Alice M. 



258 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Mary E. 
Phyllis L, 



& Charlotte T. 



Pertzoff, Constantin A. & Olga $ 

Pertzoff, Olga 

Peterson, Frank W. & 

Petritis, Peter N. & 

Pettit, Kathreen N. 

Phillips, Henry B 

Phinney, Jean R. 

Pickman, Anthony 

Pickman, Anthony & Alice L. 

Pierce, Charles Eliot & Dora R. 

Pike, John A. & Mary S. 

Pino, Frank J. & Muriel E. 

Plant, Paul R. & Madeline L. 

Podsen, Robert E. & Doris A. 

Polumbaum, Theodore S. & Nyna 

Porter, Stanley D. & Josephine 

Postel, Sholem & Marie L. 

Poulos, Charles L. & Sophie 

Powers, Clara E. 

Powers, Francis L., Jr. & Helen 

Pratt, Nancy A. 

Preston, Jean W. 

Primak, Lena 

Primak, John & Lena 

Ouarton, Gardner & Frances 

Radasch, Donald & Margaret R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. & Ruth M. 

Raja, Roy M. & Ellen A. 

Raker, Morris & Anne M. 

Rand, Lucy Kimball 

Rand, William M. & Priscilla W. 

Rando, Thomas 

Rapperport, Eugene J. & Lucy H. 

Rappoli, Arthur E. & Dorothy H. 

Rawson, Edward B. & Nancy B. 

Reece, Richard C. & Susan W. 

Rego, Manuel J. & Catherine 

Reservoir Nursing Home, Inc. 

Rhodes, Timothy & Janet 

Ricci, Louis, Fred & Charles 

Rice, Arthur W. , Jr. & Pauline K. 

Rice, James F. , Jr. & Barbara A. 

Rich, Howard L. , Jr. & Ruth R. 

Richardson, Frederick C. 



340 



141,800 
148,800 
27,500 
47,800 
25,100 
64,400 
32,300 

69,300 
46,600 
27,200 
20,300 
31,700 
52,800 
33,900 
32,800 
19,300 
30,800 
26,400 
15,400 
2,500 
76,100 
12,100 
41,200 

64,300 

23,500 
2,900 
22,900 
18,200 
43,800 
61,500 
31,700 
29,100 
28,500 
29,700 
30,700 
38,400 
22,100 
100 
23,500 
10,700 
58,200 
19,900 
54,100 
25,700 



$4,963.00 
5,208.00 

962.50 
1,673.00 

878.50 
2,254.00 
1,130.50 
11.90 
2,425.50 
1,631.00 

952.00 

710.50 
1,109.50 
1,848.00 
1,186.50 
1,148.00 

675.50 
1,078.00 

924.00 

539.00 

87.50 

2,663.50 

423.50 
1,442.00 

2,250.50 

822.50 

101.50 

801.50 

637.00 

1,533.00 

2,152.50 

1,109.50 

1,018.50 

997.50 

1,039.50 

1,074.50 

1,344.00 

773.50 

3.50 

822.50 

374.50 

2,037.00 

696.50 

1,893.50 

899.50 



259 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Richardson, John A. W. & Anna 

Richardson, Lyle 

Riley, Allston & Marion H. 

Risch, Martin D. & Joan C. 

Robbins, Roland W. & Geraldine 

Robey, A. Alexander & Harriet S. 

Robichaud, George U. & Emma 

Robinson, Dora A. 

Rodimon, Mildred M. 

Rodrick, William D. & Alice E. 

Roehr, George L. & Marcia A. 

Rogers, Alfred P. 

Rogers, Alfred P. & George E. , 

Trustees 
Rogers, David F. 
Rogers, David F. & Harriet J. 
Rogers, Mabelle, Winifred & 

Evelyn 
Rolfe, Edward & Stephanie 
Rollins, Barbara 
Rollins, J. Leslie & Barbara 
Rollins, Oliver W. & Hala P. 
Rood, Allan & Jane 
Rooney, Edward D. & Elizabeth M. 
Rosane, Richard C. & Marjorie B. 
Rose, James & Glenys W. 
Rosenwald, Harold & Betty Booth 
Ross, Paul F. & Rita M. 
Ross, Thorvald S., Jr. & 

Margaret P. 
Ross, William C. 
Rossoni, John P. 
Rouner, Thomas J. 
Row, Ronald V. & 
Rowe, Lawrence L. 
Rowe, Standi sh S. 
Roy, Nancy C. 
Rubissow, George 
Rugo, Henry J. & 
Ruocco, Ralph J. 
Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln 
Russell, James D. & Marguerite 
Russell, Thomas R. & Effie B. 
Russes, Richard P. & Mary D. 
Ryan, Alice E. , Conservator 
Ryan, Frank A. 
Ryan, James J. & Helen 



& Marian L. 
& Paola M. 

& Doris J. 
Jane E. 

& Mildred M, 



J. & Marion J, 

Faith W. 

A. & Isabel I. 



33,200 
37,900 
42,900 
19,100 
16,800 
57,600 
22,600 
16,000 
16,700 
22,100 
78,100 
49,200 

16,800 

600 

26,900 

38,600 
29,800 
500 
31,800 
22,900 
20,600 
17,500 
33,700 
26,300 
55,500 
30,500 

36,400 
32,200 
45,300 

7,000 
35,300 

5,600 
41,600 
16,500 
28,100 
48,000 
26,300 
24,000 
23,800 
33,200 
10,400 
25,200 

1,100 
21,300 



1,162.00 

1,326.50 

1,501.50 

668.50 

588.00 

2,016.00 

791.00 

560.00 

584.50 

773.50 

2,733.50 

1,722.00 

588.00 

21.00 

941.50 

1,351.00 

1,043.00 

' 17.50 

1,113.00 

801.50 

721.00 

612.50 

1,179.50 

920.50 

1,942.50 

1,067.50 

1,274.00 

1,127.00 

1,585.50 
245.00 

1,235.50 
196.00 

1,456.00 
577.50 
983.50 

1,680.00 
920.50 
840.00 
833.00 

1,162.00 

364.00 

882.00 

38.50 

745.50 



260 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1. 1966 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


Ryan, Lawrence $ 


$ 13,300 


$ 465.50 


Ryan, Mary A. 


13,000 


455.00 


Ryan, William H. & Mary B. 


9,100 


318.50 


Ryer, Russell E. & Margaret C. 


28,000 


980.00 


Rymer, William W. & Louise D. 


35,100 


1,228.50 


Sabbag, Arthur & Evelyn J. 


18,100 


633.50 


Sagendorph, Estate of Jane H. 


59,100 


2,068.50 


Salmon, Walter J. & Marjorie B. 


33,400 


1,169.00 


Sampson, Coleman W. & Phyllis E. 


22,300 


780.50 


Sanderson, George A. (Est. of) 






& Priscilla R. 


54,300 


1,900.50 


Sandy Pond Trust 


116,000 


4,060.00 


Sartori, Louis R. & Ruth M. 


38,400 


1,344.00 


Satterfield, Charles N. & Anne 


35,600 


1,246.00 


Saul, Robert E. & Madeline L. 


23,500 


822.50 


Saunders, Philip, Jr. & 






Virginia L. 


31,000 


1,085.00 


Sawtell, Clement C. & Adelaide 


33,500 


1,172.50 


Sayre, Woodrow W. 


4,900 


171.50 


Schaal, Albert A. & Zelpha M. 


400 


14.00 


Scheuer, Harry & Catherine N. 


32,900 


1,151.50 


Scholz, Mary A. 


48,200 


1,687.00 


Schumacher, August & Mary L. 


12,800 


448.00 


Schwann, William & Aire-Maija 


40,700 


1,424.50 


Scott, Anne 


38,700 


1,354.50 


Scott, Hermon H. 


24,500 


857.50 


Secora, Julia 


9,300 


325.50 


Sedgwick, Harold Bend 


35,900 


1,256.50 


Seeckts, Ehlert W. 


28,000 


980.00 


Seeckts, Ehlert W. & Eleanor R. 


33,800 


1,183.00 


Selfridge, Oliver G. & Allison 


30,800 


1,078.00 


Senders, John W. & Virginia L. 


34,000 


1,190.00 


Sexton, Maurice J. 


18,800 


658.00 


Shambaugh, Joan D. 


26,200 


917.00 


Shansky, David & Nettie 


30,400 


1,064.00 


Shapiro, David & Esther 


28,500 


997.50 


Sharpe, William 340 




11.90 


Sharpe, William, Jr. & Elaine 


45,300 


1,585.50 


Shaw, Alice DeS. 


83,800 


2,933.00 


Shea, William J. & Margaret T. 


21,100 


738.50 


Shepard, Gardner D. & Mary M. 


37,000 


1,295.00 


Sherman, Daniel E. , Jr. & Sadie 


25,800 


903.00 


Sherman, Matthew N. & Diane F. 


21,700 


759.50 


Sherwin, Estate of Edward V. 


6,400 


224.00 


Shomphe, Estate of Patrick W. 






& Annie B. 


34,400 


1,204.00 



261 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



& Lucille J. 
Margaret J. 
J. 

Lillian M. 
Barbara B. 
, 2nd, & 

Florence C. 
& Margaret L. 
& Elizabeth H. 



Shurling, Watson & Emily I. 
Siler, William C. & Barbara 
Silva, Mary E. 
Silva, Walter J. 
Simms, Hugh P. & 
Simonds, Anthony 
Simonds, Lena J. 
Simourian, John & 
Sis son, John H. & 
Slayter, Henry S., 

Elizabeth M. 
Smith, Carl D. & 
Smith, C. DeWitt 
Smith, Harold D. 
Smith, John E. , Trustee, 

Sherman Realty Trust 
Smith, Sumner 

Smith, William J. & Barbara J. 
Smulowicz, Bronislaw & Sawera 
Smyth, Robert R. & Adella C. 
Snelling, Charles A. 
Snelling, Dorothy R. 
Snelling, Howard & Elizabeth J. 
Snelling, Jessica 
Snelling, John Rudolf 
Snelling, Norman J. & Carolyn R. 
Snider, Greta W. 
Sorenson, Heirs of Hans 
Southack, Theodore L. , Jr. & 

Marion B. 
Southard, Garrison A., Jr. & 

Floryse M. 
Spaeth 4 Daniel A. & Margaret A. 
Spangle, Clarence W. & Virginia 
Spence, Robert A. & Helen M. 
Spencer, Henry W. & Marguerite 
Spindler, Cecil J. , Trustee, 

Mary S. Gordon R. E. Trust 
Spock, Michael & Judith W. 
Spooner, Frederick C. & Sarah W, 
Spooner, Lily T. 

Springborn, Robert C. & Carolyn 
Stankard, Charles E. , Jr. & 

Jean Catharine 
St. Anne's Church, Parish of 
Stebbins, Herbert A., Jr. & 

Patricia R. 



9,400 
23,500 
79,400 
23,100 
18,300 
18,800 

1,900 
42,600 
48,400 

24,200 
22,400 
68,000 
18,800 



16, 

120, 

11/ 

32, 

30, 

17, 

15, 

20, 

15, 

4, 

16, 

7, 

8, 



900 
600 
400 
200 
000 
500 
500 
500 
400 
700 
700 
100 
400 



49,500 

47,000 
29,900 
44,000 
26,800 
55,100 

49,500 
26;400 
15,300 
19,200 
5,700 

15,200 
20,000 

21,600 



50 
50 



329.00 

822.50 

2,779.00 

808.50 

640.50 

658.00 

66.50 

1,491.00 

1,694.00 

847.00 

784.00 

2,380.00 

658.00 

591.50 

4,221.00 

399.00 

1,127.00 

1,050.00 

612.50 

542 

717 

539.00 

164.50 

584.50 

248.50 

294.00 

1,732.50 

1,645.00 
1,046.50 
1,540.00 
938.00 
1,928.50 

1,732.50 
924.00 
535.50 
672.00 
199.50 

532.00 
700.00 

756.00 



262 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Stevens, Charles H. & Patricia $ $ 42,000 

Stevens, Frank R. & Katherine L. 43,200 

Stevens, Kimball C. & Eleanor G. 32,500 

Stevens, Samuel A. C. & Ellen A. 28,800 

Stevenson, John P. & Patricia A. 36,900 

Stewart, Francis J., Jr. & Ruth 29,600 

Stires, Ernest M. & Iva O. 16,200 

Stockellburg, Arthur A. 8,300 

Stoudt, Howard W. & Jean H. 16,500 

St. Pierre, Gertrude 17,100 

Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 17,000 

Street, Earle B. & Janet H. 17,600 

Striker, William W. & Marjorie 20,100 

Sturgis, Alanson H. , Jr. & Anne 20,200 

Sullivan, Gladys G. 17,000 

Summers, Richard B. & Winifred 20,500 

Swan, Edmund & Eleanor G. 19,400 

Swanson, Alfred & Evelyn Aiken 25,100 

Swanson, Arthur H. & Helen K. 25,000 
Swanson Pontiac, Inc. 1,500 

Swartz, Eli & Jeanette U. 17,500 

Sweeney, Joseph E. & Jeanne M. 21,700 

Swiedler Building Corporation 29,600 

Swift, Orlando B. fk Janice B. 33,600 

Swift, William N. & Phyllis C. 28,800 

Swinconeck, John J. & Sophie 10,800 

Sykes, David F. & Margaret P. 29,600 

Sylvia, Lawrence M. & Barbara L. 27,300 

Taillacq, Elsie A. C. 18,200 

Tarbell, George G. , Trustee 74,500 
Tarbell, George G. , Jr. & 

Dorothy C. 26,700 

Tarky, Vincent T. 80,400 

Tarky, William J., Jr. 6,000 

Taschioglou, Kemon P. & Rhoda K. 25,100 

Taylor, Edward S. 47,700 

Taylor, Frederick B. & Lex H. 33,800 

Taylor, W. Royce & Dorothy V. 23,400 

Teabo, Prince C. & Elizabeth T. 15,400 

Tead, Eleanor K. 28,000 

Telling, Irving & Jane Cushman 31,300 

Tennessee Gas Transmission Co. 153,150 1,000 

Tetreault, Arthur H. & Anne G. 16, 300 

Tetreault, Arthur H. & Claire F. 21,400 

Tew, John B. 66,200 
Thiessen, Arthur E. 170 



$1,470.00 

1,512.00 

1,137.50 

1,008.00 

1,291.50 

1,036.00 

567.00 

290.50 

577.50 

598.50 

595.00 

616.00 

703.50 

707.00 

595.00 

717.50 

679.00 

878.50 

875.00 

52.50 

612.50 

759.50 

1,036.00 

1,176.00 

1,008.00 

378.00 

1,036.00 

955.50 

637.00 
2,607.50 

934.50 

2,814.00 

210.00 

878.50 

1,669.50 

1,183.00 

819.00 

539.00 

980.00 

1,095.50 

5,395.25 

570.50 

749.00 

2,317.00 

5.95 



263 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Thiessen, Arthur E. & Laura 
Thomas, Peter A. & Muriel M. 
Thompson, Donald J. 
Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr. & 

Arlene 
Thompson, Lawrence 
Thompson, Lawrence E. & 

Dorothy A. 
Thorpe, Margaret M. 
Tinder, Glenn & Gloria 
Tingey, William H. , Jr. & Ruth 
Tingley, Frederick M. & Dilla 
Titus, William A. & D. Marion 
Todd, C. Lee, Eveleth R. , 

David & John 
Todd, Mabel H. 
Toler, Louise C. 
Tonseth, Didrick L. & Phebe L 

Herbert L. & Lorraine 

Volta W. & Geneva DeF 

Elizabeth M. 

Robert J. 
Service Station 



To rode, 
Torrey, 
Tracey, 
Tracey, 
Tracey ' 
Troisi, 
Tunnel 1 
Turner, 
Turner, 
Turner, 
Tyler, 



Ferdinand L. & Mary G, 
, Raymond W. & Suzanne 

Charles F. & Winifred 

James R. & Mildred B. 

Vernon D. & Merrylees 
Ethel A. 



Tyler, Heirs of Watson 

Umbrello, Carmel V. 
Umbrello, Francis & Virginia 
U. S. Dynamics Realty Trust 

Valley Pond Realty Trust 

Vance, Jane K. 

Van Dorn, Walter G. & Joan S. 

Van Leer, Hans L. 

Van Leer, Hans L. & Mary K. 

Van Leer, R. Karl & Rachel D. 

Van Wart, Walter L. & Stepheni 

Venier, Ettore P. & Mary E. 

Vercollone, Edmund S. & Julia 

Vitale, Joseph A. & M.« Frances 

Wadsworth, Charles Y. & 
Virginia D. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 50,900 


$ 1,781.50 




20,100 


703.50 




44,800 


1,568.00 




28,300 


990.50 


100 




3.50 




42,300 


1,480.50 




38,900 


1,361.50 




38,900 


1,361.50 


L 


34,200 


1,197.00 




23,300 


815.50 




13,700 


479.50 




16,600 


581.00 




61,300 


2,145.50 




20,600 


721.00 




21,800 


763.00 


s. 


17,500 


612.50 




37,600 


1,3.16.00 




40,900 


1,431.50 




18,500 


647.50 


3,230 




113.05 




13,700 


479.50 




36,300 


1,270.50 




15,400 


539.00 




25,900 


906.50 




25,700 


899.50 




11,400 


399.00 




11,100 


388.50 




20,200 


707.00 




24,500 


857.50 




3,100 


108.50 




6,500 


227.50 




8,200 


287.00 




16,500 


577.50 




1,700 


59.50 




59,500 


2,082.50 




36,000 


1,260.00 


a 


20,100 


703.50 




58,000 


2,030.00 




23,300 


815.50 




29,000 


1,015.00 




76,000 


2,660.00 



264 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Waible, Wendell J. & Florence $ 

Walen, Roger S. 100 

Walen, Roger S. & Constance M. 

Wales, Andrew M. & Betty R. 

Wales, Isabel G. 

Wales, R. Langdon & Ruth W. 

Walker, Sidney A. 

Walter, Charlton M. & Rosly M. 

Walton, Frank E. & Julie 

Wang, An & Lorraine C. 

Ward, Thomas D. & Jane L. 

Ward, Walter B. & Sophie E. 

Ward, Walter B. , Jr. & Marie L. 

Warner, Henrietta S. 

Warner, John B. 100 

Warner, John Burton & Barbara K. 

Warren, Donald H. & Joan B. 

Watts Realty Corporation 

Waugh, John S. & Nancy C. 

Webb, Rosella 

Webster, David & Winifred W. 

Weckstein, Richard & Muriel 

Weiss, Alfred D. & Anne K. 

Welch, Vernon F. & Leatrice J. 

Weld, Richard S. 

Wells, George & Katherine W. 

Wes-Lex Corporation 

Westcott, Vernon C. & Mary Alice 

Western Union Tel. & Tel. Co. 2,100 

Whalen, William B. & Mary E. 

Whatley, Robert Boyd & Kay A. 

Wheeler, Jennie Noyes 

White, John R. & Gina R. 

White, Katharine S. & John W. 

White, Robert E. & Marion J. 

Wilbor, John S. & Dorothy B. 

Wiley, G. Arnold ft Helen P. 

Wilfert, Fred J. & Eleanor M. 

Wilfert, Walter A. & Eleanor A. 

Wilfert, Walter A. & Eleanor A., 

Fred J. & Eleanor M. 
Willemin, Julian V. & Jane A. 
Williams, Edwin L., Jr. & Ruth D. 
Williams, William G. & Jane C. 
Williamson, Elizabeth R. 
Willmann, Werner S. & Margaret M. 
Wilson, Elizabeth & Flaherty, 

Anthony J. 



27,900 

26,900 
33,200 
51,500 
36,900 
41,700 
48,300 
15,600 
50,900 
20,300 
18,700 
16,600 
47,100 

35,100 
62,400 
3,900 
39,800 
27,900 
24,300 
40,900 
49,200 
17,500 
22,100 
41,800 
20,000 
22,900 

16,200 
20,400 
5,400 
45,200 
56,300 
25,700 
31,500 
14,000 
20,500 
20,300 

400 
21,400 
32,500 
20,000 
15,500 
22,700 

24,400 



976.50 

3.50 

941.50 

1,162.00 

1,802.50 

1,291.50 

1,459.50 

1,690.50 

546.00 

1,781.50 

710.50 

654.50 

581.00 

1,648.50 

3.50 

1,228.50 

2,184.00 

136.50 

1,393.00 

976.50 

850.50 

1,431.50 

1,722.00 

612.50 

773.50 

1,463.00 

700.00 

801.50 

73.50 

567.00 

714.00 

189.00 

1,582.00 

1,970.50 

899.50 

1,102.50 

490.00 

717.50 

710.50 

14.00 
749.00 
1,137.50 
700.00 
542.50 
794.50 

854.00 



265 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Wilson, Louise H. 
Wilson, Montgomery S, 

& Mary Ann 
Wilson, Robert D. & Kathryn M. 
Winchell, Gordon D. 

Gordon D. & Enid M. 

Gordon D. , Guilbert S, 

P. & Love, 

Guilbert & 



Winchell, 
Winchell, 

Richard 
Winchell, 

Evelyn 
Winchell, 
Winchell, 



(Est. of! 



Dorothy W. 
Estate of 



& Amy Jane 



Guilbert S, 

Guilbert S. 
Winship, Lee C. & Joyce L. 
Win ship, Thomas 
Winship, Thomas & Elizabeth C. 
Wirsig, Stanley S. & Arlene B. 
Witherby, Thomas H. & Marianne 
Witherton, John R. & Emily A. 
Withey, Edward L. & Barbara H. 
Wollmar, Dick J. & Mary Lou 
Wood, Frank H. & 
Wood, George A. , 
Wood, James D. & 
Wood, 0. Chester 
Hilve V. 



Jeanne R. 
Jr. & Nancy S, 
Ruth E. 
(Est. of) & 



Wood, Ralph V. , 
Wood, Robert C, 
Wood, Robert M, 
Woodington, W. 



Jr. & Virginia S. 

& Margaret B. 

& June W. 
Gordon & Mary L. 
Woods, Henry A. *i Barbara R. 
Worsham, Jack L. & Charlotte A. 
Worthington, Thomas K. & 

Elizabeth C. 
Wright, Halor & Ruth Vaughn 
Wright, Vernon G. & Huberta 

Yagjian, Jacob & Inez 
Yeuell, Kay M. & Suzanne R. 
Yore, George P. 
Yore, George P. & Kathleen 
Yos, Jerrold M. & Ann B. 
Young, David B. & Cora S. 
Young, Edward L. 
Young, Lee A. & Jane C. 
Young, Niels 0. & Lucy J. 



2,170 



340 



340 



120 



5,200 

28,600 
27,400 

32,500 

40,200 

63,800 

18,700 
29,600 

57,100 
24,100 
50,600 
22,100 
26,300 
18,300 
25,700 
25,900 
19,800 

19,000 
5,400 
33,300 
34,000 
28,300 
24,900 
24,000 

25,400 
27,400 
54,400 

2,400 
38,300 

15,000 
28,400 
18,100 
16,100 
44,400 
49,700 



182.00 

1,001.00 

959.00 

75.95 

1,137.50 

1,407.00 

2,233.00 

11.90 

654.50 

1,036.00 
11.90 

1,998.50 
843.50 

1,771.00 
773.50 
920.50 
640.50 
899.50 
906.50 
693.00 

665.00 
189.00 
1,165.50 
1,190.00 
990.50 
871.50 
840.00 

889.00 

959.00 

1,904.00 

84.00 

1,340.50 

4.20 

525.00 

994.00 

633.50 

563.50 

1,554.00 

1,739.50 



266 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1966 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Zarella, Joseph S. & Lillian M. $ $ 2,700 $ 94.50 

Ziegler, Elmer H. & Hilda M. 20,600 721.00 

Zinck, Floyd A. & Elma W. 26,400 924.00 

Zuelke, Laurence W. & Nancy J. 18,100 633.50 



267 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Clement C. Sawtell 
William T. King 
Richard F. Schroeder 



DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1966 $ 109.76 

Interest income in 1966, net 964.23 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 9.06 

Northern Pacific RR bond matured 1,000.00 

Withdrawn from savings banks 1, 010.00 

$ 3,093.05 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, 

net income $ 961.23 

Safe deposit box rent 3.00 

Deposited in savings banks 115.00 

2000 Southern New England 5 3/4%, 

11/1/96 2,005.68 3,084.91 

Cash balance at December 31, 1966 $ 8.14 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1966 

First National Bank of Boston $ 8.14 

Cambridge Savings Bank 329.52 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 523.76 

1000 Western Maryland RR 4%, 10/1/69 1,004.83 

3000 Alabama Power 3 1/2% 1/1/72 2,949.80 

1000 Southern Rwy. Equip. Trust 4 1/4%, 10/15/72 989.19 

2000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8%, 11/15/73 1,982.00 

1000 American Tel. & Tel. 2 3/4%, 10/1/75 948.30 
3000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4%, 

1/15/79 3,037.91 

2000 U. S. Treasury 3 1/2%, 11/15/80 1,950.47 

3000 Southern Bell Tel. 4%, 10/1/83 3,039.50 

1000 Idaho Power 4 1/2%, 1/1/87 1,000.00 
2000 General Telephone of California 4 1/8%, 

3/1/88 2,016.04 

1000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8%, 2/15/88 1,010.40 

1000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5%, 6/1/89 1,004.18 

1000 Southern California Edison 4 1/2%, 2/15/90 1,004.67 

2000 Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4%, 11/1/96 2,005.68 

$ 24,804.39 



268 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1966 
Income received in 1966: 

Interest, net 

Annuity u/w Elsie Pierce 
Withdrawn from Savings Banks , net 

of deposits 
Interest applied to amortize 

bond premiums 



$ 6,609.02 
2,531.52 



$ 1,566.75 

9,140.54 

28,716.24 

15.56 
$ 39,439.09 



Payments per order of Selectmen: 

Hospital aid 

Well-Child Clinic 

Dental Clinic 

Chest X-Ray Clinic 

Care of Pierce Park grounds 

Skating rink 

Pierce House expense: 

Gas $1,261.80 

Electricity 141.62 

Repairs 347.64 

Safe deposit box rent 
Savings bank interest allowed 

to accumulate 
Bonds purchased: 

5000 U. S. Treasury 5 5/8% 2/15/68 

10,000 Ohio Power 5% 1/1/96 

5000 Southern New England Tel. 
5 3/4% 11/1/96 

10,000 Florida Power & Light 
6% 12/1/96 

Cash balance at December 31, 1966 



$ 1,636.91 
175.00 
100.00 
164.50 
942.48 
2,024.20 



1,751.06 
10.00 

369.75 

5,000.00 
9,975.00 

5,014.20 

10,262.50 



37,425.60 



$ 2,013.49 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1966 

Restricted Principal 

Warren Institution for Savings $ 376.60 

20,000 U. S. Treasury 4% 2/15/69 19,867.50 
10,000 Southern Pacific RR Equip. Trust 

4 1/4% 7/1/72 9,799.20 

20,000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8%, 11/15/73 19,805.00 

10,000 Federal Land Banks 4 3/8% 4/21/75 9,925.00 
10,000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/2%, 

2/1/82 9,975.00 

10,000 Ohio Power 5%, 1/1/96 9,975.00 
5,000 Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4%, 

11/1/96 5,014.20 

10,000 Florida Power & Light 6%, 12/1/96 10,262.50 

10,000 Pacific Gas & Electric 4 5/8%, 6/1/97 10., 000.00 

10,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/4%, 6/1/98 10,000.00 

$115,000.00 



269 



Unrestricted 

Warten Institution for Savings $ 262.50 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 2,740.64 

Provident Institution for Savings 4,066.98 

5000 U. S. Treasury 5 5/8%, 2/15/68 5,000.00 

3500 U. S. Treasury 3 7/8% 5/15/68 3,500.00 

4000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8%, 9/15/72 4,013.42 
2000 Southern Rwy. Equip. Trust 4 1/4%, 

10/15/72 1,978.39 

3000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8%, 11/15/73 2,973.00 

5000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/4%, 5/15/74 - 5,000.00 
4000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4%, 

1979 4,056.58 

4000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8%, 4/1/85 4,037.00 

1000 Virginia Electric & Power 4 1/8%, 1986 1,025.75 

3000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8%, 1986 2,913.75 

5000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8%, 1988 5,113.72 

First National Bank of Boston • 2,013.49 

$163,695.22 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1966 
Interest income in 1966 



26.64 
60.12 



86.76 



Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Cash balance at December 31, 1966 

Bank Balance at December 31, 1966 

First National Bank of Boston 
Concord Cooperative Bank 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



60.12 



26.64 



$ 


26.64 
1,453.12 


$ 


1,479.76 


$ 


244.76 
1,235.00 


$ 


1,479.76 



270 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1966 

Interest income in 1966 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 



Payments per order Bemis Lecture Fund 

Trustees : 

Jan. 28 Jan Kessler 

Nov. 18 Dr. Stanley A. Cain 

Printing, postage, addressing notices 

Safe deposit box rent 

Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1966 



$ 156.01 

1,383.08 

9.40 





$ 


1,548.49 


$200.00 

60.00 

200.88 

3.00 






95.02 




558.90 




$ 


989.59 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1966 

First National Bank of Boston 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

3000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8%, 9/15/72 

1000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8%, 11/15/73 

2000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/2%, 

12/1/7 3 
3000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8%, 4/1/85 
3000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8%, 5/1/86 
1000 Virginia Electric & Power 4 1/8%, 1986 
3000 Western Mass. Electric 4 3/8%, 4/1/87 
2000 Idaho Power 4 1/2%, 1/1/87 
1000 Idaho Power 4 3/4%, 11/15/87 
1000 Alabama Power 3 7/8%, 1/1/88 
3000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8%, 8/15/88 
1000 Southern California Edison 4 1/2%, 2/15/90 
3000 New England Power 4 5/8%, 11/1/91 
3000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Gen ' 1 4%, 

10/1/95 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 


989, 


.59 




625, 


.42 


2 


,295, 


.98 


2, 


,984, 


.25 




991, 


.00 


1, 


,993. 


.75 


3, 


,024. 


.07 


2 t 


,913. 


.75 


1, 


,025. 


.65 


3, 


,000. 


.00 


2 t 


,000. 


,00 


1, 


,011. 


,22 


1, 


,000. 


,00 


3, 


,095. 


,46 


1, 


004. 


,67 


3, 


,042. 


,85 


3, 


000. 


00 


$33, 


997. 


66 


$ 2, 


046. 


90 


31, 


950. 


76 


$33, 


997. 


66 



271 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1966 

Interest income in 1966, net $ 606.94 

Donations received in 1966: 

General appeal (123 donors) 1,851.00 

Lincoln Grange 25.00 

Lincoln 4-H Horse Club 100.00 

Lincoln School Association 100.00 

Lincoln Fire and Police Association 

(1965 and 1966) 200.00 

Additional in memory of Ernest P. 

Neumann 5.00 

July 4 parking fees 982.43 

Interest applied to amortize bond 
premiums 

Withdrawn from savings bank, net 



$ 5,439.85 



3,870.37 

.62 

8,942.42 

$18,253.26 



Payments per order of Scholarship Fund 
Trustees : 

Balance of 1965-1966 grants: 

Ursula M. Remmes, University of 
Massachusetts 

Diane E. Woods, Salem Hospital 
School of Nursing 

Marcia S. Wilson, Richmond 
Professional Institute 

Suzanne J. Fedock, Boston Con- 
servatory of Music 
First half of 1966-1967 grants: 

Marcia S. Wilson, Richmond 
Professional Institute 

Janet Chisholm, Northeastern 
University 

Sandra Durnan, Rivier College 

Janet Whalen, Burdett College 

Elizabeth Sturgis, Briarcliff 
College 

Barbara Gajewski, College of 
Notre Dame of Maryland 

Suzanne J. Fedock, Boston Con- 
servatory of Music 

Ana stasia C. Mahan, Georgetown 
University 
Printing, addressing and mailing 
appeal letters 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 
5000 Ohio Power 5%, 1/1/96 
6000 Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4% 

11/1/96 



$1,050.00 



2,500.00 



83.33 



$3,633.33 

213.28 
4,987.50 

6,017.04 



272 



3000 U. S. Treasury 5 5/8% 2/15/68 



Cash balance at December 31. 1966 



$ 3,000.00 



$ 17,851.15 
$ 402.11 



Cash and Securities at December 31/ 1966 

First National Bank of Boston $ 402.11 

Provident Institution for Savings 1,216.68 

3000 U. S. Treasury 5 5/8% 2/15/68 3,000.00 

1000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 994.75 

1000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5%, 6/1/89 1,004.18 

1000 Southern California Edison 4 1/2%, 2/15/90 1,004.67 

5000 Ohio Power 5% 1/1/96 4,987.50 

6000 Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 6,017.04 

$18,626.93 



Reserve for balance of 1966-1967 grants 
Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Fund 
General Fund 



$ 1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,520.00 

5,005.00 

10,101.93 

$ 18,626.93 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1966 
Interest income in 1966 



Aid to poor, per order of Selectmen 
Safe deposit box rent 
Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1966 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1966 

First National Bank of Boston 
Boston 50 Savings Bank 
2000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/4% 5/15/74 
1000 Southern Bell Tel. 4%, 1983 







$ 


37.98 








167.38 






$ 


205.36 


$ 


88.77 
3.00 








42.38 




134.15 



71.21 



$ 71.21 
1,097.33 
2,000.00 
1,000.00 

$ 4,168.54 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 2,943.49 

1,225.05 

$ 4,168.54 



273 



LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1966 
Income received in 1966, net: 

Julia A. Bemis Fund 

Codman Fund 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 

Edith B. Farrar Fund 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

John H. Pierce Fund 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

Lincoln Library Fund 
Donation from Mrs. Bradford Cannon, for 

DeNormandie Room 
Withdrawn from savings banks, net: 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

John H. Pierce Fund 

Lincoln Library Fund 



Payments per order of Library Trustees: 
for books - from Cannon donations 
- from trust fund income 
Maryalice Thoma, Librarian, Pierce 

Fund income 
Safe deposit box rent 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 
Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4%, 11/1/96, 
bought : 
1000 in George G. Tarbell Fund 
1000 in John H. Pierce Fund 
1000 in Lincoln Library Fund 



188.65 



30.43 
21.12 
21.80 
19.73 
21.31 
6.62 
46.31 
18.61 
82.88 
135.86 
52.29 
76.95 



533.91 





100.00 


$1,024.18 
1,005.00 
1,002.84 


3,032.02 
$ 3,854.58 


$ 105.72 
321.91 




46.31 
3.00 




292.49 




1,002.84 
1,002.84 
1,002.84 


3,777.95 



Cash balance at December 31, 1966 



76.63 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1966 



Julia A. Bemis Fund 
Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 



Accumulated 

Income 
on Deposit Principal Total 



$ 64.36 $ 684.05 



748.41 



Codman Fund 

Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 



44.67 



474.59 



519.26 



274 



Accumulated 
Income 
On Deposit 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 

Boston 5C Savings Bank $ 38.92 



Principal Total 



$ 500.00 $ 538.92 



Edith B. Farrar Fund 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 47.48 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 

Boston 5C Savings Bank 22.53 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 
Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 

John H. Pierce Fund 

1000 Southern New Eng. 5 3/4%, 

11/1/96 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 
First National Bank 

of Boston 



440.00 



500.00 



158.89 



487.48 



522.53 



158.89 



1,002.84 1,002.84 

109.57 109.57 

2.16 2.16 

$1,114.57 $1,114.57 



George Russell Fund 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 41.97 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

1000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8%, 

11/15/73 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 83.87 



415.74 



991.00 



457.71 



991.00 



939.00 1,022.87 
$1,930.00 $2,013.87 



George G. Tarbell Fund 

1000 Southern Bell Tel. 4%, 

1983 
1000 Western Mass. Elec. 

4 3/8%, 1987 

1000 Southern New Eng. Tel. 

5 3/4%, 11/1/96 
Warren Institution for 

Savings 87.99 



1,000.00 1,000.00 

1,000.00 1,000.00 

1,002.84 1,002.84 

135.54 223.53 

$3,138.38 $3,226.37 



C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. 
Wheeler Fund 

1000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8%, 

11/15/73 
Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 



26.58 



991.00 
244.46 



991.00 
271.04 



$1,235.46 $1,262.04 



275 



Lincoln Library Fund 

1000 Southern N. E. Tel 

5 3/4% 1996 
Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 



First National Bank of Boston 
Cannon gifts balance 
Other income 



Accumulated 
Income 
on Deposit 



220.60 



101.08 
( 24.45 ) 
$ 755.60 



Principal 



Total 



$ 1,002.84 $ 1,002.84 

675.37 895.97 
$ 1,678.21 $ 1,898.81 



101.08 
( 24.45) 



$ 12,269.89 $ 13,025.49 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 

Cash Account 

Savings bank interest in 1966, 
paid to Town of Lincoln 

Savings Bank Deposits at December 31, 1966 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Cambridge Savings Bank 



51.34 



$ 722.00 

495.52 

$ 1,217.52 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1966 

Interest income in 1966 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 



July 4 Celebration, per order of 
Commissioners of Trust Funds 
Safe deposit box rent 
Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1966 





$ 
$ 


89.19 

230.54 

1.52 

321.25 


$200.00 
3.00 






19.56 




222.56 




$ 


98.69 



276 



Cash and Securities at December 31/ 1966 

First National Bank of Boston 

Boston 5C Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

1000 Southern Rwy. Equip. Trust 4 1/4%, 

10/15/72 
1000 Southern Bell Tel. 4%, 10/1/83 
1000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 
1000 Virginia Electric & Power 4 1/8%, 10/1/86 
1000 Southern California Edison 4 1/2%, 

2/15/90 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 


98. 


.69 




97. 


,62 




384. 


.41 




989. 


.20 


1, 


000. 


.00 


1, 


000. 


.00 


1, 


,025. 


.65 


1. 


.004, 


.67 


$5, 


,600. 


.24 


$ 


402, 


.62 


5< 


,197, 


.62 


$5, 


,600, 


.24 



277 



1967 ANNUAL REPORT 




"Watercolor painting 
for the 1967 Town Report 
by Foster Nystrom. M 



CONTENTS 



Pa^e 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 5 

Town Clerk 16 

FINANCE 

Treasurer 27 

Town Accountant 33 

Collector of Taxes 60 

Board of Assessors 62 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Departments 65 

Civil Defense 69 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 71 

Board of Public Welfare 73 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 75 

Board of Appeals 77 

Water Commissioners 80 

Conservation Commission 83 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 84 
Inspectors of Building, Wiring 

& Plumbing 86 

Public Works Department 87 

Cemetery Commissioners 90 



Page 
LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Library Trustees 91 

Recreation Committee 97 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park 103 

Elementary Schools 109 

Regional High School 143 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 166 

Valuation List 172 

Trust Funds 201 



REPORT 
of the 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 
FOR THE YEAR 1967 




Lincoln, Massachusetts 



TOWN CALENDAR 

SELECTMEN — Every Monday of each month, 7:30 p.m., 

Town Hall, 259-8850. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE — First Monday of each month, 8:00 p.m., 

Superintendent's Office, 259-9400. 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS -- For appointments call Town Hall, 

259-8850. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS — Meetings by appointment. 

BOARD OF HEALTH -- Meetings by appointment; call Dr. Gordon 

Donaldson, 259-8192. 

BOARD OF APPEALS -- Third Thursday of each month; call Town 

Hall, 259-8850. 

PLANNING BOARD -- Second Wednesday of each month, 8:00 p.m. 

Town Hall, 259-8850. 

POPULATION -- 4,463 (1965 Census) 

TOWN AREA -- 14.56 square miles 

1967 TAX RATE — $37 per $1,000 valuation 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -- First Monday in March after the fifteenth 

March 18, 1968 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF 

TOWN OFFICERS -- Saturday following Town Meeting - 

March 23, 1968 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 

REGISTRATION -- Twelve months continuous residence in the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts prior to 
March 18, 1968, and six months continuous 
residence in the Town of Lincoln prior to 
March 18, 1968. 

TOWN OFFICES -- Open Monday through Friday 8:30 a. m. to 

5 p. m. Closed on Saturdays 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Russell L. Haden, Jr., Chairman 
Elliott V. Grabill 
Harold E. Lawson 



The year 1967 was one of continued excellent co-operation be- 
tween Town Boards and progress in a number of directions. Such 
progress only becomes apparent when one pauses to review the 
year as a whole. 

One milestone passed was the approval at Town Meeting and 
subsequent construction of the bicycle path along Lincoln Road. 
Through careful planning during many hours by the able committee, 
a path was created that has received many favorable comments. 
Happily, we can also report that costs to date and expected will 
be well within the appropriation of $41,500. During 1968, South 

Great Road (Route 117) from the intersection with Route 126 to 
Farnsworth's Corner will be rebuilt. As part of this project, 
one shoulder (on the south side) will be made wide enough to ac- 
comodate pedestrians and cyclists. Because of the density of 
the housing along this road, it will not be possible to make this 
"path" as rural in character as that on Lincoln Road. 

The new sanitary landfill on North Great Road (Route 2A) was 
put in operation in April. There have been some problems with 
equipment and operation that have been surmounted during the year. 
We now have a "dump" that is a credit to the Town and that com- 
plies with State regulations. 

The use of the Pierce House has been growing steadily. During 
1967, restrooms were provided in keeping with this public use by 
groups, and the downstairs refurbished with paint and wallpaper. 
A beginning was made in furnishing this lovely home with appro- 
priate rugs and furniture. Fees were set for private use by 
citizens of the Town, and the income from these fees will be used 



to continue the furnishing under the guidance of a committee of 
Mrs. Dorothy Jackson, Mrs. Margaret Flint and Mr. Richard Reece. 

One Town function held there was a tea for newcomers to the 
Town to introduce to them members of Town Government. The sec- 
ond such tea was held in January, 1968, and it is planned to re- 
peat annually. The character of the Town is changing as most of 
us realize, as the market price of housing in Lincoln continues 
to escalate. Yet all of us cherish small town atmosphere with 
its informality and friendliness. It is important that we in- 
volve our new residents in the activities of the Town so that they 
can be a part of its heritage and richness. 

The location of the new limited access Route 2 has not yet 
been officially announced, but we expect such announcement early 
in 1968. No date for beginning construction has been set 
either, although we guess that it should be approximately in the 
period 19 70-72. It should then be complete before the bi-cen- 
tennial of 1975-76. We must begin our own Town planning for 
this celebration soon in conjunction with our neighboring towns. 

Public safety was the concern of much of our thinking and 
deliberation in 1967. Traffic control was stepped up signifi- 
cantly, aided by the new radar device. This will require con- 
tinued, consistent vigilance in 1968 and subsequent years. 

Also of concern was the increasing number of housebreaks in 
Lincoln and surrounding towns. As a pattern of this activity be- 
gan to develop, we decided, in conjunction with Chief Algeo and 
the Finance Committee, to increase our patrolling from two cruis- 
ers to three. One man is to be added to the force in 1968 and 
extra electronic equipment will also be added, if investigation 
indicates it to be of value. However, it should be obvious that 
the police cannot be everywhere, and so our most important "first 
line of defense" will remain the eyes and ears of our citizens. 
Any suspicious car or person should be reported as soon as noted, 
and it will be checked out by the police. We would rather in- 
vestigate 99 false alarms in the hope that the hundredth call will 
be of value than have anyone hold back from calling in his or her 
suspicions. 

Much has been reported in the press of the impact of medicaid 
and medicare on the budgets of towns and cities in the state and 
in the nation. While there has been a slight increase in Lin- 
coln, the increase is not worrisome. On Mrs. Causer's retire- 



ment in September, we were fortunate to secure the services of 
Mr. Leo Jeghelian to serve as Welfare Agent. Mr. Jeghelian 
also serves as Welfare Director of the Nashoba Welfare District, 
made up of the towns of Acton, Bedford and Carlisle. We have 
applied to have Lincoln admitted to this District and will pre- 
sent this matter at the Annual Town Meeting. We also continue 
to endorse the use of tax incomes in support of the Walden Clinic, 
the services of which are now being expanded. 

Besides being Welfare Agent, Mrs. Causer served as Town 
Accountant and Clerk of the Selectmen. We were very fortunate 
that Mrs. Elizabeth Snelling agreed to take on the task of Clerk 
to the Selectmen in addition to her other duties with the Assess- 
ors and Planning Board. We also are pleased that Mrs. Lois 
Light could take on the duties of Town Accountant, thus com- 
pleting our Town Hall staff. 

One of the headaches of modern life is that of commuting. 
Mr. Henry Spencer represents Lincoln on the Advisory Board of the 
MBTA. As a necessary adjunct to commuting by train, we have 
expanded the parking areas at the railroad station and will ex- 
pand some more in 1968, landscaping these areas at the same time. 

We draw to your attention the "changing of the guard" at 
Hanscom, as General O'Neil was promoted and transferred to Cali- 
fornia. He is a very able man and has been a good friend of 
Lincoln. We look forward to knowing his successor, Major General 
J. B. Bestic. 

We also note that a union now represents the custodians at 
our schools. This will call for continual study on our part 
during 1968. 

Retiring in 1968, after serving the Town in elected office 
are Mr. James Jagger, who leaves the Regional School Committee 
after six years, Mr. Charles Stevens, who leaves the Lincoln 
School Committee after three years, and Dr. Pierre Dreyfus, who 
leaves the Board of Health after six years. The Town will miss 
their participation on these important committees. 

Mr. David Hopkins, after a brief but very promising stint as 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, left Lincoln for Minneapolis. 

In the "shape of things to come", we note that Mr. Lawrence 
Hallett retires from the Lincoln Police after 23 years in Septem- 



ber, 1968. We will miss his steadfastness and even-handed en- 
forcement of the law. We are glad that his son, Mr. Richard 
Hallett, preserves his tradition of service on the force. 

And you, good citizen, we wish you well as the Town pro- 
gresses in 1968. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Kenneth W. Bergen 



MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



William H. Davis 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
Russell L. Haden, Jr. , Chairman 
Elliott V. Grabill 
Harold E. Lawson 



Frederick B. Taylor 



TOWN TREASURER 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 
Frank R. Stevens 
John B. French 



Frederick B. Taylor 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Charles H. Stevens, Chairman 
Margaret Marsh 
John R. White 



Alan McClennen 
Stuart B. Avery 
John B. Larson 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D. , Chairman 
Pierre M. Dreyfus, M. D. 
Abigail Avery 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Henry Morgan 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 
James Jagger 



Term Expires 
1969 

1968 



1970 
1969 
1968 



1968 



1969 
1970 
1968 



1968 



1968 
1969 
1970 



1968 
1969 
1970 



1970 
1968 
1969 



19 70 
1969 
1968 



Term Expires 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Robert A. Spence, Chairman 1969 

James DeNormandie 1968 

H. Arnold MacLean 1970 

PLANNING BOARD 

Robert L. Allen, Chairman 1971 

David L. Garrison 1968 

Morton B. Braun 1969 

Richard C. Reece 1970 

David M. Donaldson 1972 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 

Harry Cook 1968 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Richard F. Schroeder 1968 

William T. King 1969 

Clement C. Sawtell 1970 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 

Thomas Winship , Chairman 1970 

Paul Brooks 1969 

Elizabeth Harney 1968 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 
Edwin M. Cole, Chairman Life Trustee 

Morley M. John Life Trustee 

Martha DeNormandie Life Trustee 

John A, Carley (School Committee Appointee) 1970 

Francis H. Gleason (Selectmen Appointee) 1969 

Albert L. Fullerton (Elected by the Town) 1968 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

A Directors 

Victor A. Lutnicki 1968 

Francis Andrews 1969 

Sumner Smith 1970 

Richard B. Bailey 1971 

B Directors 

Hamilton R. James (Appointed by Selectmen) 1969 

Janet Daniels (appointed by School Committee) 1968 

Stanley Heck (Appointed by Library Trustees) 1970 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Warren F. Flint 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



M. Elizabeth Causer (Resigned) 
Lois McClure Light 



CLERK OF SELECTMEN 



M. Elizabeth Causer (Resigned) 
Elizabeth J. Snelling 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WELFARE 



M. Elizabeth Causer (Resigned) 
Leo Jeghelian 



Frank Cande 



Leo J. Algeo 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE 



Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 



Michael McHugh 



Lawrence P. Halle tt 
Charles E. Doyle 
Walter R. Carew 
Richard J. Halle tt 



POLICE SERGEANT 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Leo J. Algeo 



Leo J. Algeo 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 

Lawrence P. Hallett 



FIRE CHIEF 



CONSTABLES 



Term Expires 
1968 

1968 

1968 

1968 



1968 



1968 



1968 



1968 



1968 
1968 
1968 
1968 



1968 



1968 
1968 
1968 



DOG OFFICERS 



Term Expires 



Leo J. Algeo 
Lawrence P. Halle tt 
Daniel A. Maclnnis. Jr. 



Thomas W. Coan 



Leo J. Algeo 



Ernest L. Johnson 



William M. Dean 



PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 



FOREST WARDEN 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



WIRING INSPECTOR 



1968 
1968 
1968 



1968 



1968 



1968 



1968 



Daniel J. Murphy 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTORS OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Eveleth R. Todd 
Ernest L. Johnson 



1968 



1968 



1968 



1968 
1968 



Delbar P. Keily 



Warren R. Dwyer 
Russell P. Mahan 



William B. Whalen 



COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 



FENCE VIEWERS 



VETERANS' AGENT 



1968 



1968 
1968 



1968 



William B. Whalen 



VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 



1968 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 



Mary Jane Butler, Co-Chairman 

John P. Stevenson, Co-Chairman 

Barbara B. Leggatt 

George C. Hibben 

Donna G. Burt 

Nancy G. Butler 

Gwendolyn G. desCognets 

Myrna G. Ehrenfeld 

Walter I. Keyes 

Rhoda K. Taschioglou 

Frederick P. Walkey 



Ruth R. Rich 
Max Mason 

Elizabeth H. Doherty 
David L. Garrison 



LANDSCAPE COMMITTEE 



Term Expires 

1970 
1970 
1968 
1970 
1969 
1968 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 



1968 
1968 
1968 
1968 



William N. Swift 



TOWN COUNSEL 



1968 



TOWN HISTORIAN 



Ruth Wales (Resigned) 
Margaret Flint (Appointed) 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Robert A. Lemire , Chairman 

John Quincy Adams 

Paul Brooks 

James DeNormandie 

Edith M. Henderson 

Walter Van Dorn 

Hans Van Leer 



1968 



1968 
1970 
1969 
1970 
1969 
1969 
1969 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 

Manley B . Boyce 

Roger Walen 

William H. Davis, ex officio 



1969 
1970 
1968 
1968 



NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Katharine S. White 
James DeNormandie 



(Appointee of Selectmen) 
(Appointee of Governor) 



1968 



Term Expires 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



R. Langdon Wales , Chairman 
Henry B. Hoover 
James Jagger 
Hans Van Leer 
Robert D. Gordon 



1971 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1972 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS, BOARD OF APPEALS 
J. Lewis Cunningham 
Robert W. Jevon 



1968 
1969 



BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 



Lawrence B. Anderson 

Stephen W. Herthel 

Stanley Porter 

Walter Belanger, Associate Member 



1969 
1968 
1970 
1968 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 
Joyce Winship, Chairman 
Albert M. Avery, III 
James E. Duffy 
Margaret Flint 
Joseph Campobasso, ex officio, American Legion 



Alvin Levin 
Betty B. Rosenwald 
Frederick Walkey 
Elizabeth Donaldson 
Virginia Jevon 
John Caswell 
Esther Braun 



HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



1969 
1968 
1968 
1969 
1968 



1968 
1968 
1968 
1968 
1968 
1968 
1968 



REGIONAL AGREEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



James Jagger 
Elliott V. Grabill 
John B. French 



1968 
1968 
1968 



REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



John Pike (Resigned) 
Henry Spencer 



1968 



10 



SPECIAL POLICE 



Robert H. Booth 
Joseph Bozak 
Floriy Campobasso 
Joseph Campobasso 
Vincenzo Cassela 
Edward C. Chisholm 
Claire Ciraso (traffic) 
Harry Cook 
John F. Cook 
Lorraine Dean (matron) 
William M. Dean 
James DeNormandie 
William R. Doherty 
Lloyd A. Douty 
Hazel Fedock (matron) 
John J. Fitzgerald 
Warren F. Flint 
John T. Gilbert 
Mary Gilbert (matron) 
Elliott V. Grabill 



Russell L. Haden, Jr. 
Ernest L. Johnson 
William T. King 
Harry B. Knowles , Jr. 
Harry B. Knowles, III 
Karl F. Lahnstein 
Harold E. Lawson 
Paul V. Moynihan 
Mary Murphy (Matron) 
Ronald R. Reichard 
E. Donlan Rooney 
D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 
Carl Smith 
Sumner Smith 
Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. 
Anne Sturgis (traffic) 
Henry Warner 
William B. Whalen 



MOSQUITO CONTROL STUDY COMMITTEE 
John R. Ehrenfeld, Chairman 
David L. Garrison 
Margo C. Lindsay 
Elaine T. Boyer 
Thomas Beal 
Richard Lang 



TEEN AGE RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Susan Reece 
Dorothy Kano 
Betty Mason 



Beatrice Haartz 
John B. Niles 
Richard Reece 



HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



11 



JURY LIST, 1967 



Dorothy Anderson 
Stuart B. Avery 
Robert H. Baldwin 
Bruce M. Bare 
John W. Barber 
Anthony A. Barbera 
John R. Barnard 
William R. Barker 
Edgar E. Barr 
Mary F. Belanger 
Francis E. Bellizia 
Robert G. Brownell 
George U. Browning, Jr, 
John R. Caswell 
Thomas W. Coan 
Robert P. Condit 
Richard D. Coons 
Robert A. Cunningham 
Bruce G. Daniels 
Ronald C. Davis 
Archer B. desCognets 
Davis R. Dewey, II 
Samuel H. Donnell 
Frederick T. Drew 
Jerome J. Duane 
Leeone E. Durnan 
Homer D. Eckhardt 
James J. Faran 
Roy S. Flewelling 
Guy L. Fougere 
Robert M. Fraser 
Albert Fullerton, Jr. 
Lawrence E. Gagne 
Thomas I. Griggs 
Thomas A. 0. Gross 
George C. Hibben 
Robert W. Jevon 
Gerard Kirby 
John B. Larson 
Galen D. Light, Jr. 
Dunbar Lockwood, Jr. 
L. Bruce Long 
Max M. Mason, Jr. 
Henry M. Morgan 



Tower Road 
Lincoln Road 
Meadowdam Road 
Todd Pond Road 
Old Cambridge Turnpike 
Deerhaven Road 
Old Concord Road 
Old Bedford Road 
Weston Road 
Cambridge Turnpike 
Winter Street 
Stonehedge 
Conant Road 
Bedford Road 
Lincoln Road 
Concord Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Woodcock Lane 
Trapelo Road 
Concord Road 
Weston Road 
Old Winter Street 
Blueberry Lane 
Concord Road 
Conant Road 
Lexington Road 
Laurel Drive 
Tabor Hill Road 
Blueberry Lane 
Sandy Pond Road 
Bedford Road 
Blueberry Lane 
Acorn Lane 
Deerhaven Road 
Concord Road 
Cambridge Turnpike 
Trapelo Road 
Bedford Road 
Bedford Road 
Giles Road 
Trapelo Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Winter Street 
Old Concord Road 



12 



JURY LIST, CONTINUED 



Richard W. Moss 
Mark L. Naiman 
Albert E. Nelson 
Milton S. Page 
Leopold Peavy , Jr. 
William M. Rand, Jr. 
Richard C. Reece 
Arthur W. Rice, Jr. 
John A. W. Richardson 
Roland W. Robbins 
George L. Roehr 
Thorvald S. Ross, Jr. 
Standi sh S. Rowe 
Hugh P. Simms 
Donald M. Spooner 
Francis Stewart, Jr. 
Edward S. Taylor 
Lex H. Taylor 
Irving Telling 
Arthur H. Tetreault 
Laura B. Thiessen 
R. Karl Van Leer 
Thomas D. Ward 
George Wells 
John S. Wilbor 
Niels 0. Young 



Oak Knoll 

Weston Road 

Beaver Pond Road 

Giles Road 

Tabor Hill Road 

Lincoln Road 

Trapelo Road 

Sandy Pond Road 

Page Road 

Old Cambridge Turnpike 

Todd Pond Road 

Bedford Road 

Winter Street 

Brooks Road 

Codman Road 

Deerhaven Road 

Tabor Hill Road 

Beaver Pond Road 

Bedford Road 

Mornings ide Lane 

Winter Street 

Conant Road 

Concord Road 

Baker Bridge Road 

Weston Road 

Old Winter Street 



13 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 



ASSISTANT TREASURER 



Ann E. Paddock 



Term Expires 
1968 



APPOINTED BY THE TAX COLLECTOR 



DEPUTY TAX COLLECTOR 



Ann E. Paddock 



1968 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



Alice E. Garrison, R. N, 



COMMUNITY NURSE 



BURIAL AGENT 



William H. Davis 



Philip Martin 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



1968 



1968 



1968 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND MODERATOR 



TOWN BUILDING COMMITTEE 



John Pike, Chairman 
Guilbert S. Winchell 
Alice McKennan 
Gregory Kolligian 
George Hibben 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 



John A. Car ley, Chairman 
Charles W. Calkins, Jr. 
Sylvia B. Neumann 
Robert L. Filbin, ex officio 



1968 
1969 
1971 
1970 
1972 



1970 
1968 
1969 



14 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN AND PLANNING BOARD 
MODERATE INCOME HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Edward Kaelber (Resigned) 

Huson T. Jackson 

Charles Kindleberger (Resigned) 

George Fernald 

Enid Winchell 

R. Langdon Wales 

Mary Glavine 

Kemon Taschioglou (Resigned) 

Mary McNulty 

Thomas Leggatt 






APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Leo A. Palmer, Chairman 1970 

Arthur E. Thiessen 1968 

Louis C. Farley, Jr. 1968 
J. David Hopkins (Resigned) 

Kemon Taschioglou (Appointed) 1969 

Walter Salmon 1969 



LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 

Henry W. Spencer, Chairman 1968 

James E. Duffy, III 1969 

William Williams 1970 



REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL COMMITTEE 



Robert L. Allen 
James T. Foust 
John B. Niles 



VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT PLANNING COMMITTEE 



James M. Jagger 
Alvin Levin 
Margaret Marsh 



15 



TOWN CLERK 
William H. Davis 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. His duties in- 
clude recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, 
and notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appro- 
priations which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept at the 
Town Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the 
Town should communicate with the Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 20, 1967 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called 
to order at 7:35 P. M. by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen. 
The return of the Warrant was read and the invocation was given 
by the Rev. Charles M. Styron. The Moderator then called atten- 
tion to Article 1 (Election of Officers), and, a quorum being 
present, the following business was transacted. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers required by law to be 
elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED : That Harry Cook be elected Measurer of Wood 
and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town Offi- 
cers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED : That the reports of the Town Officers, Com- 
missioners, Committees and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, 
be accepted, and the report of the School Building Committee be 
accepted as a final report and the Committee be dissolved with 
thanks. 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 
any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ 
for additional compensation any of its members and to fix addi- 

16 



tional compensation of such members. 

VOTED: That the salaries of the elected officials of 

the Town for the current year be fixed at the following amounts: 

Selectmen, each $ 100.00 

Treasurer and Collector 700.00 

Town Clerk 1,000.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the neces- 
sary and expedient purposes of the Town or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town adopt as separate appropriations 

the listed recommendations in the Schedule attached to the Re- 
port of the Finance Committee, printed on pages 5 through 11, in- 
clusive, of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1967 Annual 
Town Meeting, except that the Reserve Fund listed on page 11 as 
$13,000 be increased to $16,000, and item #304 "Snow Removal" be 
increased from $14,000 to $16,000, and that all items be raised 
by taxation except to the following extent: 

(a) as to items 15, 30, 320, 321, 504, 520, 521 res- 
pectively, said Schedule contains notations for the application 
of $33,824.47 of funds from specific sources which shall be ap- 
plied; 

(b) items 950 to 956, inclusive, shall be taken from 
Water Department funds, as stated by the notations for the appli- 
cation of such funds; 

(c) reserve fund of $16,000 shall be taken from Over- 
lay Surplus; 

(d) as to item 805 - School Building Bonds - $53,000 
of the amount of $115,000 shall be taken from "Free Cash"; 

(e) as to item 702, "Cemeteries - Maintenance and Ex- 
pense", $500.00 shall be added to be transferred from the Ceme- 
tery Improvement Fund; 

The total for General Purposes for 1967 is $1,921,749. After 

taking into consideration the use of special funds, as indicated 
above, the amount of money to be raised by taxation is $1,818,424 

Article 6. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning January 1, 1968, and to issue a 
note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 



17 



note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, 
in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

VOTED: That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of revenue of the financial year beginning January 
1, 1968, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within 
one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year, in accordance with Section 17, Chap- 
ter 44, General Laws. 

Article 7. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $15,000.00 to be added to the Stabiliza- 
tion Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 

of $15,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization Fund established 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 23 of the Annual 
Meeting on March 16, 1959. 

Article 8. To determine whether the Town will vote to 



appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 to be added to the Stabiliza- 
tion Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That Article 8 be passed over. 

Article 9. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 to be added to the Stabiliza- 
tion Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 

of $30,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization Fund established 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 23 of the Annual 
Meeting on March 16, 1959. 

Article 10. To determine whether the Town will authorize 



the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the 
Town's annual contract with U. S. Commissioner of Education to 
operate the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, 
Massachusetts . 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Select- 
men and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual con- 
tract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate the 



18 



elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Article 11. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
support the School Committee in its continuing plan to bring a 
limited number of children from underprivileged areas to the 
Lincoln Schools for the purposes of education, at no expense to 
the Town of Lincoln. 

VOTED: That the Town support the School Committee 

in its continuing plan to bring a limited number of children from 
underprivileged areas to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of edu- 
cation, at no expense to the Town of Lincoln. 

Article 12. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $403.10 to pay the following un- 
paid 1965 and 1966 bills, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

Legal expenses $103.10 

Board of Health expense 300.00 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 

of $403.10 to pay the following unpaid 1965 and 1966 bills: 
Legal expenses $103.10 

Board of Health expense 300.00 

Article 13. To determine whether the Town will vote to 



appropriate the sum of $18,700.Q0, or any other sum, for the pur- 
chase of equipment for the use of various Public Works Depart- 
ments , or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 

$18,700.00 for the purchase of a heavy duty loader and a backhoe 
for the use of the Public Works Department, of which $14,700.00 
shall be raised by taxation and $4,000.00 transferred from the Sta- 
bilization Fund. 

Article 14. To determine whether the Town will accept the 
provisions of Section 34 of Chapter 82 of the General Laws author- 
izing the Selectmen to reserve spaces between the side lines of 
town ways for bicycle paths and other purposes set forth in said 
section, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town hereby accepts the provisions 

of Section 34 of Chapter 82 of the General Laws authorizing the 
Selectmen to reserve spaces between the side lines of Town ways 
for bicycle paths and for other purposes set forth in said sec- 
tion. 



19 



Article 15. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate a sum of money to lay out and construct a 
bicycle path, partly within the boundaries of Lincoln Road, and 
partly on private lands, from approximately the Library to the 
Railroad Station Parking Area, including a path from approximate- 
ly the Old Town Hall to the Brooks School, all as shown on a 
plan entitled "Lincoln Road Layout, Including Bicycle Path, Lin- 
coln, Mass.", dated February 7, 1966, as revised by Cleverdon, 
Varney & Pike, Consulting Engineers, presently on file in the 
office of the Town Clerk; for said purposes to acquire necessary 
easements or interests in fee by eminent domain, purchase, or 
any other way, from private owners wherever shown on said plan; 
and to provide said sum by taxation or from free cash or partly 
from each, all under the authority of General Laws, Chapter 82, 
Section 35, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 

of $41,500.00 to lay out and construct a bicycle path, partly 
within the boundaries of Lincoln Road and partly on private land 
from approximately the Library to the Railroad Station Parking 
Area, all as shown on a plan entitled "Lincoln Road Layout, In- 
cluding Bicycle Path, Lincoln, Mass.", as revised by "Bicycle 
Path Study, Lincoln, Massachusetts", by Mason and Frey , dated 
November 15, 1966, and by "Taking and Easement Plans in Lincoln, 
Massachusetts" by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, dated March 1, 1967; 
and for that purpose the Selectmen be and hereby are authorized 
and empowered in the name and on behalf of the Town to accept 
gifts of the necessary easements or interests in fee from the 
private owners concerned, as shown on said "Taking and Easement 
Plans in Lincoln, Massachusetts", by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike. 

Article 16. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $1,500.00, or any other sum, for the use 
of the Celebrations Committee established by vote of the Town on 
March 22, 1965, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 

of $1,500.00 for the use of the Celebrations Committee established 
by vote of the Town on March 22, 1965. 

Article 17. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
join the Regional Vocational School District, as authorized by 
Chapter 513 of the Acts of 1966 , appoint three members to a 
special unpaid committee, to be known as a vocational regional 
school district planning committee, and appropriate the sum of 
$250.00 for the use of said committee, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 



20 



VOTED: That the Town join with other Towns to estab- 

lish a Vocational Regional School District Planning Committee; 
that the Moderator be and is hereby authorized and directed to 
appoint three persons to said committee, one of whom shall be a 
member of the School Committee; and that the sum of $250.00 be 
raised and appropriated for the expenses of said Committee, all 
pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 513 of the Acts of 1966. 

Article 18. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
create a Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee, consisting 
of three persons to be appointed by the Moderator, and to author- 
ize said Committee to join with other such committees from two 
or more contiguous cities or towns to form a Regional Refuse Dis- 
posal Planning Board, all pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 
748 of the Acts of 1965, or to take any action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town establish a Regional Refuse 

Disposal Planning Committee to determine the advisability of 
joining with other such committees from one or more contiguous 
cities or towns to form a Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board, 
and that the Moderator be and hereby is authorized and directed 
to appoint three persons to said Committee, all pursuant to the 
provisions of Chapter 748 of the Acts of 1965. 

Article 19. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
authorize the Selectmen to establish a sanitary fill operation for 
the dumping of refuse for residents of the Town, to acquire a 
site for such dump by lease, purchase, eminent domain or other- 
wise, and to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the cost of 
such acquisition and the cost of operation of such dump for the 
period ending at the next annual Town Meeting, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Selectmen be and they hereby are 

authorized and empowered in the name and on behalf of the Town to 
acquire by lease a site to establish a disposal area for the dis- 
posal of refuse for residents, said disposal area to be operated 
on a sanitary fill basis, and that the sum of $9,900.00 be raised 
and appropriated for the cost of such acquisition and the cost of 
operation of such disposal area. 

Article 20. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
replace the existing fire alarm system connecting the Fire and 
Police Station to the Town Hall, and to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 

the sum of $4,100.00 for the purpose of replacing the existing 



21 



fire alarm system connecting the Fire and Police Station and the 
Town Hall. 

Article 21. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
enable the Board of Selectmen, on behalf of the Town, to lease to 
Murray and Patricia F. Horwitz , for a term of 30 years, a rectan- 
gular parcel of land, approximately 180 feet by 200 feet, adja- 
cent to the eastern boundary of Lot A-2, as shown on a plan by 
Snelling, Hilton and Associates, dated July 30, 1966, in return 
for certain rights of way and agreement by the lessees to build 
and maintain, at the sole expense of the lessees, a pond suitable 
for fish, wildlife, and fire protection, as recommended by the 
U. S. Conservation Service and the Fire Department of the Town of 
Lincoln. 

VOTED: To pass over the article. 

Article 22. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
rescind the remaining unissued balance of the Water Loan author- 
ized by vote of the Town under Article 1 of a special Town Meet- 
ing, held on November 1, 1965, said balance being $20,000.00. 

VOTED: That the Town rescind the remaining unissued 

balance of the Water Loan authorized by vote of the Town under 
Article 1 of a Special Town Meeting, held on November 1, 1965. 

(At this point Mr. Grabill mentioned the good services ren- 
dered to the Town by Mr. Taylor, Mr. Wadsworth, Dr. Culver, Mr. 
Palmer, and, at the mention of Mrs. Causer's name, the voters 
rose and gave her a hearty round of applause.) 

On motion duly seconded, the meeting was adjourned at 11:45 
P. M. 

William H. Davis 
Town Clerk 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 25, 1967 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant, the Polls were 
declared open at 8 o'clock A. M. by Mr. Harold E. Lawson, Warden. 
Marjorie E. Nelson and Catherine M. Coan were duly sworn as Ballot 
Clerks. At 11 o'clock A. M. Mr. Elliott V. Grabill assumed the 

duties as Warden until 5 o'clock P. M. when Mr. Harold E. Lawson 



22 



again resumed the duties and declared the Polls closed at 
o'clock P. M. Total number of ballots cast was 385. 



Town Clerk (1 year) 
Selectman (3 years) 



William H. Davis 
Blanks 

Russell L. Haden, Jr. 

Scattering 

Blanks 



357 
28 

287 

2 

96 



Collector of Taxes 
(1 year) 



Frederick B. Taylor 
Blanks 



336 
49 



Assessor (3 years) 



Treasurer (1 year) 



Frank R. Stevens 
Michael Belanger 
Blanks 

Frederick B. Taylor 
Blanks 



265 

115 

5 

331 

54 



School Committee 
(3 years) 



John R. White 
Blanks 



321 
64 



Regional District 
School Committee 



(3 years) 


Henry Morgan 
Blanks 


324 
61 


Water Commissioner 
(3 years) 


John R. Larson 

Scattering 

Blanks 


328 

1 

56 


Board of Health 
(3 years) 


Gordon A. Donaldson, M.D. 
Blanks 


351 
34 


Cemetery Commissioner 
(3 years) 


H. Arnold MacLean 
Blanks 


340 
45 


Planning Board 
(5 years) 


David Donaldson 
Blanks 


339 
46 



23 



Planning Board 
(3 years) 



Richard C. Reece 
Blanks 



325 
60 



Commissioner of 
Trust Funds 
(3 years) 



Clement C. Sawtell 
Blanks 



332 
53 



Trustee of Bemis Fund 
(3 years) 



Thomas Winship 
Blanks 



331 

54 



Director of DeCordova 
& Dana Museum & Park 
(4 years) 



Richard B. Bailey 
Blanks 



323 
62 



Question - "Shall the town pay one half the premium costs payable 
by retired employees for group life insurance and for 
group general or blanket hospital, surgical and med- 
ical insurance?" 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



151 

208 

26 



William H. Davis 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 5, 1967 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen. The invocation 
was given by the Rev. Morris R. Robinson. The return of the War- 
rant was read, and, there being a quorum present, the following 
transactions took place. 

Article 1. To determine whether the Town will vote 

to appropriate the sum of $9,500.00, or any other sum, for the 
purchase of equipment for the use of the Public Works Department, 



24 



or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of 

$11,638.00 for the purchase of a used shovel dozer for the use of 
the Public Works Department; of this sum $3,375.00 to be taken 
from the balance in the dump rent and maintenance account, appro- 
priated on March 20, 1967, and $8,263.00 to be taken from free 
cash. 

Article 2. To determine whether the Town will 

accept as a Town Way Wheeler Road, from Bedford Road to and in- 
cluding the turnaround, as shown on a plan entitled "Wheeler Sub- 
division in Lincoln, Mass., owned by Rural Land Foundation of 
Lincoln", dated January 19, 1966, Rowland H. Barnes & Co. , Civil 
Engineers, recorded in the South Middlesex District Registry of 
Deeds as #201 of 1966, and for this purpose will authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or 
otherwise, the land contained therein, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town accept as a Town Way 

Wheeler Road, from Bedford Road to and including the turnaround, 
as shown on a plan entitled "Wheeler Subdivision in Lincoln, Mass. , 
owned by Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln", dated January 19, 1966, 
Rowland H. Barnes & Co., Civil Engineers, recorded as #201 of 1966 
in Middlesex South Registry of Deeds, and that for this purpose 
the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent 
domain, purchase, or otherwise, the land therein contained and to 
accept a confirmatory deed thereto. 

Article 3. To determine whether the Town will vote 



to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, or any other sum, 
to pay for a study and preliminary plans for increasing the usable 
space in the Library, or take any action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the 

sum of $2,000.00 to pay for a study and preliminary plans for in- 
creasing the usable space in the Lincoln Public Library, said sum 
to be taken from free cash. 

Article 4. To determine whether the Town will vote 

to appropriate the sum of $14,029.20 for the purpose of repairing 
Lincoln Road from Sandy Pond Road to the railroad crossing under 
the provisions of Chapter 679, of the Acts of 1965, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of 

$14,029.20 for the purpose of repairing Lincoln Road from Sandy 
Pond Road to the railroad crossing under the provisions of Chapter 



25 



679 of the Acts of 1965, said sum to be taken from free cash and 
returned thereto when received from the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts. 



On motion duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 8:55 P.M. 



William H. Davis 
Town Clerk 



26 









FINANCE 



TOWN TREASURER 

Frederick B. Taylor 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1967 



General Water Total 



Cash balance 1/1/67 $ 432,260.44 $ 52,407.47 $ 484,667.91 

*Receipts 1967 4,476,106.86 65,329.82 4,541,436.68 

Warrant payments 1967 4,456,905.90 107,669.52 4,564,575.42 

Service transfers + 422 . 74 - 422.74 

Cash balance 12/31/67 $ 451,884.14 $ 9,645.03 $ 461,529.17 

* For details see 

Accountant's Report 

Cash Balance 12/31/67: 

Harvard Trust Co. $ 205,080.06 $ 9,645.03 $ 214,725.09 

Lexington Trust Co. 9,437.15 9,437.15 

N. E. Merchants National 

Bank 125,381.94 — 125,381.94 

Concord Cooperative Bank 6,000.00 6,000.00 

State Street Bank and 

Trust Co. 5,000.00 — 5,000.00 

First National Bank 708.82 708.82 

Belmont Savings Bank 6,988.72 6,988.72 

Beverly Savings Bank 7,667.02 7,667.02 

Boston 5c Savings Bank 7,102.65 7,102.65 

Brookline Savings Bank 3,952.35 3,952.35 

Cambridge Savings Bank 8,409.56 8,409.56 

Charlestown Savings Bank 8,884.40 8,884.40 

Lynn 5c Savings Bank 7,854.56 7,854.56 

Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 17,166.19 17,166.19 

Newton Savings Bank 7,873.92 7,873.92 

Provident Institution 

for Savings 8,064.90 8,064.90 

Waltham Savings Bank 4,799.42 4,799.42 

Warren Institution 

for Savings 11,512.48 — 11,512.48 

$451,884.14 $ 9,645.03 $ 461,529.17 



27 



STABILIZATION FUND 



Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1967 $ 35.71 

Appropriations into Fund at 1967 Annual 
Town Meeting 

For school purposes 15,000.00 

For conservation land 30,000.00 

Interest income of 1967 5,000.37 



Appropriation from Fund at 1967 Annual 
Town Meeting 

For equipment $ 4,000.00 

Deposited in savings banks 41,000.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 5,000 .37 



Bank Balance at December 31, 1967 



First National Bank of Boston 
Boston 5c Savings Bank 
Home Savings Bank 
Natick 5c Savings Bank 
Suffolk-Franklin Savings Bank 
Warren Institution for Savings 
Whitman Savings Bank 



$50,036.08 



Cash balance at December 31, 1967 $ 35.71 



Earmarked Balances in Fund 

For school purposes 

For equipment 32,500.00 

For conservation land 30,000.00 

Unallocated increment 9,022.39 



$ 35.71 




29,200.48 




28,140.47* 




17,400.58 




27,844.26 




28,129.69- 


Jti 


8,231.20 


Hi 




Ha 


138,982.39 


Hi 




5a 




e; 

l: 


67,460.00 


Ha 
k 



$138,982.39 



28 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1967 $ 5.55 

Savings bank interest income in 1967 12 . 13 

$ 17.68 
Bank interest allowed to accumulate 12 . 13 

Cash balance at December 31, 1967 $ 5.55 

Bank Deposits at December 31, 1967 

First National Bank of Boston $ 5.55 

Boston 5c Savings Bank 238.56 

$244.11 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 



Julia A. Bemis $300.00 

William W. Benjamin 500.00 

Marie H. Bisbee 200.00 

Mildred E. Bowles 200.00 

Agnes L. Brown 300.00 

Sarah J. Browning 200.00 

Elizabeth G. Chap in 300.00 

Robert B. Chapin 300.00 

William H. Costello 100.00 

Mary H. Cushing 100.00 

Anthony J. Doherty 500.00 

Paul Dorian 150.00 

Charles P. Farnsworth 350.00 

Edward R. Farrar 300.00 

Francis Flint 250.00 

Orila J. Flint 300.00 

Donald Gordon 300.00 

Raymond E. Haggerty 150.00 

George Harrington 100.00 

Samuel Hartwell 300.00 

Thomas Huddles ton 200.00 

Abijah G. Jones 300.00 

John J. Kelliher 200.00 



29 



Gardner Moore $300.00 

Lena M. Newell 325.00 

Joa Pacewicz 400.00 

John H. Pierce 500.00 

Anne D. Pollard 300.00 

Charles 0. Preble 100.00 

Annie A. Ray 300.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

E. H. Rogers 250.00 

Mary James Scripture 500.00 

Eugene Sherman 200.00 

Charles S. Smith 300.00 

J. Waldo Smith 300.00 

Webster Smith 300.00 

Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 

George G. Tarbell 400.00 

Laura B. & Arthur E. Thiessen 500.00 

Maria L. Thompson 500.00 

Mabel H. Todd 200.00 

Ellen T. Trask 200.00 

Albert Washburn 500.00 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 

Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 

Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 

Deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings $14,812.27 



Perpetual Care Fund income accumulated prior to 1967 $ 5,818.81 

1967 interest income 858.65 

$ 6,677.46 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, per Cemetery Commissioners, 

for maintenance of lots 500 .00 

Accumulated perpetual care fund income at Dec. 31, 1967 $ 6,177.46 



30 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 



10,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $10,000 December 1, 
1968, issued under Chapter 208, Acts of 1948. 

4,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 December 1, 1968, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 

48,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $12,000 each December 1, 
1968-1971, issued under Chapter 356, Acts of 1951. 

16,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each December 1, 
1968-19 71, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 

200,000 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000 each October 1, 
1968-19 77, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

25,000 School Construction Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each October 1, 
1968-19 72, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 

120,000 School Project Loan, 3.70%, due $10,000 each November 1, 
1968-1979, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

550,000 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $40,000 each November 15, 
1968-1972, and $35,000 each November 15, 19 73-1982, issued 
under the Acts of 1948. 

75,000 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000 each November 15, 
1968-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948. 



$ 1,048,000 Total School Loans 

50,000 Fire and Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each 

October 1, 1968-1977, issued under Chapter 44, General 
Laws as amended. 

15,000 Library Addition Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 each August 1, 
1968-19 70, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 

5,000 Land Purchase Loan, 2.80%, due $5,000 December 1, 1968, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 

75,000 Conservation Land Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000 each March 1, 
1968-1982, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 



$ 1,193,000 Net Debt 



31 



5,000 Water Mains Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 August 1, 1968, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 

65,000 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $10,000 each August 1, 1968-1972, 
$8,000 August 1, 1973, and $7,000 August 1, 1974, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 

2,000 Water Mains Loan, 2.80%, due $1,000 each December 1, 
1968-1969, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, as 
amended. 

55,000 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $5,000 each August 15, 1968-1978, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 

45,000 Water Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000 each May 1, 1968-1976, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 



$ 1,365,000 Total Debt at December 31, 1967 



SCHEDULE OF DEBT MATURITIES 



(000 omitted) 






Fire & 


Land 








Debt 






Police 


Conser- 








Maturing in: 


School 


Library 


Bldg. 


vation 


Water 




Total 


1968 


$110 


$ 5 


$ 5 


$ 10 


$ 26 


$ 


156 


1969 


96 


5 


5 


5 


21 




132 


19 70 


96 


5 


5 


5 


20 




131 


1971 


96 




5 


5 


20 




126 


19 72 


80 




5 


5 


20 




110 


19 73 


70 




5 


5 


18 




98 


19 74 


70 




5 


5 


17 




97 


19 75 


70 




5 


5 


10 




90 


19 76 


70 




5 


5 


10 




90 


1977 


70 




5 


5 


5 




85 


1978 


50 






5 


5 




60 


19 79 


50 






5 






55 


1980 


40 






5 






45 


19 81 


40 






5 






45 


1982 


40 


— 


— 


_5 







45 




$1,048 


$15 


$50 


$80 


$172 


$1 


,365 



Note: This schedule does not include Lincoln's share of the debt of the 
Lincoln- Sudbury Regional School District, nor does it reflect the 
amounts payable by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the 
Federal government from time to time towards the above obliga- 
tions . 



32 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Lois McClure Light 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



Real and Personal 

Valuation 1965 less abatements 

Valuation 1966 less abatements 

Valuation 1967 less abatements 

Motor Vehicle 

Valuation 1965 less abatements 
Valuation 1966 less abatements 
Valuation 1967 less abatements 

Net Valuation 

Average Net Valuation 

5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 



$14,147,172.00 
37,462,940.00 
39,876,391.00 



2,102,761.00 
2,180,281.00 
2,760,922.00 

98,530,467.00 

32,843,489.00 

1,642,174.00 



FUNDED DEBT 



General 

Inside Limit 
Outside Limit 

Enterprise, Water 

Total Funded Debt, January 1, 1968 

Available Borrowing Capacity January 1, 1968 



190,000.00 
1,003,000.00 

172,000.00 

1,365,000.00 

$ 1,452,174.00 



33 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Current Year: 
Personal tax 
Real Estate tax 



Prior Years 



$ 83,136.78 
1,370,973.00 



Grants and Gifts: 
School Construction 
School Transportation 



43,412.77 
45,077.13 



$1,454,109.78 



Personal tax 


667.95 






Real Estate tax 


20,027.48 










20,695 


.43 


From the State: 








Veterans' Benefits 


43.93 






Old Age Assistance 


6,914.39 






Old Age Assistance Adm. 


314.65 






Medical Assistance 


6,155.98 






Medical Assistance Adm. 


287.61 






Tuition and transportation 








of children 


2,293.00 






Aid to Libraries 


1,403.25 




Loss of taxes 


1,461.52 






Valuation Basis 


194,466.81 






Abatements to Veterans 


973.10 






Special Education Program 


4,136.23 






Special Aid, Ch. 70 


74,939.49 






Meals Tax 


1,515.94 










294,905 


.90 


City of Cambridge in lieu 








of taxes 




600 


.55 


Permits : 








Building 


1,435.90 






Plumbing 


503.00 






Wiring 


928.15 










2,867 


05 


Fines : 








Court 




262 


00 



88,489.90 



34 



From Federal Grants : 
Old Age Assistance 
Old Age Assistance Adm. 
Medical Aid to the Aged 
Medical Aid to the Aged Adm. 



4,100.00 
840.61 

7,618.31 
825.94 



$ 13,384.86 



School Aid, Ch. 864 
School Aid, Ch. 874 
Title I, Co-op Research 
Air Force School 



13,663.93 

19,198.00 

2,350.00 

334,680.25 



369,892.18 



From County : 
Dog Licenses 



838.61 



Privileges 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 

1963 

1965 

1966 

1967 
Farm Animal Excise 



117.84 

647.67 

21,791.41 

151,394.54 

27.25 



173,978.71 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 
Town Clerk 
Collector of Taxes 
Board of Appeals 
Town Hall rental 



230.88 
16.00 
306.10 
110.00 
160.00 



822.98 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police 




Pistol permits 


83.00 


Insurance reports 


228.00 


Regional School attendance 




officer 


150.00 



461.00 



35 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Dog Inoculations 
Garbage Collection 
Licenses 



HIGHWAYS 



136.50 

4,646.12 

36.50 



$ 4,819.12 



Chapter 90 Maintenance 

State Aid 

County Aid 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Snow Removal 
Chapter 679 - Highway 
Sanitary Fill 



3,000.00 
3,000.00 

1,031.75 

14,027.20 

220.00 



21,278.95 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



Refunds and reimbursements 



941.59 



SCHOOLS 



Tuition 

Metco 

Rentals and Miscellaneous 

Rentals of class rooms by 

Air Force School 
Milk Fund 

Air Force School Cafeteria 
Miscellaneous 



2,293.00 

6,307.50 

495.00 

6,000.00 

7,941.62 

28,803.72 

439.24 



52,280.08 



LIBRARY 



Library Fines 



2,236.33 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Telephone Fees 5.09 

Insurance Refunds & Settlements 4,587.12 

Air Force School Reimbursement 13,397 .73 



17,989.94 



36 










RECREATION 






Dog Training 
Tennis Instruction 
Skiing Instruction 
Golf Instruction 
Playground 
Special Events 


$ 


75.00 
386.00 
432.50 
324.00 
1,030.84 
324.33 


$ 2,572.67 






CEMETERIES 






Interments 
Foundations 




INTEREST 


940.00 
109.37 


1,049.37 


Interest on 
Interest on 
Interest on 
Interest on 


Taxes 
Deposits 
Investments 
Cemetery Fund 




1,244.12 

4,973.89 

4,089.07 

710.56 


11,017.64 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENTS 



Conservation Fund 

Conservation Receipts Reserved 

Dog Licenses 

Grammar School Fund 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund 

Deputy Collector 

Non Revenue Investment 

Cemetery Improvement Fund 





35,950.00 


d 


35,337.50 




1,615.75 




52.96 


nd 


1,014.78 




676.53 




546,523.33 




19,086.13 


REFUNDS 





640,256.98 



Refunds and Cancellations 2,725.09 

GUARANTEE DEPOSIT-PLANNING BOARD 

Deposit for anticipated 

Improvements 5,000.00 



37 



LOANS 



Employee Deductions 
Mass. Payment for Services 
Temporary Loans 
Conservation Land Loan 
Premium on Loan 



TOTAL GENERAL RECEIPTS 

CASH BALANCE, JANUARY 1, 1967 



$317,161.49 

143.16 

900,000.00 

75,000.00 

325.50 



WATER REVENUE 



Water Rates 
Water Connections 
Miscellaneous 
Rent of hydrants 
Reimb urs ements 

TOTAL WATER REVENUE 

CASH BALANCE, JANUARY 1, 1967 



32,706.25 

17,433.00 

92.00 

14,950.00 

148.57 



$1,292,630.15 
$4,476,106.86 



432,260.44 



$4,908,367.30 



$ 65,329.82 



52,407.47 



$ 117,737.29 



38 



EXPENDITURES 
Payments on Selectmen's Warrants 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 

Executive Secretary 

Finance Committee 

Town Office 

Town Accountant 

Treasurer & Collector 

Assessors 

Legal 

Town Clerk 

Election & Registration 

Street Lists & Expense 

Planning Board 

Board of Appeals 

Conservation Commission 

Consulting & Engineering 

Town Hall 



1,248.59 

13,020.95 

15.00 

22,657.03 

5,002.60 

3,223.40 

1,850.65 

4,232.37 

1,140.62 

264.00 

853.55 

2,737.83 

71.25 

6,512.18 

4,985.47 

6,203.71 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police 
Fire 

Communications 

Civil Defense 

Fire and Police Building 

Inspectors of Buildings 

Replace Fire Alarm System 



60,191.50 

56,740.59 

19,675.56 

965.16 

3,729.90 

3,925.17 

4,006.45 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Salaries 
Exp ens e 

Inspection Service 
Garbage Collection 
Inspector of Animals 



5,203.67 
2,492.69 
1,559.08 
8,476.73 
100.00 



$74,019.20 



149,234.33 



17,832.17 



39 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Public Works - General 
Public Works Building 
Concord Road Repairs 
Lincoln Road Repairs 
Highway Equipment 
Chapter 90 Maintenance 
Shovel Dozer 
Bicycle Path 

(Special Article #15) 
Sanitary Fill 

(Special Article #19) 



$114,692.44 

2,459.65 

1,544.68 

14,029.00 

16,979.90 

9,000.00 

11,638.00 

27,232.61 

9,418.51 



$ 206,994.79 



Aid to Citizens 
Administration 
Veterans ' Services 



CHARITIES 



EDUCATION 



35,498.46 

3,679.04 

354.63 



39,532.13 



Elementary School 

Regional High School 

Chapter 864 

Chapter 874 

Title I, Co-op. Research 

Air Force School 



826,181.05 
340,373.40 



6,221.02 
640,466.63 



1,813,242.10 



LIBRARY 



Library 

Library Building 



36,653.46 
5,106.19 



41,759.65 



RECREATION 



Salaries 

Playground 

Ski School 

Golf 

Dog Training 



5,063.80 
2,251.53 

75.00 
200.00 

75.00 



7,665.33 



40 



CEMETERIES 

Cemeteries $ 3,772.85 

TOWN DEBT SERVICE 

Temporary Loan - Conservation $ 75,000.00 

Bond Payments 130,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 40,141.25 
Interest on Tax Anticipation 

Notes 7,251.30 

Exp ens es 83.25 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 24,479.50 
Employee Insurance & Hospital 

Fund 16,916.87 

Property & Indemnity Insurance 15,864.54 

Dump rent and maintenance 1,125.00 

Town Reports 2,822.75 

Celebrations Committee 1,524.68 

Preservation of Town Records 41.64 

Unpaid Bills 403.10 

Purchase of Warren Land 20,000.00 

Purchase of Browning Land 66,850.00 

Purchase of Campobasso Property 10,000.00 

Stabilization Fund 41,000.00 



252,475.80 



201,028.08 



REFUNDS 

Refunds 11,346.10 

AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Non-Revenue Cash Investment 299,376.33 

Dog Licenses - due County 1,609.50 

Milk Fund 7,841.78 

Hanscom School Cafeteria 32,442.75 

Repayment of Temporary Loan 900,000.00 

State Audit 2,152.90 

County Hospital Assessment 1,181.56 

County Tax 57,722.56 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 521.85 



41 



M. A. P. C. 

Public Welfare Reimbursement 

State Parks and Reservations 

M. B. T. A. 

Deputy Collection Fees 



Employee Deductions 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

CASH BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 1967 



204.10 
3,608.62 
6,626.04 
6,425.80 

691.53 



$1,320,405.32 
317,175.31 

$4,456,483.16 
451,884.14 

$4,908,367.30 



EXPENDITURES 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Salaries and Wages $ 17,592.38 

General Expense 6,004.34 

Water Supply Expense 7,935.56 

Water Transmission Expense 24,638.63 

Bonds and Interest 32,134.00 

Water Refund 230.00 

Water Mains 15,292.91 

Development of Well Fields 4,264.44 

TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT EXPENSE 

CASH BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 1967 



$ 108,092.26 

9,645.03 

$ 117,737.29 



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56 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1967 

GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ASSETS 



Cash 

General 
Water 

Petty Cash Advances 

Accounts Receivable 
Taxes 

Levy of 1965 

Real 
Levy of 1966 

Personal 

Real 
Levy of 1967 

Personal 

Real 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 
Levy of 1964 
Levy of 1965 
Levy of 1966 
Levy of 1967 

Board of Health 

Garbage Collections 

Water Rates 1967 

Aid to Highways 
State 
County 

Unprovided for or overdrawn accounts 
State Assessments 1967 

Recreation Areas 

M.B.T.A. 
Overlay 1967 
Federal Grants 

Old Age Assistance 



$ 451,884.14 
9,645.03 

95.00 



6.16 



149.30 




4,188.50 


4,337.80 


294.89 




7,369.88 


7,664.77 


92.40 




122.10 




127.88 




2,524.19 


2,866.57 




4,371.75 




26,732.20 


12,791.99 




6,396.00 


19,187.99 


1,089.30 




78.71 




1,892.15 




538.55 


3,598.71 




$ 530,390.12 



57 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVE 



Receipts in Advance of Commitment 
State 

Old Age Assistance 

Medical Assistance 



727.43 
365.13 



$ 1,092.56 



Ag en cy 

Dog Licenses due County 



26.25 



Trust Fund Income 

Julian DeCordova School Equipment Fund 
Grammar School Fund 



1,014.78 
52.96 



1,067.74 



Premium on Loans 
Conservation 



209.25 



Recoveries 

Old Age Assistance 
Medical Assistance 

Federal Grants 

Disability Assistance Adm. 
Aid to Dependent Children Adm. 
Old Age Assistance Adm. 
Medical Assistance Adm. 
Medical Assistance 

School: 

Co-operative Research 

P.L. 864 

P.L. 874 

Operation of School at Air Force Base 

Conservation 

Revolving Funds 

School Milk Program 

Air Force Base School Cafeteria 



160.49 






581.10 


741 


.59 


80.05 






95.58 






171.90 






111.53 






72.08 






726.71 






13,663.93 






19,198.00 






74,227.30 






35,950.00 


144,297 


.08 


316.35 






1,642.57 


1,958 


.92 



Appropriation Balances: 
Revenue 

General 
N on- Revenue 

Water - Well Field 



83,128.18 
3,167.31 



86,295.49 



Guarantee Deposits 
Planning Board 

Tailings - Unclaimed Checks 



5,000.00 
193.10 



Overestimate 1967 Assessment 
County Tax 



3,671.73 



58 



Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 
State 

Aid to Libraries 

Conservation 
Cemetery Improvements 



1,403.25 
35,337.50 
18,996.69 $ 



55,737.44 



Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 



13,890.57 



Overlays Reserved for Abatements 
Levy of 1965 



6.16 



Revenue Reserved until Collected 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Departmental 
Water 
Aid to Highways 



2,866.57 

4,372.32 

26,732.20 

19,187.99 



53,159.08 



Reserved for Petty Cash Advances 



95.00 



Surplus Revenue 
General 
Water 



156,046.74 



162,968.16 



59 



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61 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 
Frank R. Stevens 
John B. French 



The employment of a professional appraiser to assist the Board with 
the valuation of new buildings and the major additions to older ones, as 
recommended in our last report and favorably endorsed by the Town at the 
last Annual Meeting, has been most satisfactory, and the Board recommends 
that this practice be continued. The Board has been able to employ the 
same personnel who made the revaluation of the whole Town in 1965 , so a 
continuity of the same degree of personal judgment has been available in 
evaluating the new properties. By such assistance the pick up of addi- 
tional valuation from the previous year is made possible at the very start 
of the new year, thus providing the Board with information that it and 
other Town committees can use in working on financial matters, prior to 
the coming Annual Town Meeting. Further, with this early information 
on new valuations and the results of the Town Meeting as regards expendi- 
tures voted, the Board is then in a position for earlier setting of the 
tax rate. 

With the continued increase in taxes , the Board wishes to point out 
some of the items that effect this trend. In the past six-year period, 
1962-1967 inclusive, the number of houses assessed, which is a barometer 
of the number of persons responsible for footing the tax burden in the 
Town, has increased about 10%, while the net amount to be raised by taxa- 
tion, after deleting those tax revenues levied against the utilities, has 
increased 65%. To be more realistic, consider that in 1962 the amount 
to be raised by taxation was $800 per house, while in 1967 this was $1198, 
an increase of 50%. Most of these amounts are, of course, the expendi- 
tures voted by the townspeople at the Annual and Special Meetings; how- 
ever, there are ever-increasing demands assessed upon the Town over which 
we have little or no control. The Board is now referring to direct 
assessments made by the County of Middlesex, the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, and the Mass. Bay Transportation Authority. In this same six- 
year period, the County assessment has increased from $24,602 to $73,651, 
while the Commonwealth assessments have gone from $4,664 to $9,245. In 
addition in the last two years, the MBTA assessment has been $3,811 and 
$6,347 respectively. In the year of 1967 these three assessments 
amounted to $2.16 of our tax rate of $37. 

For the benefit of the newer tax payers who have become a part of 
our community, and to provide a ready reference for our older ones, we 
list below some of the more general regulations dealing with excise and 
real estate taxes as they are applicable in the Town. 

1. The status of property on January 1st is the deter- 
minant of the tax in any year. 

2. All real estate and personal property tax abatement 



62 



requests must be filed with the Board by October 1st 
of the year in question. 

3. Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement re- 
quests must be filed with the Board before July 1 of 
the year succeeding the year in question. If you 
change cars during the year, the burden is on you to 
file the abatement request. 

4. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41, of the General Laws, 
as amended, provides for certain exemptions for tax- 
payers over the age of 70, who meet certain require- 
ments of income, residence, etc. Additional informa- 
tion may be obtained from the Assessors' Office. 

5. Veterans with 10% or more disability, holdess of the 
Purple Heart awards, and others, may qualify for a tax 
exemption. Please contact the Board to see if you 
qualify. 



1967 Recapitulation 

Total Appropriations to be raised from Taxation $1,935,777.63 

Total Appropriations to be taken from Available Funds 264,240.67 

State Parks and Reservations 5,536.74 

State Parks and Reservations, Underestimate, 1966 829.59 

State Audit of Municipal Accounts 2,152.90 

MBTA 6,347.09 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 521.85 

MAPC 204.10 

MAPC, Underestimate, 1966 22.93 

County Tax 61,394.29 

County Tax, Underestimate, 1966 11,074.64 

County Hospital 1,181.56 

Offsets to Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 18,019.38 

1966 Overlay Deficit 312.13 

Overlay of Current Year 17,527.27 

Gross Amount to be Raised $2,325,142.77 



Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

Estimated receipts from Local Aid and Agency Funds $ 386,843.42 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 145,000.00 

General Government 5,165.00 

Health and Sanitation 9,015.00 



63 



Schools 
Libraries 
Recreation 
Interest 
All Other 

Total Estimated Receipts 

Overestimate, MBTA (1966) 

Appropriations voted to be taken from Available Funds 

Total, Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

Net Amount to be raised by Taxation 



15,056.00 
2,730.00 
2,091.00 

16,307.00 
2,508.00 

$ 584,715.42 

41.71 

264,240.67 

848,997.80 

1,476,144.97 

$2,325,142.77 



Total Valuation: 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 



$ 2,257,510 



at $37 
at $37 



$39,895,810 
Number of Acres of land assessed 
Number of Dwelling Houses assessed 
Tax Rate per thousand : 



School Rate 
General Rate 



$22.75 
14.25 



$ 83,527.87 

1,392,617.10 

$1,476,144.97 

7,167.14 

1,166 






$37.00 



64 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENTS 
Leo J. Algeo, Chief 



I hereby submit my report for the Fire and Police Depart- 
ments for the year ending December 31, 196 7. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The department answered a total of 271 calls as listed be- 
low: 



Building 


5 


Chimney 


4 


Brush and Woods 


48 


Motor Vehicle 


14 


Electric wires down 




or arcing 


21 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 


61 


Miscellaneous 


118 




271 



The building fires consisted of 3 houses, 1 apartment and 1 
hanger at Hanscom Field. The total estimated loss in these fires 
was $33,500.00. 

The Fire Department inspected and issued permits for the 
following installations during 1967: 

Oil tanks , outside 9 

Oil tanks, inside 4 

Oil burners 15 

Gas tanks 2 

30 

A permit was issued for the removal of 3 gas tanks. 

1,003 permits were issued for outside burning. 

21 permits were issued for blasting. 



65 



An inspection of our nursing homes was made every 3 months, 
fire drills conducted and fire alarm systems tested. 

Fire drills were conducted at all Lincoln Schools as well as 
at our Nursery Schools. 

The nineteen fire alarm boxes were inspected and tested every 
month. 

We are continuing daily, weekly and monthly checks of our 
equipment. 

Firefighter James Casella installed 10,000 feet of new fire 
alarm cable from the Fire Station to the Town Hall. With the 
assistance of members of the department and a great deal of in- 
genuity, Casella did a tremendous job and saved the Town a large 
expense. 

Firefighter Casella conducted a class for Battery A at the 
Nike base here in Lincoln in February on the Chemistry of Fire 
Fighting. 

In November Casella attended a program on forest fire con- 
trol and fighting given by the State Department of Natural Resources 
at the Fire Training Academy in Framingham. 

Firefighter Joseph Bozak attended a 20-hour course at the 
Academy in Fire Service Operations in April and May. 

An excellent training program was conducted during the 
spring for both the regular men and the call men by the Staff of 
the Central Massachusetts Fire Training Academy. The Academy, in 
co-operation with the Massachusetts Bureau of Vocational Education, 
was able to provide this program to the men here in Lincoln at no 
expense to the Town. Qualified instructors came here on Thursday 
evenings for 6 weeks and gave instruction in the following subjects: 

1. Ropes and knots 

2. Protective breathing equipment 

3. Component parts of pumps and simplified 

hydraulics 

4. Hose and ladders concurrent with pump 

operations 

5. Special forcible entry and rescue tools 

6. Combined fire evolutions 



66 



Fire Chief Edward H. McCormack, at Cushing Hospital, Framing- 
ham, is Administrator of the Fire Training Academy, and I am deep- 
ly indebted to him and his fine staff for conducting this program 
for us. 

I am urgently recommending the replacement of Engine 2 this 
year. This piece of equipment is now 22 years old and incapable 
of the performance required of it. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Arrests by Lincoln Police 151 

Arrests by State Police 16 

Violations of Motor Vehicle 

Law recorded 423 

Warnings issued 281 

Court Summonses issued 142 

Total Fines paid $1,585.00 

Motor Vehicle Accident report: 

Accidents reported 244 

Occupants injured 182 

Occupants killed 6 

Following is a partial list of other activities of the 
Police Department: 

Appearances in Court 116 
Emergency calls other than 

Motor Vehicle accidents 60 

Checks made at vacant houses 5930 

Checks made at business places 9480 
Summonses served for other 

Police Departments 374 

Burglaries investigated 27 

Estimated loss $44,576.51 

Larcenies investigated 48 

Estimated loss $ 5,766.00 

Value of property recovered $13,973.00 



67 



Dog complaints investigated 139 
Motor Vehicle registration 

numbers checked for 

ownership or stolen 

record 705 

Miscellaneous items 

recorded 3337 

Once again an increase in the figures regarding traffic vio- 
lations recorded over 1966 reflect our intention to work harder 
on this problem. 

The "house break" problem continues to plague us. Total 
figures show a drop in the number of breaks in 1967 but an increase 
in the value of lost property. 

Once again I urge all residents to be suspicious of strange 
people and cars in your area and report them to the police immed- 
iately . 

Patrolmen Charles Doyle and Walter Carew are continuing 
their studies in the Law Enforcement Program at Northeastern Univer- 
sity. 

Sergeant Michael McHugh and Patrolman Doyle attended a train- 
ing program in the prevention and control of delinquency given by 
the Massachusetts Division of Youth Service. This program was 
conducted on Wednesdays for 8 weeks at Woburn High School. 

In September, 1968, Patrolman Lawrence Hallett will reach 
compulsory retirement age. 

I am recommending that Patrolman Hallett f s replacement be 
appointed early in 1968 and have further recommended the addition 
of another man to the department. Patrolman Charles Doyle has 
been assigned, on a nearly full-time basis, to work on the house- 
break problem. 



68 



CIVIL DEFENSE 
Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr., Director 



Activity during the year was necessarily along planning lines 
only. However, progress was made in increasing our shelter 
capabilities. Two additional buildings have been licensed and 
marked as fall-out shelters, bringing the total number of build- 
ings licensed to five, with a shelter capacity of 958 persons. 
The only building on the list of those with a shelter qualifica- 
tion which has not been licensed is the Bomb Shelter at Storrow 
House, which has a capacity of 90 persons. This structure is 
presently being used for storage of medical records, and it does 
not appear, at present, as though it will be released for shelter 
purposes in the near future. 

The Federal government has approved the Town's Program Paper 
for the fiscal year 1968; the Town is thus eligible for participa- 
tion in the Federal matching funds and surplus property programs. 

Our radio communications net was tested regularly and funct- 
ioned well, thanks to the faithful performance of Del Keiley and 
John McLellan, who have handled them so capably for many years. 

Plans for 1968 involve such extension of the shelter capabili- 
ties in the Town as may be possible and revision of the current 
Emergency Operations Plan. In addition, we also plan, if funds 
permit, to provide the required two-week fuel supply for the emer- 
gency generator at the Fire and Police Station. This construction 
is eligible for funding under the Federal matching funds program. 

Looking farther ahead, it would seem wise if the Town were to 
provide a measure of emergency power for certain buildings, some 
of which might be those designated as shelters. Such emergency 
power, sufficient to ensure heat and minimal lighting, would ena- 
ble these buildings to be used to shelter those families having 
sick, very old, or very young members in case of such a situation 
as a major power failure. 

The warning system in the Town is susceptible of a good deal 
of improvement. The whistle at the Town Hall is inaudible in 
many parts of Town. These "dead areas" vary depending on wind 
direction. In addition, the system is incapable of sounding the 



69 



prolonged steady blast which is the signal for such a "short fuse" 
disaster as a tornado. The existing whistle should be supple- 
mented by at least two more, one in the northern part of the Town, 
and one in the southern area. Federal funds are available under 
the matching program for such a project. 

As was true a year ago, your Civil Defense program is suffer- 
ing from lack of personnel. We need, particularly, licensed rad- 
io operators, and people to be trained as Shelter Managers and 
Radiological Monitors. 

A serious and effective program of Civil Defense can be of 
great value in case of a natural disaster, and can save an enor- 
mous number of lives which would otherwise be lost in case of a 
nuclear attack. It is this type of program which your Civil 
Defense Agency is working to develop. 



70 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Abigail D. Avery 

Pierre Dreyfus , M. D. 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D. , Chairman 



Over the past year the Board has concerned itself with sta- 
bilizing a number of its activities. A contract has been signed 
with the Emerson Hospital Home Care Service which provides for 
Public Health Nursing Services to the Town of Lincoln. In addi- 
tion to nursing care, this Service now provides consultations by 
a social worker and by a physiotherapist. The charge, which 
may be adjusted, is $6.50 per visit. As described in our 1966 
report, Medicare and Medicaid financial support is given only to 
those nursing services which are supervised. A Federal Grant in 
1966 provided for this supervisor's salary. In the coming years 
the six towns served by the Emerson Hospital Home Care Service 
will finance this item on a per capita basis. Lincoln's share 
presently is approximately 20c per capita. 

Day Nurseries have been placed on a licensed basis. A part- 
time School Nursing Aide has been provided to assist our one 
School Nurse, covering approximately 1100 students. The Board 
has been active in committee with school representatives in set- 
ting up an education program having to do with health of all types 
in the Lincoln schools. 

It is hoped that garbage collection facilities will improve. 
Regulations have been established regarding contaminants in gar- 
bage, and collection of garbage has been placed upon a definite 
annual contractural basis. 

At the present time the Board is actively engaged in updating 
and re-editing its Regulations. Hopefully a concise pamphlet 
describing the Health Regulations and facilities of the Town of 
Lincoln will soon be available at the Town House. 

Various appointments have been made. Mrs. David Garrison 
continues as our Agent; Mr. William Davis, Burial Agent; Dr. Alden 
Russell, Inspector of Slaughtering; and Mr. Philip B. Martin, In- 



71 



spector of Animals. 

Various licenses have been granted. By law, reporting of 
communicable diseases is a responsibility of the householder as 
well as the physician, and these reports should be directed to 
Mrs. Garrison or the Board of Health. The following have been 
reported: chicken-pox, 52; German measles, 2; mumps, 59; strepto- 
coccus sore throat and scarlet fever, 33; measles, 1; salmonello- 
sis, 1; and meningococcus meningitis, 1. The effectiveness of 
modern measles vaccine is well demonstrated in this report. It 
is now a requirement of the Department of Public Health that all 
school children, kindergarten through eighth grade, in attendance 
at public or private schools, must be immunized against small-pox, 
diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, and measles, unless 
exempted for medical or religious reasons. An examination of the 
health records of all children in school is now under way, so 
that we may comply with this regulation. 

A special measles clinic was held in March by the Board of 
Health. The turn-out was small, as most children in the area 
had received vaccine inoculation by private physicians or by Dr. 
John Davies at the Well-Child Conference. 

Other clinics were held. One hundred and nine pre-school 
visits were made by Dr. John Davies at the Well-Child Conference. 
In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, vari- 
ous vaccines were given. In the Fall term, Dr. William Tingey 
screened the entire school in a dental survey. Two hundred and 
thirty children were referred elsewhere for dental treatment or 
orthodontia. This survey clinic is supported by the Pierce Fund. 
No requests were made to the Pierce Fund for financial assistance 
in treatment. The rabies Dog Clinic was held on the first Sat- 

urday in May, as usual. Ninety-one dogs were inoculated with 

modified live Pitman-Moore rabies vaccine. This vaccine is 
effective for two years , hence the number of dogs treated was less 
than in previous years. 

A special Amblyopia Clinic was held at the Hartwell School in 
May for three and four-year olds. Mrs. Garrison was assisted by 
Mrs. David Ammen and Mrs. Richard Austin. Early discovery and 
correction of this vision problem, known as "amblyopia" or "lazy- 
eye", is important in the early school life of these youngsters. 

Finally, the annual tuberculin testing session was conducted 
by Dr. John Sisson. Eighty-four children at the six-year old 



72 



level were tested and there were no positive reactors. 

Again, the Board wishes to thank many volunteers, too numerous 
to mention by name, for their help; and particularly its Agent, 
Mrs. David Garrison, for her concerned activities far beyond the 
line of duty . 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
Leo A. Jeghelian, Director 



The year 1967 saw many changes in the broad field of social 
welfare. Federal Social Security benefits were increased, pov- 
erty programs were expanded and refunded, public assistance pay- 
ments to those in need were increased, and there were sharp rises 
in the costs of medical care due to the adoption by the Common- 
wealth of new and revised fee schedules for the procurement of 
services from hospitals , physicians, dentists, nursing homes, and 
nursing services. 

From the Town's viewpoint the most notable change came with 
retirement in September of Elizabeth Causer, the long-time agent 
and Director of the Department of Public Welfare. The Board, in 
order to insure continuity of payments and services to recipients, 
immediately retained the services of Leo Jeghelian, who is also 
the administrator of the neighboring Nashoba Public Welfare Dis- 
trict, comprising the Towns of Acton, Bedford and Carlisle. 

The following Federal and State subsidized assistance programs 
continued to be available for those in need: 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE : This program pays monthly maintenance 
allowances and provides medical care for individuals 65 years of 
age and over. During the year 1967 an average per month of eight 
cases were aided. 



73 



Total Expenditures $14,330.42 

Federal Share 4,850.00 

State Share 6,625.79 11,475.79 

Net Town Cost $ 2,854.63 

MEDICAL ASSISTANCE or MEDICAID ; This is a recent category 
of aid which provides for medical care for children up to age 
21, those who are permanently and totally disabled between the 
ages of 21 and 64, and individuals 65 and over. 

Eligibility is determined according to State requirements 
governing income, personal property, and other factors. Under 

this program the Department aided an average of 15 individuals 
and 3 families, throughout 1967. 

Total Expenditures $20,723.39 

Federal Share 7,517.31 

State Share 5,888.55 13,405.86 

Net Town Cost $ 7,317.53 

AID TO FAMILIES WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN : A program which 
provides monthly subsistence payments, social services, and medi- 
cal care to families who are deprived of support due to illness, 
death, or other factors. In 1967 there were no expenditures 
under this program. 

DISABILITY ASSISTANCE : A category of aid which allows 
medical care and monthly living allowances to those who are per- 
manently and totally disabled between the ages of 18 and 64. 
There are no 1967 expenditures to be reported under this program. 

GENERAL RELIEF : A State aided program for individuals and 
families not eligible for any other form of assistance. There 
were no expenditures under this program in 1967. 



74 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

Morton B. Braun 
David M. Donaldson 
David L. Garrison 
Richard C. Reece 
Robert L. Allen, Chairman 



This Board determined to do as much actual planning (in con- 
trast to routine "office" business) as possible in 1967. The end 
of the year found it still working towards completion of several 
projects that have been conducted during the Board's usual routine 
of reviewing plans and talking with developers and meeting with 
residents of the Town. 

There were no subdivisions submitted to the Board for action 
in 1967. 

Moderate-Income Housing 

Mindful of the "By '70" statement that Lincoln has a moment 
in time to consider its future, the Planning Board and the Select- 
men created a committee to study the need and potential of moder- 
ate-income housing in Lincoln while land is still available. 
Chaired by Edward Kaelber, the other members of the Committee were: 
George Fernald, Mary Glavine, Huson Jackson, Charles Kindleberger , 
Kemon Taschioglou, R. Langdon Wales and Enid Winchell. 

At mid-year, a change in the Chairman's personal plans re- 
quired him and his family to leave Lincoln and the Boards regret- 
fully accepted his resignation and appointed Huson Jackson as 
Chairman. At present, other members of the Committee are: George 
Fernald, Mary Glavine, Thomas Leggat, Mary McNulty , R. Langdon 
Wales and Enid Winchell. We look forward with anticipation to 
the Committee's final report. 

South Lincoln Shopping Area 

In May, the Planning Board convened a meeting of all property 
owners and tenants in the South Lincoln shopping area, in order to 
review the South Lincoln plan and to elicit ideas concerning the 
future of this part of Town. Later, as a catalyst for its think- 



75 



ing, the Board commissioned a sketch plan of the South Lincoln 
area, in order to establish the relationships between present 
buildings and those that might be constructed later. 

The Planning Board worked closely with the owners of 
Doherty's Garage, to assure that the new filling station in South 
Lincoln would meet with the approval of the Town. A landscape 
architect was retained to plan appropriate screening. The Board 
is grateful to Mr. Doherty for his cooperation. 

Solid Waste Disposal 

Lincoln has joined with Waltham, Weston, Lexington, Concord 
and Bedford to form a Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board. 
Lincoln's representatives are: John Niles , James T. Foust and 
Robert L. Allen. 

Although the Regional Board's first application for planning 
funds was rejected by the Department of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare, the Board is proceeding to develop a program to solve the 
regional refuse problem. It is anticipated that by mid-1968 
the direction of the solution will be known. 

New Zoning Map 

A new zoning map, commissioned by the Planning Board in 1967, 
was completed early in 1968. 

Light Industrial Development 

The Planning Board is determined to do all within its power 
to present to the Town acceptable re-zoning possibilities, to 
change some R-l (single residential) to B-3 (light industrial). 
As soon as the path of the new Route 2 has been definitely set by 
land- taking, the area marked for industrial development in the 
"By '70 Plan" map will receive intensive attention. 

The Board is now proceeding to evaluate potential, and to 
draw up master plans for that part of Lincoln lying north of the 
National Park. A meeting of property owners from that area was 
held with the Board, to establish the Board's interest in develop- 
ing a comprehensive plan for possible light industrial use. The 
Board believes it important to pursue this means of providing 
added tax revenue for the Town. 



76 



"By '70" Plan 

Throughout the year the Board has maintained close liaison 
with the Conservation Commission, and applauds the excellent pro- 
gress it has made toward bringing to completion the land acquisi- 
tion program recommended by the "By '70" Plan. 



We are unanimous in our praise of the efforts of two devoted 
and highly efficient Lincoln employees, without whom our work 
would, stated minimally, falter. With great pleasure we once 
more speak our gratitude to Elizabeth J. Snelling, Planning Board 
secretary, and Warren F. Flint, Executive Secretary of the Town. 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 
Hans Van Leer 
Henry B. Hoover 
James M. J agger 
Robert D. Gordon 

J. Lewis Cunningham, Associate Member 
Robert W. Jevon, Associate Member 



The Board of Appeals holds public hearings and decides on 
the petition of any person believing that he has wrongly been re- 
fused or had revoked a building permit, or any person who finds 
that literal application of the zoning by-law would create a hard- 
ship for him. Requests for special use permits are also heard 
by the Board. Building code questions are decided by the Building 
Code Board of Appeals. 

To grant a variance, the Board must find that the condition 
from which relief is sought is peculiar to the property in ques- 
tion, and not generally characteristic of the area; that the hard- 
ship is substantial; and that granting the desired relief would 
not derogate from the purpose and intent of the zoning by-law. 
Petitioners are advised to present competently prepared plot, top- 
ographic and building plans as necessary to make the specifics of 



77 



their request and the reasons for it perfectly clear. 

Hearings are normally held on the third Thursday of each 
month. Because two weeks notice must be given, anyone wishing 
to present a petition must make his application by the third Mon- 
day preceding the hearing. Notices of hearings appear in the 
legal notice section of the Fence Viewer for the two issues pre- 
ceding the hearing date. 

Only immediate abutters of a property for which a variance 
is asked are notified by mail, so anyone who is interested in 
knowing what questions are coming before the Board in their neigh- 
borhood and the whole Town is advised to spend the few seconds it 
takes to scan the legal notices each week. 

Twelve (12) applications were filed with the Board of Appeals 
in 1967. 

January 19, 1967 - Dr. Zenos Linnell, F. E. Stanley and 

John Caswell , for permission to estab- 
lish two residential lots and one open 
space lot on a four acre parcel of land 
on Beaver Pond Road that had previously 
been divided into four lots. GRANTED. 

Margaret L. Smith , Bedford Road, for a 
variance to establish a lot with front- 
age only on a right-of-way. Post- 
poned at request of petitioner. 

February 16, 1967 - (Adjourned to February 23, 1967) - 

Frank M. and Ruth B. Housman , to vary 
side yard requirements for Lot 2-A, 
Fox Run Road, in an R-l Single Resi- 
dence zone in order to legalize loca- 
tion of house on lot. GRANTED. 

May 18, 1967 - Joseph L. Bower , to reduce requirement 

of Section V, B-5 of the Zoning By-Law 
for a minimum side yard from fifty (50) 
feet to thirty (30) feet of lot on 
southwest side of Baker Bridge Road. 
Variance GRANTED, but, at request of 
petitioner, RESCINDED on November 17, 
1967. 



78 



Fred J. and Eleanor M. Wilfert , for a 
variance to permit building a house on 
a lot on Old Sudbury Road thirty (30) 
feet from the side lot line, forty (40) 
feet from the street, and having a 
distance through the house from side 
lot line to side lot line of two hun- 
dred ten (210) feet. GRANTED. 



June 15, 1967 



Peter A. Thomas , Tower Road, for per- 
mission to construct a garage within 
six (6) feet of the side lot line. 
GRANTED. 



August 17, 1967 



W. Robert Pearmain for Dr. Richard S 



Morgan and Alvin Taub , to vary pro- 
visions of the zoning by-law with re- 
gard to side lot line requirements at 
Lot 10, Laurel Drive. GRANTED. 



September 21, 1967 



August Schumacher , for permission to 
reduce the frontage of an established 
non- conforming lot on Lincoln Road by 
twenty-five (25) feet in order to in- 
crease the total frontage of his ad- 
joining land in Way land. GRANTED. 



October 19, 1967 



Walter J. Salmon , Winter Street, for < 
variance to allow the construction of 
an addition to his house extending to 
within fifteen (15) feet of the side 
lot line. GRANTED. 



November 16, 1967 



Robert A. Lemire , Codman Road, for a 
variance from the side yard require- 
ments to permit construction of an 
addition to his house. GRANTED. 



Henry M. Merrill , Old County Road, for 
a variance from the front yard require- 
ments to permit construction of an at- 
tached garage. GRANTED. 



Lewis Street Realty Trust , for a vari- 
ance to permit increasing the extent 



79 



of an existing n on- conforming use by 
adding a third apartment in the store 
and apartment building at the corner 
of Lewis Street and Lincoln Road. 
POSTPONED indefinitely at request of 
petitioner. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Alan McClennen, Chairman 
Stuart B. Avery, Jr. 
John B. Larson 



The Board was organized on April 1 with the election of 
Mr. McClennen as chairman, and it was agreed that the Town should 
be aware of the significant contribution which has been made to 
the Town by three-term Board member and long time chairman, Russell 
P. Mahan. 

The year has been marked by some physical improvements and 
some organizational changes, along with routine operations. 

Organizationally we have now firmly joined with the other 
public works functions of the Town. The Public Works Administra- 
tor has full jurisdiction and responsibility for Water Department 
operations under the Commissioners. The shift of equipment and 
manpower back and forth has worked satisfactorily, and with more 
experience will work better. The significance of this new system 
was brought unhappily home to the Commissioners when John Gilbert 
injured his back in September. Without the availability of the 
Administrator, the Commissioners would have been in an awkward 
position. Fortunately, at year's end, John Gilbert is better, but 
regrettably still unable to give all his former energy to the op- 
eration of the department. 

The physical plant has been improved by the replacement of 
the six-inch water main on Trapelo Road from the Center to Lexing- 
ton Road with about 1250 feet of ten- inch cement asbestos pipe. 
This work, while not essential, fitted in with the need to repave 
the street. Not previously planned was the replacement of the 

80 



four-inch main with about 50 feet of eight-inch cement asbestos 
pipe from near Lawson's stand across Route 2 to the Far ring ton 
driveway. This occurred because for the first time in years the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works allowed local communi- 
ties to cut the pavement for utility replacements since they were 
going to repave the road anyway. 

Related to this improvement were negotiations between the 
Commissioners and Farrington Memorial and Mr. Edgar Moor of Tabor 
Hill Road to provide rights-of-way for a pipe connecting Tabor 
Hill Road main to the Farrington Memorial main. As the system 
is laid out today, a break in the Lexington Road main east of 
Trapelo Road or one in the Trapelo Road main east of Silver Hill 
Road would stop service to a sizeable number of customers. The 
suggested Tabor Hill- Farrington link would remove this risk. 

The week before Christmas saw the cutting in of the new 
electric motor at the Tower Road well. This substantially com- 
pletes this project. 

There have been a limited number of operational problems 
during the year. In the spring and in August algae developed 
in the Bedford Road pressure reservoir causing unpleasant taste. 
Modest treatment with copper sulphate cleared it up quickly. 

1967 saw a delightful restoration of water levels in Sandy 
Pond. On January 1 the water stood at minus 5 feet, or down 
about 6 1/2 feet from the surcharge level. On July 10 it stood 
at minus 2 inches. During that period almost all water was 
pumped from the well. Only on days when the gas engine was shut 
down was water taken from Sandy. By September 9 the level was 
down 6 1/4 inches and by December 2 it had gone down to almost one 
foot. During the fall water was taken entirely from Sandy Pond 
due to the conversion work at the well. With ample rain in 
December and no evaporation, the level again rose to about minus 
5 inches. Given no pumping from the Pond, it should fill up by 
spring. Precipitation in Boston in 1967 was about 47.20 inches - 
4.55 inches above normal. 

In spite of this the Commissioners have continued to explore 
for additional sources. Combining this concept with the need to 
provide a second connection to North Lincoln, it "hangs" on a 
single main from the Center. Seismic tests were made north of 
Sandy Pond. While the official report is not complete, conditions 
there do not appear to be favorable. In 1968 negotiations will 
be started with property owners near Farrar Pond in the belief 



81 



that water bearing soils can be found. While construction of a 
well may not be necessary for some time, land acquisition would 
seem to be wise. 

The North Lincoln connection problem will be pursued in 
1968 regardless of the failure to find water. 

1967 also saw the first data processed billing operation. 
By contracting for this service it is expected that there will be 
substantially less work at the Town Hall and the billing results 
are much more accessible on a printout. The first printout 
helped the Commissioners to better understand the system and the 
impact of any changes that might be considered. 



WATER DEPARTMENT STATISTICS FOR 
1967 



Pipe in use (miles) 
Hydrants in use 
Gates in use 
Blow-offs in use 
Pressure (P. S. I.) 
Volume pumped (gallons) 
Services added 
Services renewed 
Services in use 
Meters in use 



35.55 
308 
353 
27 
40-100 
127,194,700 
22 
5 
1186 
1163 



82 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Quincy Adams 

Paul Brooks 

James DeNormandie 

Edith M. Henderson 

Walter Van Dorn 

Hans Van Leer 

Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 



We are pleased to report substantial progress towards achieve- 
ment of Lincoln 1 s By- 70 Program. At the March, 1967, Meeting, 
$30,000 was voted into the Stabilization Fund for future land 
acquisition. In the course of the year $71,287.50 was received 
from State and Federal agencies in aid for earlier acquisitions 
as follows : 

Federal State Total 

DiPerna 

Lincolnsfield 

Tarbell 

Warren 

Browning 



$ 8,700 




12,250 


$ 6,125 


15,000 


7,500 




5,000 




16,712.50 



$35,950 $35,337.50 $71,287.50 

In addition, Federal applications were completed for $43,425 
in aid on Warren and Browning. It is hoped that these projects 

will be funded in 1968. 

We are particularly pleased to report two gifts of lovely 
land that fit nicely in the open space area emerging in the Brown- 
ing Fields area. Mrs. Marsena F. Butts and the Paul Brooks 
family have made gifts of two and four acres respectively for 
which we are most grateful. 

The above represent the more tangible results of our 1967 
activities. In addition, the Commission began a program of 

land surveillance, maintenance and usage control. Browning 

fields were mowed and made available to the Lincoln 4-H Horse 
Club. As additional tracts are preserved, it is expected that 
the Commission will have to devote considerable effort to this 
aspect of its responsibilities. In similar regard, we are work- 

ing with the Town's Recreation Committee in its search for suita- 



83 



ble swimming and other recreational facilities. 

To gain broader perspective and coverage in some of the 
large conservation projects confronting the Town, the following 
individuals were invited to serve as Conservation Associates: 

Mrs. Ruth Burke Mr. David Garrison 

Mrs. Jane Butler Mr. William Preston 

Mrs. Lucretia Hoover Mr. John Stevenson 

Mr. Kenneth Bergen Mr. Frederick Walkey 
Mr. William Drury 

Finally, we want to alert the Town to the near term likeli- 
hood of an article on its Open Space Program in Reader's Digest . 
Lincoln, as an example of a small town, and Seattle, as a city, 
were selected as subjects of an article on what can be done to 
preserve the essential character of local natural beauty. 

In closing, we want to assure the Town that forward momentum 
in carrying out the By-70 Program continues strong. We hope and 
trust that our planning efforts will prove adequate to the de- 
cision-making that lies just ahead. 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Bradford Cannon 

Donald P. Donaldson, Treasurer 

Jeanne Healey, Secretary 

Edith M. Henderson 

Henry P. Outten 

Constantin A. Pertzoff 

William M. Preston, Chairman 



The Lincoln Land Conservation Trust is a non-profit organi- 
zation supported by membership dues and voluntary contributions 
whose principal purpose is to preserve the open space character 
of the Town. We cooperate closely with the Town Conservation 
Commission. 

During the past year we received as a gift from Mr. and Mrs. 

84 



Constantin A. Pertzoff an important tract of 5.7 acres of land 
east of Twin Ponds. We continue to add to our system of trails 
for walking and riding. A new trail map has been prepared and 
will be available early in 1968. 

The annual meeting of the Trust was held on May 25, 1967, at 
the Drumlin Farm Nature Center. Mr. Henry Out ten was elected 
and Mr. Pertzoff and Mr. Donaldson were re-elected for three year 
terms as trustees. 

The following is the report of the Treasurer for 196 7: 



On hand January 1: 
General funds 
Brooks fund 

Receipts : 

Membership dues 
Cash gifts 
Brooks fund 



Expenditures : 

Middlesex Institution for 



$6,908.08 
3,518.57 



2,076.00 
275.00 
174.70 



$10,426.65 



2,525.70 
$12,952.35 



Savings - mortgage prin 


cipal 


6 


,000.00 




Mortgage interest 




330.00 




Printing and mailing 






167.91 




Recording fees 






20.50 




Pine seedlings 






20.00 


6,538.41 


On hand December 31, 1967 










General funds 




2 


,720.67 




Brooks fund 




3 


,693.27 





$6,413.94 



85 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, WIRING AND PLUMBING 

Ernest L. Johnson, Building Inspector 
Daniel J. Murphy, Plumbing Inspector 
William M. Dean, Wiring Inspector 



Building Permits issued in 1967: 

New residential 21 

Residential garages 7 

G re enh ous es 2 

Tennis courts 2 

Stable 1 

Additions , alterations , 

etc. 43 

Re- is sue 2 

Swimming pools 9 

Non- residential garage 1 

FEES: 



88 



$1,432.25 



Plumbing Permits issued in 1967 
FEES: 



70 
$ 503.00 



Wiring Permits issued in 1967: 
FEES: 



167 
$ 928.15 



86 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Frank H. Cande, Administrator 



ADMINISTRATION 

The Public Works Department is fully integrated with six 
divisions: Equipment Maintenance, Cemeteries, Parks, Highways, 
Water and Sanitary Land Fill. 

The Department is changing rapidly from strictly a maintenance 
type to a construction-maintenance type. As this proceeds, the 
need for trained personnel becomes more acute. 

At present there is a staff of twelve to service the Town's 
needs. This includes a part-time student and myself. An on- 
the-job training program is under way. 

During 1967 there were several changes made in personnel. 
Thomas Williamson was transferred to the sanitary land fill opera- 
tion and did a remarkable job in getting this program going. How- 
ever, he chose to return to school in September. Frank Gilbert, 
who assisted us in the water and highway divisions, was trans- 
ferred to sanitary land fill. Under conditions other than agree- 
able during December, he too is doing a fine job. Both of the 
men learned to operate a shovel dozer. Jim Neville, formerly of 
Lincoln, now a resident of Boxboro, came to the Department on May 
1 and is spending 50% of his time learning the "ins" and "outs" of 
the Water Division. Jim replaces Ken Jones who was called into 
the service last February. 

Our analysis of jobs, both routine and planned projects, is 
beginning to pay off in the better utilization of time and man- 
power. By the end of 1968 we should be able to forecast the com- 
pletion of our planned work load and manpower needs more closely. 

The use of our engineering equipment again is keeping our con- 
sulting engineering cost down. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

A sound program of preventive maintenance again has helped us 
through some trying times. The Town mechanic, Roland Polhamus , 



87 



has done a splendid job of keeping costs down for outside repairs 
by fixing small troubles before they became large ones. The keep- 
ing of spare parts on hand of breakable items has kept breakdown 
time to a minimum. At present he is caring for twenty-seven Town 
owned registered vehicles and equipment, three unregistered pieces 
of motorized equipment, ten pieces of specialized equipment and 
nine snow plows. 

CEMETERIES 



With the heavy work load in the Highway Division, the Ceme- 
teries received the minimum in maintenance and improvement. With 
the exceptional growing season for grass, we were able to keep all 
cemeteries respectably mowed and trimmed. The riding mower again 
proved its value and with the addition of electric trimmers, the 
grass next to the stone markers was kept cut in half the time it 
took during 1966. With the heavy work load we did manage to clean 
up the leaves before snow came. With grass cutting and trimming, 
the sweeping of cemetery roads and interment openings all mechan- 
ized, the laborious hand raking and leaf collection should also 
be mechanized. Lot markers staked during 1966 were set and the 
balance is planned for setting this year. 

PARK DIVISION 

Custom contracting of our school and park grounds was con- 
tinued as it has been in the past years. 

A new back stop for baseball was erected at the DiPerna proper- 
ty. The improvement of ball diamonds was taken care of prior to 
the playing season as well as the setting of bleachers at the 
school complex. 

The park between Ridge Road and the shopping area was graded 
and planted with trees. 

All the elms and oaks in the parks and along our roads received 
a spraying for control of Dutch Elm disease and the oak leaf skele- 
tonizer. 

HIGHWAYS DIVISION 

Other than sweeping, patching, line marking, general clean up 
of our streets, the majority of the year's time was devoted to the 
building of the bicycle path. This path proved a real challenge 

88 



to us all. It is 90% completed, and even at this time it has 
been very beneficial to the safety of Lincoln Road, as well as an 
aes th e t i c imp r ovemen t . 

Lincoln Road received a new surface after some improvements 
were made in re- alignment. 






The Chapter 90 maintenance funds were used to resurface a 
portion of Trapelo Road, Bedford Road, South Great Road and Con- 
cord Road. 

Oil treatment was done on Bedford Lane, Old Concord Road and 
lower Lincoln Road. 

SANITARY LAND FILL DIVISION 

The newest addition to the Public Works Department was the 
sanitary land fill. April 1, just eleven days after the Town 
Meeting voted approval, it was put into operation. 

Having started on a "shoestring" and with very little knowledge 
of the operation of such a system, we have come through with very 
few difficulties. The citizens have been most cooperative in fol- 
lowing the rules laid down. 

WATER DIVISION 

Most of the information relative to the water supply and dis- 
tribution will be found in the Water Commissioners' report. Other 
than that, the updating of records and pooling of manpower and 
equipment has reduced some of the cost for custom services. 

SNOW REMOVAL 

1967 went down in history as the year of snow and rain. The 
cost for snow removal was up due to the number and intensity of 
the storms. Equipment breakdowns were held to a minimum. How- 
ever, with another year's use of heavy service, some replacement 
of snow fighting equipment is necessary. 

In conclusion I want to thank all Boards, Committees and De- 
partments again for having the opportunity to cooperate with them. 



89 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Robert A. Spence, Chairman 
James DeNormandie 
H. Arnold MacLean 



Additional bounds have been set in the new section. It is 
planned that this section will be available in 1968. 

Routine maintenance was performed during the year. 

There were 22 interments in 1967. 

The Commissioners wish to express their appreciation for the 
assistance and co-operation given them by officers and employees 
of the Town during the past year. 



90 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Edwin M. Cole Life Member 

Martha DeNormandie Life Member 

Morley M. John Life Member 

John A. Carley School Committee Appointee 

Francis H. Gleason Selectmen Appointee 

Albert L. Fullerton Elected by the Town 



Once again the Lincoln Public Library is gratified to report 
that its circulation has exceeded that of previous years and 
reached an all time high. This steady and persistent growth 
seems to indicate satisfaction on the part of those who have used 
the Library over the years as well as of newcomers to Lincoln and 
to Lincoln's library. 

There have been some changes in the staff this past year. 
Mrs. Maryalice Thoma has returned to her position as head librarian 
on a full time basis and continues to be ably supported by Mrs. 
Donald P. Donaldson and Mrs. Howard C. Kent. The Trustees are 
pleased to report that Mrs. Kent was invited to serve on the Execu- 
tive Advisory Board of the Round Table of Children's Librarians of 
Massachusetts . 

Mrs. Philip T. Cate, Jr., and Mrs. Harry R. Healey , Jr., both 
associated with the Library for several years, resigned from the 
staff, and Mrs. John W. Irwin and Mrs. Daniel Zeising have become 
full time staff members. Mrs. Zeising, formerly Sandra MacFarland, 
began working in the Library when she was a freshman in the Region- 
al High School. She will receive a degree in Library Science in 
1968. 

The Trustees feel that the atmosphere created by the Library 
staff of warmth and relaxation combined with efficiency accounts in 
great measure for the growth in Library circulation. 

The volunteer programs of the Library have again been of 
great value to the daily running of the Library. 27 young people 
referred to as PITS (pages in training) gave approximately 57 hours 
a week in the children's room signing out and shelving books. 23 
adult volunteers under the direction of Mrs. Edward Rawson gave 2 
to 5 hours a week filing, working at the circulation desk, shelf 
reading and processing new books. 



91 



In addition, 7 high school students work as pages in the 
Library, serving regular hours for remuneration. They are com- 
petent workers and have been well-trained by Mrs. Kent and Mrs. 
Donaldson. 

In April, National Library Week was celebrated by a program 
in the Library featuring a talk by Professor John Mathews of Bran- 
deis University on playwriting and rewriting. National Child- 
ren's Book Week was commemorated in November by an amusing presen- 
tation of a shadow play acted by the PITS and Pages. A diorama 
made by the children was also on display. 

By way of expanding Library services, some discarded books 
have been placed in the Concord Reformatory. Patients at Storrow 
House have been invited to use the Library and are doing so. 
Books which could not be sent to Laurel, Mississippi, have been 
given to Mr. J. Marcus Mitchell, Curator of the Negro History Museum 
and Negro Art Museum of Boston. Some of these books now form the 
nucleus of a small library in the History Museum, while others 
have been placed in clubs, stores and homes in the Roxbury area 
where they are circulated on a neighborhood basis. 

Over the past twenty years, both the circulation of books and 
the number of members of the Library have grown at a much faster 
rate than Lincoln's population. The addition to the building in 
1959 provided space for books and for readers which was immediately 
needed, and also included an unfinished room for future needs. 
Now, with many stacks filled to nearly 100% of capacity, and with 
crowding a problem particularly in the Children's Room, the time 
has come to open up more space. Under an article passed at the 
Special Town Meeting in June, 1967, the Trustees were empowered to 
hire a consultant and an architect to draw up preliminary plans 
for increasing the usable space in the Library. 

Mr. Sidney Smith, director of the Boston Center for Adult 
Education and former director of the libraries of the Universities 
of Illinois and Vermont, was hired as consultant. 

Mr. Robert Brannen of Lincoln was hired as architect. Mr. 
Brannen has worked in the field of library design and also served 
as the architect for the recent renovation of the White Church. 

A careful study of present and future functions and needs of 
the Library was made by the Library staff, the consultant, the 
Trustees and the architect. This study serves as the basis of pre- 



92 



liminary plans for renovation and development to be presented to 
the Town Meeting. 

The Trustees have welcomed the very regular attendance at 
their meetings of a representative of the League of Women Voters, 
Mrs. Vernon Turner. They remind all Lincoln residents that their 
meetings are open, a notice being posted each time at the Town 
Hall. 



Mrs. 


Herbert N. Aptekar 


Mrs . v 


Mrs . 


James Austin 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Arthur Bergles 


Miss 


Mrs. 


Barry Bigelow 


Mrs. ! 


Mrs. 


Charles Bliss 


Mrs. 1 


Mrs. 


William H. Butler 


Mrs . i 


Mrs. 


Thomas P. Cope 


Mrs. ] 


Mrs. 


Robert Emerson 


Mrs. . 


Mrs. 


W. Harrison Faulkner 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Melvyn Harris 


Mrs. . 


Mrs . 


Stephen Herthel 


Mrs. i 


Mrs. 


Leon Hester 


Mrs. ] 


Mrs. 


Henry Hoover 


Mrs. ( 


Mrs. 


John Irwin 


Mrs. 1 


Mrs . 


R. Bruce King 


Mrs. \ 


Mrs. 


James Lampert 


Mrs. I 


Lincoln Boy Scouts 


Mrs. ( 


Mrs. 


Paul Marsh 


Mrs. ' 


Mrs. 


Donald Millard 





Joseph Newell 
Foster Nystrom 
Isabel Peirce 
Sholem Postel 
Edward Raws on 
Alfred Rogers 
Ralph Ruocco 
James Russell 
Charles Stevens 
J. Hardy Stewart 
Arthur Thiessen 
Richard Thorpe 
Quincy Wales 
R. Langdon Wales 
Winthrop B. Walker 
Henry Warner 
George Wells 
Thomas Worthington 



JUNIOR VOLUNTEERS 
(Pages-in- training, P.I.T.S.) 



Deborah Butler 
Fred Caswell 
Deborah Clark 
Happy Clark 
Cynthia Doherty 
Sherry Doherty 
Eunice Ferguson 
Kris tine Fernald 



Audrey Kessel 
Richard King 
George Loewenstein 
Cynthia Mason 
Jeanmarie Murphy 
Petrina Petritis 
Margaret Raws on 
Sarah Reece 



93 



Twila Field 
Arlo Frost 
Julie Glass 
Timothy Hester 
Thomas Jevon 
Judy Johnson 



Carol Roehr 
Anne Rose 
Mary Row 
Leigh Russell 
Joan Salmon 
Carolyn Taylor 



LIBRARY DONORS, 1967 



Mrs. Archibald W. Adkins 

Mrs. Robert Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Anderson 

Mrs. James Austin 

Mrs. Richard Austin 

Mrs . John Barnaby 

Mrs. Calvin P. Bartlett 

Mr. Eliot Bartlett 

Mr. Thomas P. Beal 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Bradley 

Mrs. Paul Brooks 

Mrs. Marjorie C. Burgess 

Mrs. Roger Burke 

Cambridge Supper Club 

Dr. and Mrs. Bradford Cannon 

Mr. John A. Carley 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Casner 

Mrs. John R. Caswell 

Mrs. Philip Cate 

Mrs. Elizabeth Causer 

Mrs. Stewart Coffin 

Dr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Cole 

Concord Co-operative Bank 

Mr. Henry Coolidge 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Cope 

Mr. and Mrs. Addison Cowles 

Mr. Bruce Daniels 

Mrs. Dana H. Dickey 

Mrs. Donald P. Donaldson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Donaldson 

Mrs. Daniel E. Dust in 

Mr. Jefferson Eaton 

Mr. Richard Eaton 

Mrs. Dean S. Edmonds 

Mrs. Robert Emerson 



Mrs . 
Mrs . 



Mr. 
Mrs 

Mr. 
Mrs 
Mrs 



Mr . and Mrs . Henry B . Kane 
Miss M. Gertrude Kelley 

Charles Kindleberger 

Charles Kubik 
Mrs. William Langton 
Mrs. Jerome Lavine 
Mrs. Shih Ying Lee 
Mrs . John Lincoln 
Lincoln Garden Club 
Lincoln League of Women Voters 
Mrs. John D. Little 
Mrs . John Loud 
Ludwig Luft 

John Lummus 
James B. Mar 

Robert F. Maroni 

Paul Marsh 
Mr. Hay den Mason 
Mrs. William McKennan 
Mr. Philip Meriam 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Meriam 
Mrs. Thomas Morse 
Mrs . Mark Naiman 
Mrs. Roger S. Payne 
Mr. Theodore S. Polumbaum 
Mrs. William Preston 
Prudential Committee, First 

Parish in Lincoln 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. W. Richardson 
Mr. Laurence Richardson 
Mrs. Wyman Richardson 
Rev. and Mrs. Morris R. Robinson 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rugo 
Mrs. Charles N. Satterfield 
Mr. Clement C. Saw tell 



94 



Mr. and Mrs. A. Bradlee Emmons Mr. 

Mrs. Albert C. England Mr. 

Miss Olive Floyd Mrs 

4-H Club of Lincoln Mrs 

Miss Norma Fryatt Mr. 

Mr. Albert Fullerton Mr. 

Mrs. David Garrison Mrs 

Mrs. Katharine Goodman Mrs 

Mrs. Constance Haden Mr. 

Mr. Whitney Haley Mrs 

Mrs. Norman Hapgood Mr. 

Mrs. Melvyn Harris Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Healey Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. Eliot Hubbard Mrs 

Mr. Christopher Hurd Mrs 

Mrs. Nancy Dabney Hurd Mr. 

Mrs. Allen W. Jackson Mrs 

Mrs. Charles Jenney Mr. 

Mrs. DeWitt John Mrs 



William D. Sawtell 
and Mrs. Alan Sloan 

Jeanne Healey Smith 

Frances Sturgis 
George G. Tarbell 
and Mrs. F. B. Taylor 

Stanley Tead 

Irving Telling 
and Mrs. Arthur Thiessen 

Maryalice Thoma 
Eveleth R. Todd 

Herbert Torode 

Raymond Tunnell 

Quincy Wales 

Winthrop Walker 
and Mrs . Henry Warner 

John B. Warner 
George Wells 

Stanley S. Wirsig 



95 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Hours open: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 8:30 

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 10:30 to 5:00 



Closed legal holidays and 
Saturdays in July and August 



STATISTICS, 1967 

January 1 - December 31, 1967 



General 



New members 
Total membership 

Amount of fines collected 

Number of days open 



316 
3,297 

$2,236.33 

289 



Acquisitions 



Books purchased 
Books received by gift 
Total acquisitions, 1967 
Inventory, 1966 

Books discarded or lost 
Inventory, 1967 



2,840 
376 

3,216 
27,398 
30,614 

1,601 
29,013 



Records : 
Inventory 
Purchases 
Gifts 



1966 



Discarded or lost 
Inventory, 1967 



670 
39 
40 



749 
19 



730 



Circulation 



Adult non-fiction 

Adult fiction 

Periodicals 

Records 

Inter-library loan 

Juvenile 

Total 1967 circulation 



17,306 

17,783 

1,950 

2,094 

241 

34,895 

74,269 



96 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Mary Jane Butler, Co-Chairman 

John P. Stevenson, Co-Chairman 

Barbara B. Leggat, Secretary 

George C. Hibben, Treasurer 

Donna G. Burt 

Nancy G. Butler 

Gwendolyn G. desCognets 

Myrna G. Ehrenfeld 

Walter Keyes 

Rhoda K. Taschioglou 

Frederick P. Walkey 

Representatives to the Committee December 31, 1967 

Jefferson T. Eaton - Tennis 

Mrs. Martin Ernst - Bowling 

Mrs. Alfons Jozwicki - Golf 

Mrs. Cyrus Kano - Bicycle Safety Program 

Mr. & Mrs. John McLean - Badminton 

Mrs. Robert Whatley - Ladies' Softball 

Mr. Lawrence Zuelke - Aquatics Study Committee 

Mrs. Thomas Belleau ) 

Dr. Melvyn Harris ) Summer Playground 

Mrs. Robert Lenington ) 

Mr. Arthur Tetreault ) 



The Recreation Committee serves in an advisory capacity to 
the Selectmen and coordinates and supervises recreational programs 
for the Town. Programs currently sponsored by the Committee in- 
clude: Bowling; Skating; Skiing; Golf; Badminton; Basketball; 
Ladies' Softball; Tennis; Summer Playground; and Bicycle Safety. 

Bowling. A group of sixteen Junior High school boys and 
girls participated in a Bowling instruction program Wednesday 
afternoons from 1:30 to 4:15 p.m. during April and May. The acti- 
vity was organized and administered by Mrs. Martin Ernst, and in- 
structed by Mrs. Mills of the Wal-Lex Bowling Alley in Waltham. 
Each student paid a fee of $4.00, which covered the cost of three 
strings and shoe rental for each of the five sessions; thus the 
activity was self supporting. 



97 



Skating. During the skating season the front pond in 
Pierce Park was available to all for general skating and the flood 
lights were on until 10 p.m. Hockey sticks were not allowed on 
this pond; the back pond, which does not yet have lights, was re- 
served for hockey. 

Both ponds were checked daily by the Police Department, and 
signs were posted to indicate conditions. 

Badminton. The badminton group, again administered by Mr. 
and Mrs. John McLean, played every Tuesday evening from 7:30 to 
10 p.m. in the Smith School Gym. Rackets and birdies were pro- 
vided; players' weekly contribution of fifty cents covered these 
cos ts . 

Basketball , managed and coached by Walter Keyes , assisted by 
his son Andy, was offered to boys in fifth through twelfth grades 
on Saturday, and to men on Monday evenings. Outside games with 
Hanscom School in Bedford were scheduled for the boys. Approxi- 
mately 90 boys and 15 men participated each week. If assistance 
from several more adults could be obtained in supervising the 
Saturday groups, the program offering could be expanded. 

Golf. The popular golf program of six consecutive indoor 
group lessons for beginners and for intermediate-advanced golfers 
was again conducted on Thursday evenings from March 9 to April 13 
in the Smith School Gym. For the second year the group was in- 
structed by Mr. John Thoren, golf pro at the Myopia Hunt Club, and 
administered by Mrs. Alfons Jozwicki. 

Softball. A group averaging ten women played ladies' soft- 
ball on Tuesday mornings from 9:30 to 11:30 for eight weeks during 
the spring. Babysitting service, paid for by the participant 
mothers, was provided. The activity was administered by Mrs. 
Robert Whatley. 

Tennis. Tennis in Lincoln in 1967 again was enthusiastic 
and varied, involving several hundred residents of all ages. The 
organized programs were smoothly administered by Jeff Eaton. 

Spencer Martin captained a Lincoln entry in the Mens' Suburban 
Tennis League, competition starting in April. Several Womens ' 
teams, organized by Mrs. Pierre Dreyfus and others, played spirited 
tennis in other Greater Boston communities through mid- June with 
the Ladies' Suburban League. 



98 



Elementary school children poured onto the Town's four pub- 
lic courts at many a recess, and there was an ample spillage of 
enthusiasm into the July Playground instruction program, which 
was ably coached by Brookline's James Freedman with the assistance 
of Christy Stanley and the organizational skills of Mrs. Louis Far- 
ley. A Summer Boys' League and Girls' Junior Wightman Cup, cata- 
lyzed by Mrs. Robert Niles, Mrs. A. Bradlee Emmons, and others; 
two teen-age tournaments, helped along by John Ingard; and a 
Fourth of July Round Robin Tournament run with the aid of Dr. 
Charles Keevil and Mrs. George Roehr rounded out the organized as- 
pects of summer tennis. The Annual Fall Tournament, directed by 
Robert Leaver, closed out the season by Columbus Day, with Dr. 
Charles Keevil and Mrs. George Roehr emerging as champions in 
Mens' and W omens ' Singles. 

Once again volunteers played an essential role in Lincoln's 
tennis program. Without doubt the least noticed but most import- 
ant volunteers were those who gave unflagging care and devotion to 
the huge job of maintenance. Double the number of volunteers must 
be found in 1968 or the quality of the Town's superb (and expen- 
sive) Standard Green courts could become seriously jeopardized. 
With great regret, the Tennis Committee has accepted the resigna- 
tion of Frederick Walkey , for years the motivating force behind un- 
sung teams of weeders , resurf acers , waterers and rollers It 

has been many nights for many a year that Fred could be found .... 

11 p.m rearranging sprinklers, spreading 'calcium', replacing 

tapes, so that someone else could enjoy the courts on the follow- 
ing day. Your services are needed . 

Swimming . For the second consecutive year there was no 
swimming instruction offered as part of the Summer Recreation Pro- 
gram. Unfortunately, a suitable site does not seem to be avail- 
able to the Town for this vital program. 

Bicycle Safety Program. A bicycle safety program was held 
September 8-16 with the cooperation of the Lincoln Schools and a 
large number of parent and high school volunteers. Financial sup- 
port was provided by the LSA and the Lincoln 4-H Clubs . 

Late in August a letter was mailed to parents describing the 
program and its objectives. On Friday, September 8, a program of 
the week's events was handed out at the schools, together with a 
safety pamphlet entitled "Fun on a Bike". On Saturday an in- 
spection team of parents and high school students was set up under 
the direction of Macone's Store in Concord, and safe bikes were 
awarded a reflector tape. At the same time a bicycle safety film 



99 



was shown continuously at Hartwell and safe riding practices were 
taught to Hartwell children under the direction of Mrs. Torode. 

During the week following school sports programs for Smith 
and Brooks School students featured safe cycling, with parents 
assisting the physical education staff. Officer Charles E. 
Feeley of Newton spoke on bicycle safety at assemblies for Smith 
and Brooks; Sgt. James F. Hanley of Concord spoke at the Hartwell 
as s emb ly . 

The following Saturday there were seven picnic bike trips, 
with families invited, ranging in difficulty from Pierce Park for 
5- and 6-year olds to Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High for eighth 
graders. Officer Feeley conducted a brief orientation for parent 
leaders just before the trips. High schoolers enjoyed a trip to 
the Youth Hostel in Harvard on the preceding weekend. 183 child- 
ren and 33 adults participated in the trips. 

The program was coordinated by Mrs. Cyrus Kano. 

Ski School. Blue and white "Lincoln Ski School" emblems 
were presented to all who registered for Ski School in January, 
196 7. Afternoon and evening showings of two ski films provided 
tips on ski safety and the American ski technique. Local snow 
conditions were poor due to an extensive January thaw but three 
Wednesday afternoons of instruction were eventually conducted, 
followed by an afternoon of informal competition where all parti- 
cipants received a prize. 

Ski School was directed by Mrs. Christopher Van Curran and 
Mrs. Eugene Roberts of Way land, and coordinated by Mrs. William B. 
Butler. Junior High students augmented the two dozen adult teach- 
ers. Mrs. A. P. Priest conducted a separate slalom class offered 
to the most proficient skiers, in Waltham. 

Summer Playground. The unexpected extension of school into 
the fourth week of June resulted in the reduction of the 1967 Sum- 
mer Playground from a five- to a four-week program. 

Administrative Director William Mietzner, returning for a 
second year, was assisted by Program Director Edward Abell, and by 
Shop Director Donald Ekengren, who returned for a third summer in 
Lincoln. 

Playground Counselors included Harriet Fulton Fisher, John 
and Nancy Van Natta, Beverly Lord, Sue Haskell, Janet Chisholm, 

100 



Joshua Cutler and Nancy Brown. Arts and Crafts specialist was 
Jan Brown, with Nancy Van Natta. High school students serving 
as Program Aide Trainees were Laura Keyes , Doug Foust, Pattie 
Dean, Priscilla Hopkins, Larry Page, Eva-Lisa Lauren, and second 
year veteran Pam Jeffery. 

Activities of the Summer Playground followed a day-camp 
routine. The morning opened with an assembly program including 
flag raising. Youngsters brought lunch, except kindergarteners, 
who attended half days only. Children were grouped according to 
age; each age group had its own counselors and scheduled activi- 
ties. Special electives during the afternoon gave the program 
flexibility and allowed each child to develop his own interests. 

"Doc" Abell's baseball team scheduled out-of-town games on 
many occasions, and took advantage of swimming available in other 
communities. Thanks are due to cooperative parents who assisted 
with transportation. 

The Shop Program offered electronics, metalworking, and wood- 
working; the courses were oversubscribed. 

Summer Playground Committee members Mrs. William Burt, Mrs. 
William B. Butler, Mrs. Robert Lenington, Mrs. Thomas Belleau, Dr. 
Melvyn Harris, and Mr. Arthur Tetreault contributed large amounts 
of time and effort to ensure the success of the program. Numerous 
spring evenings were spent by Committee members interviewing and 
hiring Playground staff and P.A.T.S. During the summer they 
assisted the Administrative and Program Directors with administra- 
tive details and, at the end of the season, they were co-hosts with 
the Playground staff to 250 parents and children at an evening 
Steak Barbecue. 

League of Women Voters Study Committee. "Recreation" is the 
subject of the Local Item under study by the Lincoln League of 
Women Voters in 1967-68. A fruitful interchange of ideas should 
prove beneficial to the Recreation Committee, the Town, and the 
League. Mrs. William H. Butler, a Recreation Committee member, is 
serving in a Resource capacity on this committee. 

Aquatics Study Committee. The Aquatics Study Committee 
voted to terminate its official activity in September, 1966, feel- 
ing that construction of a pool could most appropriately be accom- 
plished in conjunction with the schools. On November 13, 1967, 
Jane Butler, John Stevenson and Nancy Butler of the Recreation Com- 



101 



mittee and Lawrence Zuelke, Chairman of the Aquatics Study Com- 
mittee, met with the Lincoln School Committee to further promote 
consideration of a school integrated swimming facility in the next 
building program. Moreover, during 1967 the Aquatics Study Com- 
mittee members have maintained interest in the problems of obtain- 
ing a suitable swimming facility and are cooperating with the mem- 
bers of the LWV Recreation Study Committee providing background 
information for this aspect of the LWV study. 

Fourth of July Program. The Recreation Committee scheduled 
and administered the various sports events and children's running 
races at the July 4th celebration. A Recreation Committee float 
was in the parade on the theme of Bicycle Safety. 

Christmas Carol Sing. Over 200 townspeople joined in sing- 
ing around a bonfire during the Christmas season. Ronald Davis 
led the caroling, and the Lincoln Girl Scouts served hot cocoa 
from the Pierce House porch. Paul Williams was in charge of the 
bonfire. 



The Committee regrets the loss of three members during the 
year: Mrs. L. Bruce Long, who served as Treasurer; Mrs. Stanley 
Wirsig, who served several years as Playground Chairman; and Mr. 
Charles Jennings, who supervised the Skating Program. 

Recreation Committee activities are greatly facilitated by 
the extensive cooperation of the Town Highway Department, particu- 
larly programs for Ski School, Bicycle Safety, and Summer Play- 
ground. 



1Q2 






DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Stanley Heck, President 
Hamilton James, Vice President 
Janet Daniels, Clerk 
Richard B. Bailey, Treasurer 
Francis S. Andrews 
Victor A. Lutnicki 
Sumner Smith 



The past year, the DeCordova Museum's 18th year, has been one 
of continued growth and consolidation. Attendance at classes, 
lectures, special events and exhibitions showed a substantial in- 
crease over previous years. Increase in income from these acti- 
vities combined with generous contributions from the Museum's sup- 
porters have restored the balance sheet to a satisfactory con- 
dition despite the heavy drain on our financial resources during 
the year. 

Although the income from the funds left in trust for the 
benefit of the Museum by Julian deCordova continues to grow, this 
income presently provides only about one-third of the funds re- 
quired each year by the Museum. Other sources of income are 
shown in the accompanying financial report. 

The efforts of the Associate Council, assisted by the Museum 
staff and particularly by the expertise of Francis S. Andrews, 
have raised our membership to more than 3,000 families. 

Thanks are also due to the committee which, under the direct- 
ion of Mrs. Bruce G. Daniels, managed the Silent Auction in Novem- 
ber. The committee's efforts resulted in a profit of more than 
$14,000 for the Museum. 

Our year-end appeal for contributions to the Museum brought in 
$3,500 by December 31st. By mid- January additional contributions 
had increased this total to more than $7,000. 

The Board is continuing its studies of the Museum's long-range 
requirements in terms of facilities, personnel and finances. 
Additional school facilities are needed to accommodate the many 
people who wish to participate in classroom activities, but are 
turned away each year due to lack of space. In order to free our 



103 



exhibition areas, consideration is being given to the possibility 
of constructing a facility for music, drama and dance. As the 
Museum grows, additional capital funds will be sought from our 
many loyal friends . 

The exhibitions arranged by our Director, Frederick P. Walkey , 
during 1967 have been imaginative and varied, with an appeal to 
people of many different tastes. Mr. Walkey has scheduled for 
1968 an even more stimulating group of exhibitions. Under the 
guidance of John D. McLaughlin, Curator of Education, the Museum 
School has continued to grow and new educational programs have 
been offered. The total enrollment in the School for the fall 
term of 1967 exceeded 800. The Lincoln Selectmen have gener- 
ously continued to make the facilities of the Town Hall available 
for the Museum's drama classes. 

On behalf of the Board of Directors, I wish to thank all the 
members of the staff and the many friends of the Museum who have 
helped make 1967 such a successful year. 



Stanley Heck, President 



104 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Financial Report for 1967 



INCOME 



Trusts $ 99,090.36 

Membership 55,506.50 

School Tuition 64,729.80 

Receipts from Events 48,467.96 

(concerts, lectures, films, 

exhibits, benefits, etc.) 
Other Income (sales, services, 22,830.16 

miscellaneous) 



Total Operating Income $ 290,624.78 

Contributions for Special Purposes 12,187.39 



Total Income, 1967 $302,812.17 



EXPENSE 

Staff Salaries & Benefits $106,915.10 

Operating Expense of School 56,353.48 
Operating Expense of Museum 

and Park 115,301.46 



Total Operating Expense $278,570.04 

Expense charged to Reserve Funds 27,606.51 

(building construction and renovation) 

Total Expense, 1967 $306,176.55 

Net Loss, 1967 $ 3,364.38 



105 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1967 



ASSETS: 



Checking Account 
Payroll Account 
Total Assets 

LIABILITIES : 



$ 26,813.13 
5,000.38 

$ 31,813.51 



Reserve Funds 
Payroll Reserve 
Working Capital 
Total Liabilities 



$ 21,500.00 
5,000.00 



5,313.51 



$ 31,813.51 



106 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Staff, December 31, 1967 



Frederick P. Walkey , Executive Director 

Miriam Jagger, Assistant to the Director 

John D. McLaughlin, Curator of Education 

Foster H. Nystrom, Administrative Assistant 

Ann A. Lummus , Membership Secretary 

Miriam S. Weinstein, Registrar and Librarian 

Cordelia Molloy, Bookkeeper 

Joan M. Kennedy, Secretary 

Franklin M. Balduf, Museum Custodian 

James W. Kelley, School Custodian 

Floriy Campobasso, Caretaker 

Salvatore Morizio, Assistant Custodian 



Part-time Staff 



Sheila B. Ruyle, Program Secretary 

Tonia B. Noell, Designer 

Carolyn J. Hergenrother, Assistant Secretary 

Ann Aschenbrenner, Art Supply Clerk 

Mary Comer ford, Receptionist 

Patricia A. Kelsey, Assistant Bookkeeper 



107 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Associate Council, December 31, 1967 

Mrs. Theodore W. Tucker, Chairman 

Mrs. Joseph W. Gardella, Secretary 

Mrs. Clarence G. Fauntleroy , Membership 

Mrs. Everett A. Black, Hospitality 

Mrs. John Davies , Volunteers 

Mrs. J. J. Duane , Films 

Mrs. Robert H. Booth, Garden Club 

Mrs. David Neelon, Acton Representative 

Mrs. Harold Wendorf, Acton Representative 

Mrs. Wayne Bloomquist, Bedford Representative 

Mrs. James Nay lor, Bedford Representative 

Mrs. Robert Asher, Concord Representative 

Mrs. Hans Burri , Concord Representative 

Mrs. Harry Zeltzer, Lexington Representative 

Mrs. Ann Bas tress, Lincoln Representative 

Mrs. Samuel Donnell, Lincoln Representative 

Mrs. John Edwards, Sudbury Representative 

Mrs. Joseph Atwood, Sudbury Representative 

Mrs. William Keast, Way land Representative 

Mrs. Zalman 0. Davlin, Wayland Representative 

Mrs. Edward Kenerson, Welles ley Representative 

Mrs. D. Elliot Cullati, Weston Representative 

Mrs. James Ryan, Weston Representative 



108 






September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

November 

November 

December 

December 

January 

February 

February 

April 

April 

May 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1968-1969 



2 Monday Labor Day (Holiday) 

3 Tuesday Workshops and Staff Orientation 

4 Wednesday Workshops and Staff Orientation 

5 Thursday Workshops and Staff Orientation 

6 Friday School Opens - All Classes 
11 Monday Veteran's Day - Holiday 

27 Wednesday Vacation (Begins at Noontime) 
2 Monday Classes Resume 

23 Monday Vacation Begins 
2 Thursday Classes Resume 

17 Monday Vacation Week 

24 Monday Classes Resume 
21 Monday Vacation Week 

28 Monday Classes Resume 
30 Friday Memorial Day - Holiday 
13 Friday Brooks School Graduation - 8:00 P.M. 
16 Monday Hanscom School Graduation - 2:00 P.M. 
20 Friday Classes End at Noontime 

23 Monday Staff - Closing Activities 

24 Tuesday Staff - Closing Activities 

25 Wednesday Staff - Closing Activities 



N.B. : Within the regular school year, classes end 
at noontime on Wednesdays with the exception 
of the week in which there are holidays ; in 
those instances, Wednesdays are full days of 
school. 



SUMMER SCHOOL - 1969 



September 

October 

November 

December 

January 



June 30- 


Summer 


School Opens 




July 25- 


Summer 


School Ends 




■ by Months : 






17 




February 


15 


23 




March 


21 


18 




April 


17 


15 




May 


21 


22 




June 


15 



109 



Kindergarten morning and afternoon 
sessions will reverse on Monday, 
January 27, 1969. 

Number of Days in School Year: 184 

Number of Days in Summer School: 19 



"NO SCHOOL" SIGNALS - Local signals will be given on 
our fire alarm system 



7:15 a.m. 
7:30 a.m. 



3-3-3, repeated at 
3-3-3 



Radio announcements will be read between the period of 
6:30 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. Please refrain from tying up 
local phone lines to school officials and bus operators. 
(WCOP...1150 K; WBZ...1030 K; WEEI...590 K; WHDH...850 K; 
WEZE...1260 K; WMEX...1510 K; WRKO...680 K) 



Announcements regarding "NO SCHOOL" are made by the 
Lincoln Superintendent of Schools for the Lincoln 
Elementary Schools (Grade K-8) only. Announcements 
for the Regional High School are made by the Regional 
Superintendent of Schools and will be designated "Lin- 
coln-Sudbury Regional High School". 



110 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 



School Committee 



Charles H. Stevens, Chairman 
Margaret B. Marsh 
John R. White 

Meetings: Regular: 



Called: 



Term Expires 

1968 
1969 
1970 



First Monday of each month, 
7:30 P.M. Office of the 
Superintendent, 259-9400 

Third Monday of each month, 
usually, and other meetings 
as stated. Time and place 

to be designated. 

All regular meetings open. 
Items for the agenda must be 
in the Office of the Superin- 
tendent by 3:00 P.M. on the 
Thursday prior to the Monday 
meeting . 



Robert L. Filbin 



Superintendent of Schools 

Center School 
Administrative Assistant 



259-9400 



George W. Drake 



Center School 



Superintendent's Office Staff 



(Mrs.) Mary Ann Wilson 
(Mrs.) Irene Ayer 
(Mrs.) Mary Bufton 
(Mrs.) Solveig Parsons 



Hours 



Secretary 

Financial Secretary 
Clerk- Typist 
Secretary 



259-9406 



259-9400 
259-9401 
259-9401 
259-9401 



Office of the Superintendent ■ 
8:30 A.M. -4:30 P.M., Monday - 
Friday; Saturday and evenings 
by appointment. 



Ill 



Principal, Hartwell School 
(Mrs.) Joan B. Warren 

Office Staff 
(Mrs.) Doris Bardsley 



Secretary, Hartwell 
School 



(Mrs.) Kathryne Palmer 



Stefan Vogel 



Principal, Smith School 



Office Staff 



(Mrs.) Mary Donovan Secretary, Smith School 

(Mrs.) Shirley Beaton 



Timothy Rhodes 



(Mrs.) Polly Canty 
(Mrs.) Edna Nystrom 



Principal, Brooks School 



Office Staff 



Timothy Graves 



Secretary, Brooks School 
Principal, Hanscom Primary School 

Office Staff 



Secretary, Hanscom 

Primary School 



(Mrs.) Margaret Conway 
(Mrs . ) Shirley Seavey 

Principal, Hanscom Upper School 
Robert A. Leach 

Office Staff 
(Mrs . ) Ruby Gregory 
(Mrs.) Eunice Hinckley 



Secretary, Hanscom 
Upper School 



259-9404 



259-9404 
259-9404 



259-9403 



259-9403 
259-9403 



259-9408 



259-9408 
259-9408 



274-7721 



274-7721 
274-7721 



274-7720 



274-7720 
274-7720 



112 



Non-Staff Members - Resigned 1967 



(Mrs.) Nancy Colbert 
(Mrs.) Rachel Conner 
(Mrs.) Eileen Salender 
(Mrs.) Lorraine Wells 
(Mrs.) Harriett Parks 



Smith School 
Brooks School 
Brooks School 
Hanscom Upper School 
Superintendent's Office 



Hours - School Offices 
8:15 a. m. - 4:15 p. m. , Monday through Friday 
School Nurses 



(Mrs.) Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 

Hartwell, Smith and Brooks Schools 

(Mrs.) Gladys Crumb, R. N. 

Hanscom Primary and Upper Schools 



John J. Carroll 



Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 
Center School 
Custodians 



259-9407 



274-7723 



259-9406 



Richard Gunzelmann 



Center School 



Fes t us Armstrong 
Joseph L. Maher 
Antonio Zeoli 



Hartwell School 
Hartwell School 
Hartwell School 



Frank Murdock 
Ralph Weatherbee 



Smith School 
Smith School 



John Biondo 
Chester R. Holt 



Brooks School 
Brooks School 



Oscar DeConto 
Thomas Casserly 

Sanford Abbott 
Arthur Gastonguay 



Albert J. Connors 
Albert A. Fava 



Hanscom Primary School 
Hanscom Primary School 

Hanscom Upper School 
Hanscom Upper School 

Terminated employment in 1967 



Ralph H. Gilbert, Jr. 
Harold Cuttell (Deceased) 



113 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Margaret B. Marsh 

John R. White 

Charles H. Stevens, Chairman 



The motives and aims of the Lincoln School Committee, Ad- 
ministration, and faculty, center on providing the individual 
student with the opportunity and stimulation for an educational 
experience that opens new horizons, encourages curiosity, and 
builds useful skills. This policy - in effect for many years - 
has spurred the continuing search for a discerning, experienced, 
and inspired faculty and for better methods of grouping and in- 
struction. The results of these efforts are reported to you 
annually in these pages and more frequently in the pages of the 
Weathervane , the Fence Viewer and the LSA newsletter. 

But the School Committee, Administration and faculty are 
not the only forces at work in our schools. Changes taking 
place in the world around us have a profound effect upon what 
happens in the classroom. No longer susceptible to the charge 
of being an ivory tower, the school must be able to sense the 
changes taking place, anticipate the effects that each change 
will make in educational requirements and adjust as smoothly as 
possible. This ability to respond to the need for adjustment 
is one measure of the adequacy of the system; we cannot offer 
our rural setting as an excuse excluding us from meeting the 
demands of our times. 

Many of these forces for change are old; they take new 
forms and new names and for a season become more or less dominant 
In what follows some of the forces we currently feel are dis- 
cussed. 

The predominant change is the one that takes place in our 
student body. As year succeeds to year we have a ten percent 
change in the students with whom we work. The saying, "Children 
are the same the world over" has some merit as a generalization; 
it has no validity at all in a small group. The younger in- 
habitants of our schools are not diminutive replicas of their 
older brothers and sisters. They are special individuals coming 
from homes that are the product of new forces too complex to deal 
with here. But the children are different and the differences 
are not superficial. They arrive now with deeper and broader 



114 



backgrounds and with social attitudes that partake of those we 
recognize more usually in adults. One result of this change 
is that the faculty is obliged to give special attention to 
helping children evaluate the sources from which information 
comes and thereby build an ability to acquire judgement with 
knowledge. 

Another of the changes we see affecting our schools is the 
emerging difference in attitude toward law, foreign affairs, 
and social issues on the part of the adult community. Our 
children are not raised in a vacuum and as these issues are 
raised on television, in the newspapers, and at the family table, 
the schools find that they must provide a solid background of 
information in order that the pupil may come to useful conclu- 
sions regarding his own part in his society. 

Group behavior is changing too, not so much among the 
children as among adults. Seeking to improve their individual 
experience and effectiveness, teachers along with others are - 
with increasing frequency - coming together to act as a group 
force in the school community. While this action has not and 
may not take place in Lincoln, we will see and feel its effects 
to an increasing extent. Collective bargaining for salaries 
and working conditions represents the visible facet of this 
group action but there are other factors too. In some cities 
teachers are seeking to gather to themselves certain duties long 
reserved for the administration. Within the legislature, a fer- 
mentation long at work has begun to reach significant propor- 
tions. This group has passed laws calling for improved minimum 
salaries for our teachers and provided for joint action at the 
bargaining table. The state has also acted in other areas, 
specifying statewide standards and requiring compliance in many 
curriculum areas once considered the sole domain of the local 
school committee. Some of these actions will affect Lincoln 
directly but in most cases the effect will be indirect as in the 
case of salaries - our minimum salary, which is above the state 
minimum, is pushed upward by the pressure of salary advances in 
other communities with whom we compete for teachers. 

Changing fashions in education affect us too. Since Sput- 
nik tipped the scales to emphasize the physical sciences we have 
seen a gradual change toward the social sciences. One of the 
pressures bring this change has been the need to help the child 
to realize that a knowledge of his fellow man offers a protection 
and a strength not less than that offered by physical science. 



115 



There has also been a nod toward the educational concept of the 
whole man. The thought that each person must be a specialist 
to survive has made way for the idea that a well-rounded in- 
dividual offers society much that is desirable. Even in the 
seemingly important matter of college entry and career success 
the change of fashion affects us. Young people - no longer 
satisfied with an artificial series of peaks to scale toward a 
goal of materialistic gain - seek new reasons for wisdom and 
knowledge and find those reasons in what can be done to help 
their fellow man and in the idea that each step in education (el- 
ementary, secondary, college, graduate) is complete - not just a 
tenuous toehold to some higher pinnacle. 

And thus we come full cycle for we are again dealing with 
the changing needs of the individual student. Meeting these 
needs is an effort worthy of the best that we can all give to 
it in time and thought. As we on the School Committee do our 
share we are grateful for the parents, citizens, and all who 
work (both inside and outside our formally structured town organ- 
izations) to help our young people. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Robert L. Filbin 



During the year 1967 the Lincoln Schools continued in their 
endeavor to meet the changing needs of boys and girls in a socie- 
ty which is moving rapidly ahead in many directions and which 
sometimes does not wait for people to assimilate what is taking 
place. 

The year was marked by cooperative efforts between the staff 
of the Lincoln Elementary Schools, the Sudbury Elementary Schools 
and the Lin coin- Sudbury Regional High School to co-ordinate and 
up-date the various curricula at every level in order that there 
would be cohesion and clear purpose as the children moved through 
the elementary schools to the high school. 

One aspect of this effort is the use of Miss Cecile T. Brault 
to supervise the French program in the schools. Miss Brault who 
is on the staff of the Regional High School visits the Brooks 



116 



School once a week to observe in French classes and to discuss 
her observations with the French teachers. French teachers at 
Brooks School have also visited classes at the Regional High 
School in order to see the entire French program at work. 

At work, as well, has been an inter-school mathematics com- 
mittee which has developed a mathematics guide K-8 which was 
officially adopted by the three districts in November. Active 
in this committee have been the chairman of the Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional High School Mathematics Department, the Chairman of the 
Sudbury Junior High School Mathematics Department, Mr. Ronald 
Hadge, Chairman of the Lincoln Mathematics Committee and Mrs. 
Elizabeth Bjork, elementary mathematics consultant for the Lin- 
coln Schools. 

Also working has been a committee in the area of music 
education. This latter group which has included members of the 
music staff of all three districts made a major report recommend- 
ing basic improvements in the music program. Their work was 
based on the recommendations of Beatrice Landeck, music consult- 
ant, who visited all three school districts to observe music pro- 
grams a year ago. 

Meeting on a monthly basis the three superintendents have 
kept each other appraised of the on-going work of the schools and 
have continuously looked ahead to those aspects of the three 
school programs which could be co-ordinated. 

What about the Lincoln Schools in particular? The year 
1967 showed a slight drop in pupil enrollment over the previous 
year. While the last four years have shown an increase in home 
building in the Town over the previous four years the enrollment 
reached its peak of 1051 pupils last year. The current enroll- 
ment of 1026 pupils reflects a drop of twenty-five pupils. How 
long this levelling off will last is difficult to predict. Kin- 
dergarten classes have declined in size. Census predictions 
indicate they will remain at the same level for the next few 
years. Enrollment in the upper grades has increased at least in 
the seventh grade to 132 children, which is the largest number of 
children in a single class to date. Many of these children are 
new or recent residents of Lincoln. As of October 1st of 1967 
a total of thirty-seven children in the schools had moved from 
Lincoln and fifty-one had moved in. If the kindergarten en- 
rollment had been at its level of 110 to 120 children as it has in 
previous years, the school population would have shown a slight 



117 



increase. There are many factors at work in this situation, 
among which are decline in the birthrate, the general increase 
in the cost of houses in Lincoln and more family mobility. 

Hanscom School remains at the same basic enrollment as last 
year. All housing units are occupied and in fact there is a 
housing shortage at the base which necessitates many families 
living off of the base. Until additional housing is provided at 
Hanscom Field the enrollment will remain at approximately the 
same level since attendance at Hanscom School by children of the 
Air Force personnel is contingent upon living on the base in base 
housing. The present enrollment necessitates the use of three 
rooms at Center School which are used on a rental basis for Hans- 
com kindergarten classes. 

Added to the over-all school staff this year and serving 
both the Lincoln center and Hanscom campuses is a Social Worker, 
Mrs. Patricia Kinsman, formerly with the Family Society and field 
instructor in social work for Smith College and Boston University. 
Previously the schools had used the part-time services of a social 
worker on the staff of the Walden Clinic. 

A third librarian was added to the Smith School staff. This 
means that there is now one full-time school librarian in each of 
the schools. 

For the first time a class for mentally retarded children 
was organized and is located in Center School. Both children 
from Hanscom Field and the Town of Lincoln attend this class. 
Formerly children were sent to special classes in surrounding 
towns on a tuition basis, but the number of children has increased 
to the point where it is necessary to have a special class as part 
of the regular school program. The schools were fortunate in 
securing the services of Miss Margot DuBois , formerly Special 
Class teacher for the Board of Cooperative Educational Services in 
Suffolk County, New York, to take responsibility for this class. 

The schools continue with their non-graded approach to edu- 
cation and with the idea of multi-age groups at the primary and 
intermediate levels. Details of this program are given in the 
reports of principals which follow. 

The METCO Program continues in the schools this year with 
eight additional children from the Boston, Roxbury, Dorchester 
area attending kindergarten. This brings the total in this 
group to eighteen children, all of whom are attending Hartwell 



118 



School. This program which is funded by the Federal Government 
and is a part of a total program shared with other communities in 
the Boston suburbs has worked out very successfully. The School 
Committee plan is to add ten additional children for each of the 
next two years so that approximately forty children will be attend- 
ing the Lincoln Schools under the METCO plan. 

During the first half of 1967 I was on sabbatical leave as 
a full-time graduate student at Columbia University at Teachers 
College where I was in the doctoral program leading to the Doctors ' 
degree in administration of public school systems. I was a fel- 
low in the Institute of Administrative Research which is affiliated 
with Teachers College. During the time I was at Columbia I was 
appointed Paul Mort Fellow. This appointment is awarded annually 
to a superintendent of schools who meets the requirements of this 
honorary fellowship. The experience as a student and as Paul Mort 
Fellow was most unique and rewarding and afforded me many opportun- 
ities which would not be available to a school man on the job. 
They were namely, the opportunity to be in direct association with 
outstanding men in the fields of public school administration, 
sociology, psychology, economics, public affairs and politics, and 
to be working in the field of administrative research on both a 
practical and theoretical level. 

During the course of the year I formulated a project pro- 
posal based on research in the area of specialist deployment. I 
used data gathered in over a hundred public school systems through- 
out the United States relative to the functional deployment of 
specialists other than regular classroom teachers in the schools. 
This included superintendents, supervisors, principals, specialists 
in library, remedial reading, speech, guidance, health, etc. I 
hope to analyze and classify the functions of specialists in order 
to arrive at some specific patterns of deployment and, at the same 
time, to apply various measures to determine the effect of school 
district size, financial support and other factors on specific pat- 
terns of deployment. Lincoln will benefit by the ongoing aspects 
of this study. 

This then represents the highlights of the many activities 
carried on in the school program this past year. 

In the minds of the staff of the schools there are on-going 
basic questions related to education and the processes of learning 
which will be with us always. They are the same kinds of questions 
raised by Aristotle over three centuries ago when he said: 



119 



"Consideration must be given to the question, 
what constitutes education and what is the 
proper way to be educated? At present there 
are differences of opinion as to the proper 
tasks to be set; for all peoples do not agree 
as to the things that the young ought to learn, 
either with a view to virtue or with a view to 
the best life, nor is it clear whether their 
studies should be regulated more with regard 
to intellect or with regard to character. And 
confusing questions arise out of the education 
that actually prevails, and it is not at all 
clear whether the pupils should practice pur- 
suits that are practically useful, or morally 
edifying, or higher accomplishments - for all 
these views have won the support of some judges." 

It is unlikely that many of our questions can be answered 
once and for all but must be weighed in terms of the needs of the 
times and worked out by each generation in terms of its own values 
and commitments. 

The staff of the schools will constantly seek the best solu- 
tions to the problems of education as they arise and continue to 
ask the kinds of questions which will hopefully be a means of get- 
ting at better ways to educate our young. 



PRINCIPALS, HARTWELL, SMITH AND BROOKS SCHOOLS 

(Mrs.) Joan Warren, Principal, Hartwell Primary School 
Stefan Vogel , Principal, Smith Middle School 
Timothy Rhodes, Principal, Brooks Upper School 



HARTWELL SCHOOL 

STAFF 



September opening found Hartwell School staffed with twenty- 
one full-time and two part-time teachers. Two of these teachers 
are new to Lincoln and represent replacements, one having previous 
experience and the other having been a student teacher with us 
last year. There are also five shared specialists in the areas 

120 



of art, math, science, speech and school social worker who spend 
time at Hartwell. Four student teachers from Boston University 
and one from Simmons have been working with the faculty and we ex- 
pect Lesley students during the second semester as well. 

This year we have three teacher aides working on staggered 
schedules during four days of the week. Not only do they super- 
vise recesses (their main function last year) but are involved in 
walking classes of children to and from the art and music rooms, 
multi-purpose room and library, as well as a great variety of 
other tasks which free teachers to concentrate more on children's 
learning. In October a library aide was employed to carry out 
a variety of tasks in the library. Volunteer mothers also con- 
tribute greatly to our program. 

BUILDING UTILIZATION 

The main building now houses all children in Teams R, Y and 
B. The classroom next to the library, formerly called the Re- 
source Room was needed again for general classroom use so the Re- 
source Room was moved to the Audio-Visual Room. Between a teach- 
er aide, library aide and librarian, this room is supervised dur- 
ing most school hours and gives further dimension to our in- 
structional materials center. Unit A houses Team W (ninety-one 
seven-eight year olds with four teachers) and Unit C houses Team 
G (ninety seven-eight year olds with four teachers) . Unit B con- 
tains our Art and Music Rooms and two sections of sixth grade 
from Brooks School. 

Office space continues to be a problem. The math and 
science specialists have moved from the Audio-Visual Room to teach- 
er offices in the Units. Mrs. Cole, reading specialist, Mrs. 
Kinsman, social worker, and Miss Welch, speech specialist, all 
share the conference room. At times this is a most unsatisfactory 
arrangement. As we have additional special services the need for 
more small spaces is obvious. 

ORGANIZATION 

A transition group was begun in September. Children in 
this group were identified last year in Team R as having probable 
learning difficulties in learning to read. They receive very 
specific training in perceptual skills and will move into more 
formal reading as each one is ready. The classroom teacher, read- 
ing, music and physical education specialists work as a team in 
planning, teaching and evaluating a variety of materials. This 

121 



group is housed adjacent to the five year olds and also near the 
six year olds, and have recess and large group lessons with the 
latter. 

As a further extension of our non-graded philosophy where 
continuous progress for each child is the goal, we have grouped 
together children and teachers who we felt could work well with 
each other. Some six year olds were together, some grouped with 
seven year olds. Some seven year olds were grouped with sixes 
and some with eight year olds. Eight year olds were placed in 
Team G or W along with some sevens. This more natural placement 
has proven successful for most children. 

INSTRUCTION 



As in the past, all classroom teachers teach language arts. 
Teachers working with the six, six-sevens, also teach math, soc- 
ial studies and science. Teachers working with the seven-eight 
year olds teach math or social studies-science. Cooperative 
planning , teaching and evaluating within a team and cross-team 
continue to improve instruction. Specialists (art, music, etc.) 
are involved in this planning as much as possible. Frequent 
faculty meetings are held to maintain open communication between 
all teachers. 

Mrs. Julia Cole, reading specialist, gave a three day Spald- 
ing introductory course for all new staff of Hartwell and Smith 
Schools prior to the opening of school. Throughout the year as 
student teachers arrive, she briefs them in several sessions. 
Her work of last year in screening all five year olds and identify- 
ing those children having probable reading difficulties has been 
recognized by many other school systems who have come to us for 
advice. 

Mrs. Patricia Kinsman, social worker, joined the Lincoln 
Schools in September, and has already proven immensely helpful to 
children, parents and teachers. The need for this service is 
great, for preventative work at the primary school age alleviates 
many more serious problems from developing at a later date. We 
are indeed fortunate to have a person so well qualified to work 
with us. 

SUMMER SESSION 

Twenty-eight children attended the eighteen day summer 
session for instruction in language arts and math. The main cur- 

122 






riculum work of this session was in the area of social studies. 
Mrs. Margaret McWade worked with a group of Hartwell and Hanscom 
Primary School teachers to develop the second part of a two year 
cycle for the seven-eight year olds in both schools. The enthu- 
siasm and excitement of this group was most contagious and in two 
short weeks much was accomplished. Another group of teachers 
from both schools worked on the six-seven curriculum. Mrs. Mc- 
Wade continues her leadership in this area, meeting weekly with 
the three other teachers working with the seven-eights in the 
social studies-science areas. She serves as Hartwell representa- 
tive on the Social Studies Committee (composed of members from 
Lincoln Center and Hanscom schools) and works closely with Miss 
Ann Matthews, science specialist for Hanscom Primary and Hartwell 
Schools. 

Mrs. Betty Bjork and Mrs. Diane Nockles worked during the 
summer session in the area of math, organizing materials for 
teachers and working on the beginnings of a math lab (individual- 
izing materials). Mrs. Jane Stewart worked on reorganizing mater- 
ials and curriculum for Team R. Mrs. Julia Cole worked in the 
area of reading and helped relocate all reading texts and related 
materials in the resource room. Mrs. Phebe Tonseth , Librarian, 
worked for two weeks , and as well as doing cataloguing and other 
related Library work, was a valuable member of the social studies 
group. 

SPECIAL PROGRAM 

September, 1967, began the second year of Lincoln's associa- 
tion with METCO (Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunities) 
During the school year 1966-67 ten five year old negro children 
from Roxbury and North Dorchester attended Team R at Hartwell. 
These ten have moved on to Team Y and an additional eight five 
year olds have started in Team R. Cooperation of the Lincoln 
METCO coordinating committee, headed by Mrs. Jean Stoudt and Mrs. 
Claire Hopkins, has proven of valuable assistance to the faculty. 
The Lincoln parents involved in this METCO program have made it 
possible for these children to share in community activities aside 
from their scholastic experiences. 

FUTURE PLANS 



The faculty will continue to evaluate the strengths and 
weaknesses of our current organization and various areas of the 
curriculum. We constantly strive to develop better techniques 
and materials to help children learn. It is the spirit of enthu- 



123 



siasm and recognition of each individual's worth which character- 
izes this faculty. Since close communications between parents 
and teachers are so important in assessing the growth of each 
child we again urge each parent to visit the School at anytime. 

In closing I regretfully announce that Mrs. Phebe Tonseth, 
Hartwell Librarian, will be resigning in June to move with her 
family to Maine. Her contribution to Hartwell' s children, par- 
ents and faculty has been immeasurable. 

Again I wish to express my personal appreciation to the 
parents of Lincoln children, other members of our administrative 
staff and the school committee for their continued encouragement 
and support. 



SMITH SCHOOL 



STAFF 



The Smith School has a full-time faculty of fourteen teach- 
ers, five of whom represent replacements, with one new position of 
school librarian. The music and physical education teachers on 
the Smith School staff are shared with the Brooks School students. 
Eight additional persons are shared with other schools in Lincoln, 
and represent the following areas: art, physical education, health, 
guidance, reading, mathematics and speech. Many of these persons 
act as consultants as well as teachers. 

Two aides are employed on a part-time basis to assist class- 
room teachers in the preparation of materials, small-group work, 
correction work, typing and filing, and lunch and recess duty. 

At present, four student teachers are assigned to the school 
from Boston University and from Simmons College. 

BUILDING UTILIZATION 

Two hundred and forty-three children use nine regular class- 
rooms in Smith School. In addition, the South Lobby continues 
both as a regular classroom and large-group area, the music room 
now serves as a full-time music room on a shared basis with Brooks 
School, the Middle School Library is located in room 6A, and room 
4 is used 80% of the day for Middle School students, with the re- 
mainder of the time serving Brooks School students. Special faci- 



124 



lities , such as the gymnasium, auditorium and lecture hall are 
shared on a regularly scheduled basis between the Middle and Upper 
School students. 

ORGANIZATION 

As a result of the faculty study conducted last spring, 
which included a complete survey of the parents of Middle School 
students, the organization this year represents a continuation of 
the non-graded, inter- aged program. Certain modifications were 
made based on the reaction of children, teachers and parents to 
last year's program. Perhaps the most important change in the 
Middle School this year was the combining of reading and language 
arts instruction, and the institution of longer time blocks. 

Under this plan, children see fewer teachers for longer 
periods of time. Teachers, however, are still able to use the 
team-teaching approach with about the same degree of subject area 
specialization. Two teaching teams instructing both age groups 
form the nucleus of the plan, - one a language arts team and the 
other a mathematics-social studies team. All teachers teach sci- 
ence. Subject teams meet weekly to share experiences and to plan. 
In reading, a full-time consultant is available. Part-time con- 
sultants in mathematics and science assist the teachers in their 
work . 

Children are placed in homerooms containing half each of 
nine and ten year olds, who are instructed in these groups in art, 
physical education and science. 

Individual learning rates and achievement levels determine 
the grouping of classes in language arts, mathematics and social 
studies. About one- fourth of these classes are inter-aged. 
Music is taught in these classes as well. In an attempt to pro- 
vide as much heterogeneous experience as possible, children are 
regrouped occasionally for social studies, and classes in language 
arts are combined whenever feasible. 

Communication about children and subject planning is enhanced 
under the present plan. Most children see no more than three 
teachers in the basic subject areas. These teachers are able to 
know the children better and more easily able to meet together 
when necessary to discuss common problems. 



125 



INSTRUCTION 

Summer Session . A total of thirteen children in the Middle 
School were enrolled in remedial classes in reading, spelling, 
composition and mathematics. Working on either a full, or part- 
time basis, were the following staff members: Mrs. Phyllis McKen- 
ney , Miss Ann Zanghi , Mr. Joseph Lessard, Mr. Robert Cummings , Mrs 
Carolyn Green and Mrs. Martha Salisbury. 

The immediate job of the summer staff, apart from instruction, 
was to complete the planning for the school organization in Sep- 
tember, 1967, based on the study previously mentioned. Subject 
teams were organized, the master schedule completed, students and 
rooms assigned. 

Two major curriculum projects were completed. The mathe- 
matics curriculum was completely revised, based on two years ex- 
perience with the SRA Cleveland Mathematics program. In social 
studies, staff members serving on the school system-wide social 
studies committee wrote two units for use in the fall: one on 
Japan, and one on Medieval life. In reading, a resource paper 
was completed which explained to teachers ways in which currently 
available reading materials could be individualized. In social 
studies and science, long-range plans for the year were developed. 

The staff of the Middle School continues to express its 
appreciation to the school committee for continuing the summer 
program. Without such time made available, a great deal of what 
is accomplished in the way of organizational and curricular im- 
provement would not be possible. 

INS ER VICE EDUCATION 



Inservice education is provided on an informal basis in the 
weekly team meetings at which consultants in mathematics and read- 
ing are usually present. One staff member is currently attend- 
ing a series of conservation workshops being given by the Liberty 
Council. Social studies teachers meet monthly to discuss the 
preparation and evaluation of various units being taught. Work 
in linguistics is expected to begin with language arts teachers 
in the spring of 1968. 



126 



BROOKS SCHOOL 



Grades six, seven and eight, which comprise the Brooks 
School, are running about 120 pupils per grade these years. The 
grade that went from sixth to seventh during 1967 numbered an all 
time high of 135, but the other grades were between 110 and 120. 
Each grade was divided into six sections till June, but starting 
in September, the sixth and eighth were taught in five sections, 
which made possible a small reduction in staff even though an ex- 
panding program required more teachers in special areas. 

The teaching staff for the 360 and 370 pupils consisted of 
twenty-one full-time teachers, two half-time teachers, three 
teachers shared with the Middle School, three supervisor teachers, 
one librarian, and a teacher aide (part-time). One teacher was 
named assistant principal. There were ten resignations over the 
summer, and nine teachers were elected as replacements. 

The "expanded" program centered around the elective courses 
which seventh and eighth graders were allowed for the first time 
to choose. The choices were French, to which all children had 
been introduced, Latin, Typing, Speed Reading, Remedial Spelling, 
Speech, and Paragraph Writing. The elective is the fifth major 
course for each pupil. These courses are taught in smaller 
groups than the usual twenty-three or twenty-four per class and 
seem to have provided an individualization of educational offer- 
ing that has been profitably used by the pupils. Every pupil 
was given his choice, and very few choices turned out badly. 

The pressure for teaching space was relieved in September by 
our taking over the two nearest classrooms of the Hartwell School 
for use by the sixth grade. While the children placed there have 
been included in all school-wide activities and have used the li- 
brary, gym, music room, art room, and other specialized facilities 
of the Brooks School, and have joined the other part of the sixth 
grade for recess and after school activities, their closer organ- 
ization under two teachers for most of their subjects has seemed 
to be beneficial. 

Five teachers spent part or all of July at school. Four 
of them devoted time to inventory and effective storage of educa- 
tional materials; three of them had new responsibilities to pre- 
pare for; three were developing or reviewing new units of in- 
struction, and one taught two classes each morning. In addition 
other teachers came in from time to time to confer about plans for 
the coming year. 



127 



HANSCOM SCHOOL 



Robert A. Leach, Head Principal 

Timothy Graves, Principal, Primary School 



Refining and otherwise improving instructional approaches 
instituted last year, such as team teaching, multi- aging and more 
effective non-grading have marked efforts this year at the Hanscom 
School Complex. 

BUILDING UTILIZATION 



The two new primary units opened last year have proven most 
effective in terms of the flexibility of classroom space. How- 
ever, to meet a need for specialized teaching spaces, two rooms 
in the original building are now being used by primary classes for 
music and art. The multi-purpose room of the main building is 
also shared with the middle school for assemblies, large group 
activities, and physical education classes. 

Several community groups are using the new school gymnasium 
and multi-purpose room this year. Those groups include Cub Scouts 
dancing classes, and Base athletic teams. 

STAFF 



The present staff of the Primary School includes eighteen 
classroom teachers, a librarian, art specialist, music specialist 
and three shared specialists in physical education, reading and 
science. Seven new staff members have been added to replace 
vacancies. Five of these staff members have had previous teach- 
ing experience. The Primary School has also had two teacher 
aides for two hours a day whose duties have been supervision of 
recess and cafeteria, clerical work within the teams and assistance 
to teachers within the teams and assistance to teachers within the 
classrooms. Eight student teachers from Boston University and 
four from Lesley College have gained practical experience from 
being involved in the Primary and Middle Schools. 

Over all, the staff at Hanscom totals sixty-two professional 
members and twenty persons assigned to the school offices, cafe- 
teria and custodial staffs. 



128 



INSTRUCTIONAL 

Language Arts and Mathematics have continued to be grouped 
by homogeneous achievement levels. Science and Social Studies 
are heterogeneously grouped. The Art and Music Specialists have 
flexible schedules which allow them to work with one team or teach- 
er for extended periods of time. Instead of four teams for the 
four age groups in the Primary School, six teams have been made. 
Some of these teams have children of different ages. 

The Primary School is most proud of its library and pupil 
resources program. A strong emphasis is being placed on audio- 
visual materials such as records and film strips. Individual 
pupils are able to operate film strip viewers or phonographs in 
the listening viewing booths without disturbing the rest of the 
class . 

The Middle School, reorganized last year as a multi-aged, 
nongraded group, has been taught by three teams, totaling eight 
teachers, under the direction of Mrs. Kathleen Woodruff, co-ordin- 
ator. Emphasis is on continuous progress for individual child- 
ren through eight levels of ability, encompassing our nine and ten- 
year-old children. 

The Upper School homerooms now contain students from all 
three upper school classes. Where possible, this multi-aged ap- 
proach is carried out in instructional areas. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Sixty-five children attended summer school for reading and 
fifty-nine for Math. 

An interesting enrichment class in Math was presented to 
seventh grade students utilizing a computer in Cambridge, owned by 
the firm of Bolt, Beranek and Newman. This course, taught by 
staff members of M.I.T., sought to determine the feasibility of 
teaching an Algorithmic approach to algebra to junior high stu- 
dents. Two teletypewriter machines were installed and connected 
with the computer by telephone lines for this course. Many ex- 
citing possibilities, which may foretell the future direction of 
computerized instruction, were the outgrowth of this experiment. 

Staff members were also engaged in re-organizing and re- 
scheduling for team- teaching approaches to subjects at all levels. 
Finally, a new social studies program was written, the Language 



129 



Arts materials centralized. 

FUTURE PLANS 

Close cooperation between the Kindergarten (at Center School) 
and the rest of the Primary School, has been difficult to maintain 
this year because of the physical separation. Approximately 
twenty children have needed the experience of both the Kindergarten 
and the facilities at the Hans com Complex. Hopefully there will 
be room to house Kindergarten classes at the Hanscom Complex in 
the near future. 

It is felt that a need also exists for additional facilities 
for classrooms and special class facilities, (science, art, music), 
for the Upper School, as the input from the Middle and Primary 
School increases. This need will be intensified upon the con- 
struction of one hundred additional housing units, authorized but 
not yet funded at this writing. If funds are cleared, a target 
date for starting construction has been set for April of this year. 

The present school population, of over 800 children, has not 
reached the predicted estimate again this year, for various rea- 
sons, including the Viet Nam situation. However, a slow but con- 
tinued growth may be expected when the situation is stabilized. 



SCHOOL NURSE 

Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 



Children entering kindergarten this year had the state re- 
quired physical examination including smallpox vaccination. The 
majority were seen by their own family doctors. Seventeen kin- 
dergarten examinations were done by Dr. John Davies at the Well 
Child Conference. It is now required by the Department of Public 
Health that all elementary school children attending either public 
or private schools must be immunized against smallpox, diphtheria, 
tetanus, whooping cough, polio and measles, unless exempted for 
medical or religious reasons. 

In November and December school wide dental screening was 
done by Dr. Tingey . Two hundred and thirty children were referred 
to family dentists for treatment and orthodontia. 



130 



During the fall and winter the annual vision and hearing 
testing was done with the help of trained volunteers. There 
were nineteen final hearing failures and sixty-three vision fail- 
ures. These children were discussed with their parents and re- 
ferred for medical diagnosis and correction. 

In May the annual tuberculin testing at the six year old 
level was done by Dr. John Sisson. Eighty-four children were 
tested. There were no positive reactors. This program of 
"child centered" tuberculin testing is recommended by the Division 
of Tuberculosis Control and has been used in the Hartwell School 
for five years. The program also provides an opportunity for 
school employees to comply with the law which requires a negative 
chest X-ray or negative tuberculin test every three years. 

During the year two films were shown as part of the health 
education program for adolescent girls. They were "You're a 
Young Lady Now" and "Its Wonderful Being a Girl". The eight, 
nine and ten year olds saw the film "Wonders of Our Body" which 
describes the structure and functions of the ear, the eye and the 
heart. "Hemo the Magnificent", which tells about the blood and 
circulatory system, and the functions of the heart, lungs and kid- 
neys as related to circulation, was seen by classes at Brooks 
School. 

Several meetings were held with Dr. John Sisson, the school 
doctor, and principals, guidance department and school nurses on 
the subject of health instruction and sex education and plans for 
a more comprehensive program in the future. 

In the spring I attended a series of lectures at the Fernald 
School on the subject of "Care of Mentally Retarded and Emotion- 
ally Disturbed Children". 

Again this year I wish to thank my generous volunteers for 
the services they have given to the school health program. Mrs. 
Richard Rosane works at the Hartwell School two mornings a week. 
Mrs. David Ammen and Mrs. Richard Austin have helped faithfully 
with the vision and hearing programs, and Mrs. Stanley Tead whose 
invaluable help keeps health records up to date. 



131 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
CLASS OF 1967 



Elizabeth A. Algeo 
Martha Winchester Allen 
Susan Rousmaniere Avery 
Mark G. Beaton 
Charlotte A. Braun 
Wallace R. Brown 
Monica Robin Burroughs 
Ann Marie Camp ob as so 
Edward Joseph Chisholm, Jr. 
Paul Cook 
Sallie Coolidge 
David Chester Courtney 
Thomas White Crawford 
William Hayes Cunningham 
Anne Danese 
Dennis Daniels 
Eleanor Goddard Daniels 
Deirdre Whittier Davis 
Richard DeMont 
Andrea Louise Doherty 
Christopher M. Doughty 
Patricia Weld Emmons 
Janet Evangelista 
Susan Farley 
Sidney Faulkner 
Rebecca Howe Fernald 
John Brand French, Jr. 
Wendy Marie Gary 
Richard Kelvin Gerson 
Peter Douglas Gordon 
Christopher Gounaris 
John Harrington Grabill 
R. Leroy Grason 
Jennifer Greene 
Philip Hastings Grover 
Karla Marie Gustafson 
Michael Ashbaugh Halsey 
David J. Hendrick 
John R. Hester 
Stephen Holland 
John Uno Ingard 
Christopher Michael Jackson 



David Renson James 

William S. Janes 

Thomas Russell Jevon 

Jennifer Ann Kano 

Craig Thompson Kelley 

Betty Kennedy 

Sara Marguerite Kennedy 

Warner Kingsbury 

Andrew Mark Kramer 

Jeffrey H. Lang 

Martha Lawrence 

Carol Ann Leger 

Karl I. Li 

Heather H. D. McCune 

James T. McKennan 

Jeanne Marie Martin 

Steven R. Martini 

Anne Clifton Mason 

Sara Elizabeth Meyer 

Neil H. Moore 

Nicholas Heath Morgan 

Sheila Morgan 

Robin Mount 

Stephen Murphy 

Alaric Naiman 

Ralph E. Newton 

Susan Leah Novak 

Barbara Marie O'Brien, Jr 

Rebecca Knight Outten 

Laura Owirka 

Margaret Stacy Page 

Elaine Mary Parker 

Jennifer G. Peterson 

Julia Moulton Ragan 

Darlene Marie Rando 

Daniel Briggs Raws on 

Douglas Scott Reed 

Holly Warren Reed 

Malcolm Booth Rosenwald 

Teresa B. Ruocco 

Jean Christina Ryer 

Louise Ann Sartori 



132 



Robert E. Saul 

Richard Schroeder, Jr. 

Leslie Hazel Shansky 

William Shea 

Sally Shurling 

Penelope Ann Siler 

Mark H. Stevens 

Gretchen Terrell Stevenson 

Mary Wharton Sturgis 

Lois Tetreault 

Galen M. E. Tinder 

Margret Toler 

Peter Troisi 

Carl Vercollone 

Mirriam Walba 

Roland W. Wales 

Christopher R. Walkey 

Rosalind Marshall Walter 

Walter B. Ward, III 

Sandra B. Warner 

Gary E. Welch 

Karen A. Wilfert 

Victoria Sue Wirsig 

David Cummings Wright 



133 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

SUMMARY SHEET AND PROPOSED 1968 BUDGET 

1968 Budget 

Classification 1967 Budget 1967 Expenses Requested 

ADMINISTRATION 

School Committee Expenses $ 1,575.00 $ 2,334.90 $ 2,081.00 
Salaries - Supt. , Adm. 

Asst., Secretaries 30,825.00 30,845.32 33,070.00 

Office & Supt's Expenses 3,300.00 2,496.55 3,300.00 

$ 35,700.00 $ 35,676.77 $ 38,451.00 

OUT-OF-STATE TRAVEL $ 2,500.00 $ 2,000.01 $ 2,300.00 

INSTRUCTION 

Salaries $569,268.00 $550,507.66 $632,800.00 

Summer Workshop 6,632.00 7,355.00 7,500.00 

Textbooks 5,530.00 6,014.96 6,234.00 

Library 4,581.00 5,571.97 3,600.00 

Supplies & Other Expenses 30,998.00 35,258.55 28,206.00 

$617,009.00 $604,708.14 $678,340.00 

OTHER SCHOOL SERVICES 

Health $ 100.00 $ 73.34 $ 100.00 

Transportation 49,950.00 48,127.72 49,910.00 

Bus Monitors 4,500.00 2,462.33 4,500.00 

$ 54,550.00 $ 50,663.39 $ 54,510.00 

OPERATION & MAINTENANCE OF PLANT 

Custodial Salaries $53,600.00 $ 51,741.24 $ 52,000.00 

Fuel & Utilities 40,100.00 39,006.44 40,900.00 

Supplies & Drayage 5,800.00 6,473.08 6,000.00 

Maintenance 25,964.00 22,736.35 29,278.00 

$125,464.00 $119,957.11 $128,178.00 

ACQUISITION OF FIXED ASSETS $ 11,746.00 $ 11,733.16 $ 12,394.00 

PROGRAMS WITH OTHER SYSTEMS 

Tuition - Special Class $ 3,700.00 $ 900.00 $ 3,700.00 

Tuition - Adult Education 250.00 120.15 250.00 

$ 3,950.00 $ 1,020.15 $ 3,950.00 

GRAND TOTAL $850,919.00 $825,758.73 $918,123.00 

Per Pupil Cost 809.63 785.69 893.99 

FROM: SPECIAL FUNDS 11,745.04 32,861.93 

TOWN APPROPRIATION $839,173.96 $885,261.07 

* Anticipated Income from Tuitions (METCO & Others) $17,237.00 

* Anticipated Reimbursement - Bus Transportation $40,000.00 

* Payable to Town Free Cash 



134 



STAFF ROSTER, JANUARY 1, 1968 



Name 



Position 



Robert L. Filbin 



Joan B. Warren 

Stefan Vogel 

Timothy Rhodes 
Timothy Graves 

Robert A. Leach 

George W. Drake 



Superintendent of Schools 
(Principal, Hartwell School; 
1958-1962; Principal, Smith 
School and Coordinator of 
Instruction, 1962-1963) 

Principal, Hartwell School 
(Teacher, 1951-1962; Acting 
Principal, 1962-1963) 

Principal, Smith School 
(Teacher, 1959-1963) 

Principal, Brooks School 

Principal, 
Hans com Primary School 

Principal, 
Hans com Upper School 

Administrative Assistant 
(Teacher, 1954-1962) 



Appointed 



1963 



1963 

1963 

1965 

1965 

1959 
1962 



SPECIAL STAFF 

Barbara Bennett 
Helen Horn 
Philip J. Reddy 

Albert S. Reed 
Patricia Kinsman 
Ann Matthews 
^Maureen McGrath 
^Catherine Welch 



Director of Music 1958 

Director of Art 1959 
Director of Guidance & 

Pupil Services 1966 

Director of Physical Education 1953 

Social Worker 1967 

Science Specialist 1966 

Speech Therapist 1966 

Speech Therapist 1967 



HARTWELL SCHOOL 



Judith Anderson 
^Elizabeth Bjork 



Teacher 

Math Specialist 



1965 
1958 



135 



Name 


Position 


Appointed 


Rita Blackburn 


Teacher 


1962 


Julia Cole 


Assistant Principal 


1955 


Ally son Crawford 


Teacher 


1964 


Joan Eaton 


Teacher 


1967 


Helen Guichelaar 


Teacher 


1966 


Mary Louise Humphries 


Teacher 


1967 


Kathleen Hunter 


Teacher 


1966 


Phyllis Johnson 


Teacher 


1946 


Mary Kohring 


Teacher 


1965 


Diane Koules 


Art 


1967 


Ann Lessard 


Teacher 


1959 


Margaret McWade 


Teacher 


1964 


Jeanne Morrison 


Teacher 


1964 


Diane F. Nockles 


Teacher 


1956 


*Marianne Palmer 


Teacher 


1964 


Priscilla Rhodes 


Teacher 


1965 


Myrna Schreibman 


Teacher 


1963 


Jane Stewart 


Teacher 


1960 


Phebe Tonseth 


Librarian 


1961 


Lorraine Torode 


Physical Education 


1960 


Jeannie Watson 


Teacher 


1967 


Carol Williams 


Music 


1964 



SMITH SCHOOL 



Andrea Axelrod 
Patricia Benedict 
Angela Cockfield 
Robert Cummings 
Susan Felsenthal 
Sarah Lou Gephart 
Carolyn Green 
Shirley Laman 
Joseph G. Lessard 
Phyllis McKenney 
William F. Miller 
Martha Salisbury 
Nancy Woodward 
Ann Zanghi 



Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Librarian 

Teacher 

Music 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Physical Education 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 



1967 
1967 
1966 
1962 
1967 
1967 
1966 
1967 
1960 
1957 
1967 
1966 
1967 
1964 



BROOKS SCHOOL 



Lance Berger 
Ann Berliner 



Social Studies 
Social Studies 



1964 
1967 



136 



Name 


Position 




Appointed 


*Margot Bloch 


Math 




1967 


Suzanne Brassard 


Science 




1966 


Alfred Callahan 


Manual Arts 




1959 


David Clevenson 


Math 




1965 


Sylvia Feldman 


English, Math 




1965 


*Patricia Gentry 


Typing 




1967 


Steven Greene 


Science 




1967 


Suzy Q. Groden 


English, Latin 




1967 


Louise Howard 


Reading Skills, 


Math 


1966 


Catherine Jones 


Librarian 




1959 


Meredith Jones 


Science 




1965 


Beverley Lord 


French 




1965 


Ruth Mahoney 


Assistant Principal, English 


1958 


Robert McElwain 


French 




1965 


Helen O'Brien 


Reading Skills 




1967 


Ann Par any a 


English 




1949 


Marijane Raymond 


Science, Math 




1967 


Sheila Reid 


Music 




1961 


Elmer Rigelhaupt 


Social Studies 




1967 


Mary Salvucci 


Home Economics 




1955 


Kathleen Severens 


English 




1967 


Sarah Ann Shonk 


Physical Education 


1967 


Ellen Stonehill 


Reading Skills, 


English 


1965 


Robert Treanor 


Art 




1964 



HANS COM PRIMARY SCHOOL 



Josephine Alward 
Marshia Beck 
Judith Black 
Jane Berkowitz 
Patricia Bilodeau 
Sharon Bloomenthal 
Caryl Culp 
Barbara Cunningham 
Margot DuBois 
Ronald Hagopian 
Patricia Hurley 
Linda Horowitz 
Joan Kessel 
Dale Korman 
Terry Lucas 
Elizabeth Moss 



Assistant Principal 

Music 

Librarian 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Special Class 

Physical Education 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Kindergarten 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Kindergarten 



1964 
1967 
1965 
1965 
1967 
1966 
1964 
1965 
1967 
1965 
1964 
1967 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1967 



137 



Name 



Position 



Appointed 



Elizabeth Norden 
Noreen Nolan 
Margaret Permut 
Charlotte Rothstein 
Nola Sheffer 
Ann Tribou 
Lila Wasson 
Claudia Wonitowy 



Art 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Reading Specialist 

Math Specialist 

Kindergarten 

Teacher 

Teacher 



1965 
1967 
1965 
1960 
1965 
1967 
1965 
1965 



HANS COM UPPER SCHOOL 



Jane Anderson 


Teacher 




1965 


*01ive Barr 


Home Economics 




1963 


John F. Brown, Jr. 


Teacher 




1965 


Linda Burgess 


Physical Education 


1965 


Mary Butterfield 


Art 




1963 


Mary E. Carey 


English 




1966 


Roger A. Cederlund 


Math, Science 




1962 


Frank Churchill 


Manual Arts 




1963 


Florence Como 


Teacher 




1967 


Frances Doughty 


Librarian 




1959 


Naomi Goldman 


Teacher 




1967 


Kenneth Greenblatt 


Math 




1959 


Ronald A. Hadge 


Assistant Principal, Math 


1959 


Diana Hyland 


Music 




1967 


Fred Iosue 


Physical Education 


1959 


Lucia Jezior 


French 




1966 


Joan Killilea 


Teacher 




1965 


William Lehto 


Math, Science 




1966 


Candice Marshall 


Home Economics , 


Guidance 


1965 


William Nockles 


Social Studies 




1963 


Geoffrey Piece 


Art 




1966 


Charles Sego 


Music 




1967 


Florence Sullivan 


Teacher 




1963 


Ruth Sundberg 


English 




1959 


Michael Troderman 


Teacher 




1966 


Jan Ugan 


Teacher 




1965 


Deborah Weber 


Teacher 




1967 


Kathleen Woodruff 


Teacher 




1963 



* Part-time teachers 



138 



STAFF MEMBERS - TERMINATED 1967 



Name 



Position 



Appointed 



HARTWELL SCHOOL 



*Jeane Brown 
Linda Holland 
Gail Manners 
Jean A. Murray 

*Adrienne Rubin 
Gretchen Stubbins 



Teacher 

Art 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Remedial Reading 

Teacher 



1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 
1959 
1965 



SMITH SCHOOL 



Julie Cohen 
Ellen Franklin 
Susan Perls 
Benjamin Potter 
George Saia, Jr 



Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Physical Education 



1965 
1965 
1965 
1965 
1964 



BROOKS SCHOOL 



John Carven 
Paula Cohen 
Robert Duncan 
Neil Jorgensen 
Bernard Oster 
*Ann Sutherland 
Elizabeth Thompson 
Joan Walker 
Rebekah Wells 
Lynn Yeamans 



Math 


1965 


Social Studies 


1965 


Social Studies 


1965 


Science 


1961 


Science 


1966 


French 


1961 


English, Social Studies 


1964 


Math 


1964 


Remedial Reading 


1965 


Physical Education 


1965 



HANS COM PRIMARY SCHOOL 



Johanna Bartelink 
Constance Brothers 
Susan Derby 
Nancy Frieden 
Nancy Glynn 
Susan Greeneisen 
Virginia Metzger 
Mary Small 
Joan McK. Walker 



Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Kindergarten 

Kindergarten 

Music 



1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1965 
1966 
1964 
1965 



139 



Name 



Position 



Appointed 



HANS COM UPPER SCHOOL 



Eleanor Bowden 
Sarah Cotter 
Judy T. Davis 
Burr ill Hansen 
Barbara Morris 
Jane Rivkin 
Doris Salak 
Ronald Trudeau 
Susan Turkel 
John Watson 
Peggy Wolaver 



Teacher 

Teacher 

Math 

Math, Science 

Teacher 

French 

Teacher 

Music 

Teacher 

Music 

Teacher 



1961 
1964 
1966 
1967 
1959 
1966 
1959 
1961 
1966 
1966 
1966 



SPECIAL STAFF 



Arlene Lipworth 
*Muriel Weeks tein 
*Julie Wheelden 



School Psychologist 
Psychological Consultant 
Speech Therapist 



1967 
1966 
1964, 



* Part-time teachers 



140 



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142 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Virginia K. Kirshner, Chairman 
Henry M. Morgan, Vice- Chairman 
Robert W. Bierig 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Richard F. Clippinger 
James M. Jagger 



The School Committee of the Lincoln- Sudbury Regional High 
School continues to strive for the excellence of a quality school 
despite rapidly growing enrollment and rising costs. Chief con- 
cerns of the committee during the past year have been to provide 
a program of studies broad enough to stimulate the wide range of 
talent and ambition among the students and to provide a suitable 
building and equipment to carry on the comprehensive program con- 
sidered necessary. 

The Committee and Mr. Ruliffson, Superintendent-Principal, 
and members of the staff, after reviewing and reaffirming the 
school's educational objectives, have approved expanding the work- 
study and communications skills programs, broadening the indus- 
trial arts program to include electronics, expanding physical edu- 
cation and the athletic program to include football and other 
sports, and providing more kinds of materials and teaching aids 
for classroom teachers through an improved audio- visual and in- 
structional materials center. 

The last major sections of the third building phase, the 
library and the auditorium, were completed during the spring of 
1967. The auditorium was dedicated informally in conjunction 
with the Spring Choral Concert in April. Shortly thereafter, on 
May 15th, the auditorium was the scene of Sudbury's Special Town 
Meeting. The final items on the punch list of unfinished con- 
struction work are now being completed inside the building and 
completion of site work, including the new parking area as well as 
loaming and seeding, is expected by spring. 

At its Annual Town Meeting in March, 1967, Sudbury adopted 
an amendment to the original 1954 agreement which established the 
regional school district. This amendment apportioned the state 
construction aid to the member towns on the basis of each year's 



143 



current enrollment. It had previously been adopted by the Lin- 
coln Town Meeting in November, 1966. 

When school opened in the fall with an enrollment of 1,304 
students, the new look included the nearly completed building, 
plus a system of four Halls, according to the location of home 
rooms within building areas. Each Hall is under the direction 
of a faculty Hall Director. This breakdown of the student body 
into smaller units cuts across class lines and provides more op- 
portunities for participation in school activities and closer con- 
tacts with other students and faculty members. Students fol- 
lowed a new schedule in which some classes met formally four times 
a week instead of five. The number of physical education classes 
was doubled from two to four. This schedule permits Wednesday 
afternoon to be used for staff meetings and facilitates coordina- 
tion of programs among the two elementary districts, Lincoln and 
Sudbury, and the Regional High School. 

The mathematics program of the three systems has been 
studied by staff members and a recommended coordinated program is 
being followed. A coordinator in French is now working with the 
three systems and plans are in progress for a coordinated music 
program. Superintendents of the three systems meet frequently to 
discuss matters of joint concern. 

1967 was a year of transition for the Regional High School. 
Programs and organizational plans were designed to broaden the 
comprehensive nature of the school. Not only did the adminis- 
tration and faculty cope with the problems of rapid growth, but 
they developed and improved the school's program to meet the needs 
and individual differences of its growing number of students. The 
excellence of the school results from the extensive support of the 
two towns in their commitment to quality education, and is a trib- 
ute to the professional ability, loyalty and devotion of an out- 
standing staff. 



144 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Treasurer's Report, December 31, 1967 



Total cash balance, January 1, 1967 



District Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1967 



Receipts : 

Lincoln Assessment 
Sudbury Assessment 
State reimbursement: 

Building construction 

Transportation 
Miscellaneous income 
U. S. Treasury Bills 
Certificates of deposit 
Federal Aid P.L. 864 
Federal Aid P.L. 874 
Gift building construction 
Insurance settlement, building 

construction 

Disbursements : 
Operating budget 
Debt Service - interest 

principal 
U. S. Treasury Bills 
Certificates of deposit 
Building Construction 
Outlay 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield 

Cash balance, December 31, 1967 



$ 340,373.40 
871,653.23 

142,287.78 
73,838.00 
15,479.72 
48,953.89 

600,861.11 

39,543.00 

27,643.00 

600.00 

1,236.18 



$1,153,087.08 

117,300.00 

250,000.00 

48,953.89 

400,861.11 

348,274.07 

9,520.42 

1.68 



$ 445,578.46 



$ 409,227.11 



2,162,469.31 



2,327,998.25 
$ 243,698.17 



Federal Reimbursement Fund, P.L. 864 



Cash balance, January 1, 1967 
Receipts 



Disbursements 

To operating budget 

To Building Construction 

Cash balance, December 31, 1967 



35,543.00 



$ 24,942.93 

14,815.56 

$ 39,758.49 



39,543.00 



215.49 



145 



Federal Reimbursement Fund, P.L. 874 

Cash balance, January 1, 1967 $ 4,645.55 

Receipts 29,107.00 



Federal Reimbursement Fund, P.L. 88-210 



Cash balance, January 1, 1967 
Receipts 



Disbursements 
Cash balance, December 31, 1967 



Athletic Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1967 
Receipts 



$ 33,752.55 

Disbursements $ 925.00 

To operating budget 27,643.00 28,568.00 



Cash balance, December 31, 1967 $ 5,184.55 



Federal Reimbursement Fund, Title I 

Cash balance, January 1, 1967 $ 

Receipts 

$" 

Disbursements 

Cash balance, December 31, 1967 $ 



$ 


671.00 


$ 


671.00 
540.00 


$ 


131.00 



Cafeteria Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1967 $ 5,505.13 

Receipts 55,376.74 

$ 60,881.87 

Disbursements 

Cash balance, December 31, 1967 $_ 



$ 687.50 

Disbursements 524.00 

Cash balance, December 31, 1967 $ 163.50 



146 



Adult Education Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1967 
Receipts 



Disbursements 
Cash balance, December 31, 1967 



Music Scholarship Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1967 
Receipts 



Disbursements 
Cash balance, December 31, 1967 



$ 895.45 

4,225.50 

$ 5,120.95 



$ 1,487.22 



$ 


227.98 
10.35 


$ 


238.33 


$ 


238.33 



Howard Emmons Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1967 
Receipts 



Disbursements 
Cash balance, December 31, 1967 



134.31 



134.31 



134.31 



Total Cash Balance, December 31, 1967 



$258,904.64 



147 



BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1967 



Assets 



Cash 

First National Bank of Boston 
Waltham Savings Bank 

Total Assets 



$258,666.31 
238.33 



$ 258,904.64 



Liabilities and Reserves 



Appropriation balances 
Non- Revenue 

Building Construction #3 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Construction Costs 

Transportation 
Federal Reimbursement 

P. L. 864 

P. L. 874 

Title I 

P. L. 88-210 
Surplus Revenue 
Revolving Funds 

Cafeteria 

Athletic 

Adult Education 

Music Scholarship Fund 

Howard Emmons Fund 



$ 85,928.89 

62,105.28 
73,838.00 

215.49 
5,184.55 
2,441.29 

131.00 
21,826.00 

5,210.78 
163.50 

1,487.22 
238.33 
134.31 



Total Liabilities and Reserves 



$ 258,904.64 



Outstanding Debt 
2.2% School Bonds payable $ 5,000 May 1, 1968-75 inclusive $ 40,000.00 



2.4% School Bonds payable $ 20,000 Nov. 1, 1968-74 inclusive 
2.4% School Bonds payable $ 50,000 Nov. 1, 1968-75 inclusive 
3.7% School Bonds payable $ 50,000 May 1, 1968-80 inclusive 
3.1% School Bonds payable $100,000 Feb, 
4.% School Bonds payable $ 25,000 Aug. 

20,000 Aug. 



1, 19&8-85 inclusive 
1, 1968-83 inclusive) 
1, 1984-86 inclusive) 



140,000.00 

400,000.00 

650,000.00 

1,800,000.00 



$3,490,000.00 



George B. Flint, Treasurer 



148 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



SUPERINTENDENT-PRINCIPAL 
Willard A. Ruliffson 



As the Lin co In- Sudbury Regional High School seeks better 
ways of meeting its educational responsibilities, changes in the 
traditional school schedule have necessarily taken place. This 
year, as in the past, the prime reason for altering existing 
practices has been to better serve the students of our two com- 
munities. The philosophy of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High 
School has been, and will continue to be, to provide for all stud- 
ents the kind of education that will help them become the most 
that they are capable of becoming. 

As part of an expanded program for providing better in- 
structional services for staff and students, a new administrative 
position was created - Director of Instructional Services and 
Curriculum Development. The position combines the responsibility 
of instructional services with those of curriculum development. 
This approach will seek in part to provide the kinds of resources 
teachers need to fulfill their curriculum responsibilities. This 
will include an emphasis upon the utilization of various audio- 
visual devices, including microfilm, film loops and video tape 
recorders. Another dimension of this position will be to help 
facilitate cooperation and communication between the three local 
school districts and other educational organizations. The director 
works closely with the Superintendent-Principal and the Administra- 
tive Council in program planning and the evaluations of the total 
educational program. 

A major addition to the structure of the Regional High 
School was the creation of the Hall System. These smaller groups, 
administered by a Hall Director, attempt to provide a more personal 
approach to the educational processes. The Hall System provides 
students with more personal guidance, as well as a closer working 
relationship with teachers. The hall directors were selected 
after careful screening by the Administrative Council and the 
Superintendent-Principal. The qualifications considered in making 
these appointments included the ability to communicate effectively 
with staff, students and parents; a dedication to the philosophy 
and program of the Regional High School; and evidence of administra- 
tive capabilities. It has taken a great deal of hard work and 



149 



careful planning to bring the Hall System into being. The fol- 
lowing individuals were appointed to serve as Hall Directors: Mr. 
Henry Zabierek, Miss Marion Edwards, Mr. Robert Wentworth, and Mr. 
Jerry Poznak. 

A new weekly class schedule was developed which provided 
teachers the much needed time to plan educational experiences for 
all students in cooperation with the elementary and junior high 
schools. Wednesday afternoons have been set aside, as they are 
in the two elementary districts, for curriculum planning. Meet- 
ings were scheduled this year which provided the Regional High 
School faculty an opportunity to exchange ideas and plan coopera- 
tively with teachers from Lincoln and Sudbury. 

The Administrative Council again served as a key leader- 
ship body for the Regional High School. This group has as one 
of its major responsibilities, the task of keeping the curriculum 
of the school updated. Another responsibility of the Council is 
to provide leadership for broad, long-range plans for the school 
system. This group is composed of the Superintendent-Principal, 
Assistant Principal, Guidance Director, Director of Instructional 
Services and Curriculum Development, Business Manager, Department 
Chairmen, and Faculty Advisor of the Student Council. The De- 
partment Chairmen included in the Administrative Council are: 
Mr. Lewis Baldwin, Mrs. Katherine Barton, Miss Ruth Buxton, Mr. 
Frank Heys , Mr. Alexander Marshall, and Mr. Norman Swicker. Mr. 
Raymond Martin served in the absence of Mr. Bramwell Arnold, and 
Mr. Henry Zabierek one-half year for Mr. Paul Mitchell. The 
Student Council advisor is Mr. Bradford Sargent. 

Utilization of New Facilities 



The new addition to the Regional High School has provided 
students with the opportunity to utilize some of the most up-to- 
date equipment and facilities in education today. The humanities 
wing, which houses English, History and Government, provides 
teachers with access to small conference rooms. These confer- 
ence rooms allow teachers the opportunity to further individualize 
their instructional program by dividing classes into smaller groups 
Some of the rooms in the humanities and science wings also have 
movable walls which facilitates team teaching for large group in- 
struction. The new science wing permits a greater amount of 
laboratory work and students now have more space to pursue in- 
dividual laboratory experiments. 

The additional gymnastic space has allowed for the expan- 
sion of the Physical Education program from two to four times a 



150 



week. This has made it possible for the Physical Education De- 
partment to develop a program that allows for greater participa- 
tion by all students. 

The new library is currently providing facilities for addi- 
tional independent study and for the utilization of individual 
audio-visual equipment. Carrels have been equipped with tape 
recorders, microfilm readers, film loop projectors, and films trip 
projectors. As in the past, the school was extremely fortunate 
in securing the services of many interested parents who assisted 
the librarians with the general operation of the library program. 

Curriculum Planning 

In 1967 the Regional High School continued to pursue a policy 
in curriculum planning predicated upon providing all students the 
best possible education. Two of the most promising practices 
were the Communication Skills program and the Work Study program. 
Both programs have helped to keep students from leaving school. 
These programs have also provided the students with the opportunity 
to experience success during the day. Both programs were started 
with only a small number of students but by the fall of 1967 they 
were expanded. The Communication Skills classes currently enroll 
students from all grades. This program also receives assistance 
from a Reading Specialist funded through a Federal grant. 

The Work Study Program concluded the year with over 25 
seniors participating in this work-experience program which enables 
them to have on-the-job training in nearby .firms. All of the 
students enrolled also carry a full academic load. Future plans 
call for the inclusion of sophomores and juniors. 

A major addition to the athletic program was the inclusion 
of football for the first time at the Regional High School. Over 
one hundred freshman and sophomore boys tried out for the team. 
Uniforms were issued to 48 boys. The football team will go into 
junior varsity competition in 1968. 

One of the newer programs instituted by the Mathematics De- 
partment was the teaching of computer mathematics to advanced 
juniors and seniors. The course involved the techniques of 
translating, programming, and processing a wide variety of mathe- 
matical problems into the language of automatic digital computers. 

The Mathematics, Music and Foreign Language Departments were 
all involved in developing articulated programs with our two ele- 



151 



mentary districts. Members from each of these departments from 
all three systems, served on various committees which were charged 
with the responsibility of proposing various methods for improving 
the coordination and cooperation between all systems. 



152 



SUMMARY POST- SECONDARY EDUCATION OF THE CLASS OF 1967 

Schools 
Four-year Degree Granting Colleges 
Junior Colleges 
Business/Secretarial Schools 
Preparatory/Post Graduate Schools 
Nursing Schools (Diploma) 
Specialized/Technical Schools 



Number 


Percent 


111 * 


49.9 


29 * 


12.5 


5 


2.3 


8 


3.5 


3 


1.3 


15 


6.7 



171 



76.3 



SUMMARY OF OCCUPATIONS OF THE CLASS OF 1967 



Employed 
In offices 
In retail trade 

In construction and maintenance 
In industry 
At home 
Armed Forces 
Married 
Moved 



Number 


Percent 


15 


6.7 


6 


2.7 


6 


2.7 


10 


4.4 


2 


0.8 


5 


2.3 


5 


2.3 


4 


1.8 



53 



23.7 



* These students were placed in 64 colleges and 
9 junior colleges. 



153 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1967 



Peter Lewis Adrian 

Judith Elaine Allen 

John Milton Alley 

James Armstrong, Jr. 

Jeffrey S. Badger 
*Ri chard E. Bautze 

John Carl Becker 

William Paul Bedard 

Paul William Benker 

Donald Fletcher Berry 

Leo Francis Bertolami, Jr. 

Stephen J. Blanchette 

Katharine Suzanne Bogle 

Dorothy Jeanne tte Boles 

Linnea Dorothy Borg 

Geoffrey C. Borgeson 
*Peter Braun 

Timothy P. Brown 

George Uberto Browning, III 

Linda Loraine Budden 

Douglas William Burke 

Gail Christine Burroughs 

Elaine M. Butcher 

John Joseph Byrne, Jr. 

Linda M. Cain 

John Alexander Caputo 
+David Laurence Caras 

Richard Stephen Cavicchio 

Marilyn Janet Chase 

Herbert Neil Chellis , Jr. 

Alexandra Cherau 
+Margaret Tillinghast Church 

Lawrence Anthony Ciampi 

Michael Edward Claffey 

Alyson L. Clark 

Robert M. Clark, Jr. 

Leslie James Clements 

Anne Clippinger 

Catharine C. Cobb 

Marcia Louise Coffey 

Alexandra Conley 

Judith Anne Connolly 

Candace R. Crowell 

James Frederick Cunningham 



Louise Decker Cutting 

Michael V. D'Amato 

Alfred A. Daprato 

James Robert Darby 

Pamela Jean Davis 

Diane Doris Day 

Nancy E. Denny 

Judith Ann Devoe 

Jonathan Douglas Donaldson 

Bradford Lloyd Douty 

Richard Walter Driscoll 

Mary Grace Early 

Robert T. Elliott 
*Eleanor Bradlee Emmons 

John Frederic Eppling 

Nancy Joanne Farrell 

Ann Lee Ferrick 

Maureen Finnerty 
*Dennis Michael Flaherty 

Glenn Tomas Forsyth 

J. Alan Foster 

James Bruce Pbust 

Barbara Jean Frye 

George A. Fullerton 

Joanne Marie Gagne 

Mark Randall Gainer 

Dorothy M. Gajewski 

Pamela Jean Garavano 

Ronald James Gedrim 

Harvey W. Gendreau 

Mary Ann Gentile 

Nancy B. Gilfoy 

Sally Elizabeth Goodwin 
*Elliott Vincent Grabill, Jr 

Robin Gras 

Florence Louise Grasty 

David Jeffrey Greenawalt 

Donna Christie Grey 

Susan Paula Grierson 

Pamela Lee Guiles 

Patricia Dianne Guiles 

Sabra Isabel Haden 

Charles Paul Hagenian 

Kathleen Ellen Hagerty 



154 



Gregor Milton Hamm 

June Amelia Hanson 

Robert H. Hanson 

Grace L. Haroutunian 

Gary Wade Harris 
*Patricia Carol Haswell 
^Leslie Ann Hathaway 

John Christopher Hennessy 

Douglas Stuart Herrick 

Stephen Wesley Hildreth 

Margaret Mary Hill 

Susan Dorothy Hoops 

Karen Hopkins 

Beverly Hinkle 

Steven Harry Hughes 

Deborah Lee Jeffery 

Judith Ann Johnson 

Raymond L. Johnson, Jr. 

Robert James Jordan 

Mark Ellis Jozwicki 

Murray Burke Kahler 

Deborah Wing Kelley 

Patricia Nan Kelley 
*Elizabeth Randall Kindleberger 

Harold E. Klee , Jr. 
*Eleanor Seton Kline 

Kathy Anne Kowal 

Thomas Steven Kusleika 

Carl Dennis Lagrassa 

Angela Elizabeth Lawrence 
*Carol Sana Lee 

Mary Linda Leger 

Janet Frances Lennon 

Ruth Ann Linstrom 

E. Weston Littlefield, III 

Andrea Freud Loewenstein 

Barbara Ann Lordi 

Carolyn Marie Lottatore 
*Donna Marie Catherine Loveys 

Tilman Lukas 
*Gordon Waite Lukesh 

Susan Alcott Lummus 

Mark William Lupien 

Susan Lutts 

Elizabeth Jane Maclnnis 

Burnard L. E. Malloy 

Jeanne Ellen Malonson 

Linda May Mann 



Wendy Ann Martin 

Ivan Antonio Martinez 
*Kim Coral Mathiasen 

Stephen Leo Maurer 

Kathleen McCart 

Kathleen Margaret Mclndoe 
*Douglas Frederick McMurtry 

Linda Morabito 

Karen Geraldine Morely 

Ellen Starr Morgan 

Kathleen Anne Morris 

James Robert Nash 
"Beth Justine Navon 

Elizabeth Anne Caswell Newton 

Sandra Grey Nilo 
*Jeffrey Alan Nims 

Susan Ann Norton 

Thomas Francis Norton 
*Ann Robin Novak 

Vasco E. Nunez, III 

Mary Ann O'Brien 

Patricia Lynn O'Connor 

Maryke Overbeek 

Richard Leon Paradise 

Margaret Linda Partington 

Jeanne Marie Perkins 

John Beecher Perry, III 

Richard Norman Peterson 

Allan Loring Pickman 

Daniel John Place 

Dorothy L. Place 

George I. Place 

Robert E. Podsen, Jr. 

Dennis Paul Porter 
^Katharine Munro Preston 

Martha Ann Rajcok 

Edward Arthur Rappoli 

Susan Lindell Rasi 

Betsy A. Reynolds 
*Ann Rhodes 
^Gregory John Rice 

James D. Riess 
*Mary Gayle Riordan 
*H. Rebecca Ritchie 

Stephanie Karen Ruffin 

Meredith Ellen Russell 

Robert Jay Schaffner, Jr. 

Helen Ruth Scharfenberger 



155 



*Karl Belton Schmalz 

Lee Ellen Schofield 

Mark King Scott 

Margaret Leslie Seay 

Robert Logan Self 

Leslie Ann Sheets 

Gerald H. Sherman 

Larry David Shewan 

Marcia Marie Shields 

Deborah Jean Siler 

Sandra L. Silva 

Karen Lee Simone 

John Clark Sims , III 

Gerald Norris Smith 
^Stephanie Smith 

June Arliene Spiller 

Amantha Jean Stacy 

Deborah Ann Sykes 
^Pamela Elizabeth Thayer 

William A. Titus, Jr. 

Deborah Townsend 

Joseph Ben Travers 

Lynda Mary Urgotis 

Francis J. Vanaria, Jr. 

Willemin Hendrika Cornelia Van Beek 

Charles Joseph Vinciulla, Jr. 

Christine A. Vinciulla 

Joanna Louise Walker 

Walter Fletcher Watton, II 

Pamela Ann Western 

Bruce E. White 

Ronald Albert Wilfert 

Deborah Jeanne Wilkinson 

John Paul Williams 

Carol Elizabeth Wilson 

Richard Malor Wright 






* Cum Laude Society 
+ In Absentia 



156 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
Regional District Operating Expenses 



1967 



1968 Budget 



Funds Available 



Appropriation, 
Contingency 



salaries and expense 



SI 



133,465.00 
23,000.00 



$1,358,816.00 



$1,156,465.00 $1,386,016.00 



Expenditures 



Adminis tration 
School Committee 
Superintendent's Office 



2,400.56 
50,706.62 



2,650.00 
55,980.00 



Instruction 
Supervision 
Principals 
Teaching 
Textbooks 

Library and Instructional Services 
Audio Visual 
Guidance Services 



34,320.52 
647,482.03 
17,556.66 
29,461.62 
9,642.51 
60,111.06 



15,130.00 
40,946.00 
761,921.00 
19,476.00 
29,156.00 
12,504.00 
70,003.00 



Other School Services 
Attendance 
Health Services 
Pupil Transportation 
Food Services 
Student Body Activities 



550.00 

11,329.34 

85,672.90 

3,933.28 

18,857.57 



550.00 

14,928.00 

106,690.00 

4,800.00 

18,701.00 



Operation and Maintenance of Plant 
Operation of Plant 
Maintenance of Plant 

Fixed Charges 

Employees' Retirement 
Insurance Program 

Programs with Other Systems 

Vocational Tuition and Transportation 
and Special Class Tuition 



Apportionments 



102,269.16 
43,290.46 



8,490.00 
20,392.70 



109,222.00 
54,210.00 



10,850.00 
23,129.00 



$1,153,087.08 $1,358,816.00 



Total Budget 
Contingency 

Less : Available Rinds in 

District Treasury 
Balance to be Apportioned 
Lincoln Apportionment 
Sudbury Apportionment 



$1,133,465.00 $1,386,016.00 

23,000.00 27,200.00 

$1,156,465.00 $1,386,016.00 



169,122.32 
987,342.68 
278,338.85 
709,003.83 



$1,265,545.24 
321,654.26 
943,890.98 



157 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

School Organization and Staff 

January 1, 1968 



School Committee 



Virginia K. Kirshner, Chairman 
Henry M. Morgan, Vice Chairman 
Robert W. Bierig 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Richard F. Clippinger 
James M. Jagger 



Term expires 1969 

Term expires 19 70 

Term expires 1968 

Term expires 1969 

Term expires 1970 

Term expires 1968 



Superintendent-Principal 



Willard A. Ruliffson 



Office, 390 Lincoln Road, Sudbury 443-9961 

259-9527 



Business Manager and Secretary to School Committee 
Lily T. Spooner 443-9961 

District Treasurer 



George B. Flint 



259-8611 



Professional Personnel 



Robert E. Millett 
Harold Rosen 
Sidney E. Kaz 



Kathleen M. Abbott 
Betty Jane Adrian 
Bramwell B. Arnold 
Barbara M. Athy 
Ouida L. Bailey 
Lewis K. Baldwin 
Katherine D. Barton 
Andria R. Beacock 



APPOINTED 




1960 


Assistant Principal 


1966 


Guidance Director 


1967 


Director of Instructional 




Services and Curriculum 




Development 


1965 


Business 


1961 


Counselor 


1956 


On leave of absence 


1964 


Physical Education 


1964 


Biology 


1961 


Physical Education 


1956 


Home Economics 


1967 


English 



158 



Francis E. Bellizia, Jr. 
Linda M. Bellotti 
Maureen K. Beringer 
Doreen V. Blank 
John B. Bowdoin 
Barbara S. Brannen 
Cecile T. Brault 
David B. Bronson 
Patricia Brown 
Dorothy Bruce 
Betty Jane Busiek 
Ruth M. Buxton 
Patricia D. Clark 
Betsy Colby 
Miriam S. Coombs 
James L. DeSimone 
Anna B. Duncan 
Vicki A. Edelmann 
William J. Edmonds 
Marion F. Edwards 
Robert Fittante 
Elizabeth M. Flynn 
William B. Galvin 
Steven R. Goldberg 
Mark G. Gulesian 

Coleman P. Gorham 

Marylin C. Haley 

Frank Heys , Jr. 

Thomas B. Hooper 

George L. Horton, III 

Richard J. Johnson 

Elise A. Klein 

Gerald N. Kriedberg 

Joseph D. Krol 

Edward F. Leary 

Philip G. Lewis 

Adair E. Linn 

Priscilla T. Lockwood 

Reba Luke 

John S. MacKenzie 

Richard F. Magidoff 

Hugh P. Maginnis 

Lydia A. Mailhot 

Alexander G. Marshall, Jr 

Raymond S. Martin 



APPOINTED 




1965 


English and Reading 


1967 


Mathematics 


1967 


Earth Science 


1967 


History 


1958 


On leave of absence 


1964 


Home Economics 


1966 


French 


1966 


English 


1967 


Art 


1966 


Art 


1966 


Biology and Chemistry 


1956 


Latin 


1967 


French 


1967 


Mathematics 


1956 


English 


1966 


German and Spanish 


1967 


Biology 


1963 


Physical Education 


1965 


Instrumental Music 


1956 


Biology 


1967 


Remedial Reading 


1966 


Mathematics 


1959 


Mathematics 


1966 


History 


1961 


English, Audio Visual 




Coordinator 


1966 


Counselor 


1967 


Home Economics 


1957 


English 


1967 


English 


1966 


Physical Education 


19 58 


Business 


1966 


French 


1967 


Counselor 


1961 


German 


1960 


On leave of absence 


1962 


On leave of absence 


1966 


History 


1966 


Earth Science 


1967 


Librarian 


1961 


Physical Education 


1967 


History 


1967 


Counselor 


1965 


English and Latin 


1956 


Mathematics 


1960 


Chemistry 



159 



APPOINTED 



Terry F. Miskell 


1958 


Mathematics 


Paul B. Mitchell 


1957 


On leave of absence 


James F. Moir 


1966 


Earth Science 


Ann C. Morris 


1967 


History 


Richard G. Murphy 


1966 


History 


Frances H. Ness 


1966 


Biology 


James A. Newton 


1967 


History 


Karen Jo Noble 


1966 


English and Speech 


Thomas J. O'Brien 


1966 


Biology 


Gail Ogilvie 


1967 


Mathematics 


Joseph A. Pacenka 


1965 


Industrial Arts 


Albert S. Palmer 


1964 


Mathematics 


Martha R. Pappas 


1961 


English 


Carl G. Perkins 


1960 


Reading 


Elizabeth D. Pierson 


1966 


English 


David Pimental 


1967 


Art 


Linda J. Pollard 


1966 


English 


Laura S. Pollock 


1957 


On leave of absence 


Jerry Poznak 


1965 


English 


Thomas J. Puchalsky 


1964 


English and Opera 


Dianne E. Pullo 


1966 


Physical Education 


H. Patricia Punchard 


1964 


English 


Nicholas W. Puner 


1967 


History 


Sharon M. Roberts 


1967 


Spanish 


Harriet J. Rogers 


1965 


English, Speech, Drama 


Rita M. Ross 


1967 


Business 


Carol Rudman 


1967 


French 


Bradford H. Sargent 


1962 


History 


Frederic A. Scott 


1961 


Physics 


Sherman P. Spaulding 


1963 


Mathematics 


Norman R. Swicker 


1961 


Industrial Arts 


Elizabeth A. Telfer 


1967 


Spanish 


Edward L. Thibeault, 


Jr. 1967 


Mathematics 


Dorothy F. Tompkins 


1967 


French and Spanish 


Paul J. Walsh 


1958 


Industrial Arts 


Robert G. Wentworth 


1960 


Vocal Music 


Susan Wheatley 


1963 


Librarian 


Elizabeth S. Wood 


1967 


Mathematics 


Henry C. Zabierek 


1958 
Laboratory Technician 


History 



Jane R. Pearson 



160 



Ruth T. Cathcart 
E. Dorothy Borg 
Lois A. Raws on 



Secretaries 



To Superintendent-Principal 

To Assistant Principal 

To Guidance Director 



Other Office Personnel 



Hope W. Baldwin 
Margaret F. Downing 
Diane C. Duck 
June G. Finan 
Marguerite M. Urgotis 



Health Personnel 



Eugenia N. Garavano 

Virginia A. Maenpaa 

Caroline J. McGraw 

Gertrude I. Patterson 



School Physician 



Gordon D. Winchell, M 

Lois M. Natoli, R. N. 

Director of S. P. H. N. A. 
Mary E. O'Connor, R. N. 

School Nurse 



259-8618 
443-2545 
443-9961 



Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 



Alfred C. Derosier 



Custodians and Maintenance 



William L. Long 
William F. McNeill, Sr. 
Raymond 0. Prive 
Oliver Wainio 
Frank J. Ahern 
Richard J. Buteau 
Paul T. Carlman 



Joseph J. Glebus 

Carl W. Hill 

James M. Horan, Jr. 

Robert L. MacGillivery 

Ellsworth M. Oulton 

Kenneth E. Underwood 

John E. Valentino 



Matrons 



Mabel Chisholm 



Eleanor E. Macdonald 



161 



Cafeteria Personnel 

Josephine Dodge, Manager Lorraine Jessing 

Mary R. Blanchette Doris Leach 

Anna E. Boyd Elizabeth Seaver 

Mary Chadwick Norma Vinciulla 

Doris Daniels Rose C. Wright 
Mary C. Grover 

Bus Contractor 

Welles ley Motor Coach Company 



162 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1968-1969 



Labor Day September 2 

Workshops and Staff Orientation September 3, 4, 5 

High School Freshman Orientation September 5 

School Opens - All Classes September 6 

Veterans Day - Holiday November 11 

Thanksgiving Recess (one half day on November 27) November 28, 29 
Christmas Vacation December 23- January 1 

inclusive 
Classes Resume January 2 

Winter Vacation February 17-21 

inclusive 
Spring Vacation April 21-25 

inclusive 
Memorial Day - Holiday May 30 

Classes Close June 20 

Closing of School - Staff June 23-25 

inclusive 



NO-SCHOOL SIGNAL 



In the event of exceptionally severe weather conditions or 
when the transportation system is disrupted, WBZ, WCOP , WEEI , WKOX , 
WNAC , and WSRO will broadcast the no-school announcement between 
7:00 and 8:00 A. M. 

Since weather reports are not always reliable, and since the 
School District desires to render maximum educational service, the 
schools will remain open except in very severe weather. 



163 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Membership by Age and Grade 

October 1, 1967 



Age 
Grade 
9 

10 

11 

12 

PG 



12 



13 



14 



BOYS 



15 



16 



17 



18 



19 



Totals 



147 


23 


3 








180 


7 


132 


33 


1 






173 




2 


125 


19 


2 


1 


149 






6 


103 


30 

1 


2 

1 


141 
2 



Total 



154 



157 



167 



123 



33 



645 



GIRLS 



Age 
Grade 
9 

10 

11 

12 

PG 



12 



13 14 



11 



15 



16 



17 



153 


6 






12 


180 


17 


1 




9 


132 


15 






7 


109 



18 19 



Totals 

171 
210 
156 
122 




Total 



11 



165 195 



156 125 5 
Grand Total 



659 
1304 



TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING OTHER SCHOOLS 
October 1, 1967 

Arlington Technical & Vocational High School 
Marlborough Vocational High School 
Newton Technical High School 
Waltham Vocational High School 
Way land High School, Special Class 

Total Other Schools 



164 



Distribution of Students Between Lincoln and Sudbury 

Lincoln Sudbury Tuition Total 

Regional High School 332 968 4 1304 

Vocational and Special Class 3 6 - 9_ 

335 974 4 1313 



165 



VITAL STATISTICS 



54 births, 52 marriages and 28 deaths have been recorded during the 
year 1967, as follows: 



Date of 
Birth 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



1966 



Sept. 


4 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


17 


1967 


Jan. 


8 


Jan. 


15 


Jan. 


16 


Jan. 


25 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


9 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


22 


Mar. 


16 


Mar. 


30 


Apr. 


9 


Apr. 


11 


Apr. 


11 


Apr. 


19 


May 


17 


May 


28 


June 


6 


June 


12 


June 


12 


June 


15 


June 


17 


June 


20 


July 


2 


July 


4 


July 


17 


July 


18 


July 


20 


July 


25 


July 


25 



Baby Boy Niles 

John William McAuliffe 

Robert Oliver Leaver 



John B. & Muriel L. Niles 
Joseph C. & Shirley M. McAuliffe 
Robert 0. & Barbara S. Leaver 



Christian Munsell Lincoln 
Amy Elizabeth Slafkosky 
John Christopher Calkins 
Geoffrey Warren Kornfeld 
Sarah Honey Buckler 

Jeffrey Allen Lewis 

Amy Jane Roth 

Baby Girl Young 

Elizabeth Rossoni 

Kurt Harrison Moses 

Hannah Alexandra McClennen Charles E. & Hannah T. McClennen 



Edward P. & Kathe Lee C. Lincoln 
Alex R. & Rita A. Slafkosky 
Charles W. & Martha A. H. Calkins 
George R. & Helen C. S. Kornfeld 
Sheldon A. & Marilyn B. L. Buckler 

Allen & Patricia K. M. Lewis 
Charles E. & Betty J. K. Roth 
Niels & Lucy J. Young 
John P. & Paola M. Rossoni 
Edward S. & Marilyn J. P. Moses 



John Buchanan Brown, Jr. 
Bridget Lyn Dougherty 

Jennifer Marie Guarino 
Caron Wendover Smith 
Meredith Toler 
Kevin Joseph Morrissey 

Amy Jeanne Ferguson 
Sarah Diane Haessler 

June Holly Elliott 
Leslie Ann Burt 
William Allan Munroe 
Alexander Morgan Beal 
M. Coleman Horn 
Wendy Andrea Harrington 

Susan Abigail Janes 
Lisa Ann Marsh 
Sarah Abbott Holland 
Andrew Boocock Coburn 
Robert Patrick Malloy 
Mary Elizabeth Corcoran 
Elisa Marie Sartori 



John B. & Ann P. Brown 

Patrick J. & Carroll L. Dougherty 

Guy E. & Frances I. V. Guarino 
Harold & Elizabeth P. H. Smith 
Albert W. & Louise C. 0. Toler 
John N. & Mary F. W. Morrissey 

Charles E. & Phyllis A. Ferguson 
Herbert A. & Diane E. K. Haessler 

Robert H. & Ethel M. T. Elliott 
William F. & Donna L. G. Burt 
William & Mary W. Munroe 
Thomas P., Jr. & Barbara B. Beal 
Michael & Helen C. Horn 
Winthrop W. & Mary A. Harrington 

George S. & Ann P. B. Janes 
Walter & Elsa A. C. Marsh 
Frederick C. & Martha K. Holland 
Arthur L. & Ann M. B. Coburn 
Robert M. , Jr. & Carol E. S. Malloy 
Robert P. & Elizabeth D. Corcoran 
Louis R. & Ruth M. Sartori 



166 



Names 



Residence 



George P. Reiser 
Helena K. Evans 



Brookline, Mass 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Talcott M. Banks 
Ann S. Monks 



Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Leslie S. Wilson 
Linda S. Rorer 



Concord, Mass. 
Acton, Mass. 



Galen Brewster 
Hathaway Tew 



Cambridge, Mass 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Robert B. Caras 
Joyce V. Parsons 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Edward J. O'Neill, Jr. 
Ann B. Con cannon 



Lincoln, Mass. 
South Natick, Mass, 



Gary D. Beck 
Polly A. Towne 



Middleton, Conn. 
Cambridge, Mass. 



George B. Thompson, III 
Gaille C. Perduwyn 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 



Lawrence P. Bucci 
Grace L. Haroutunian 



Marlboro, Mass 
Lincoln, Mass. 



William R. Miller 
Jennifer Cole 



Seattle, Washington 
Lincoln, Mass. 



John P. Howe, III 
Jill B. Olmsted 



Moscow, Idaho 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Paul G. Murphy 
Joan F. Laverty 



Arlington, Mass 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Kenneth L. Grinnell 
Donna M. Johnson 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Holden, Mass. 



Randall W. Hoar 
Patricia N. Kelley 



Lincoln, Mass 
Sudbury, Mass 



Edward P. Hennerberry 
Kathryn M. Shea 



Lexington, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Wayne M. Shurling 
Margaret A. Lombardi 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Sudbury, Mass. 



n>t. 9 



John D. Morris , II 
Susan Brooks 



New York, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



169 



Date of 
Marriage 

Oct. 7 



Oct. 7 



Names 



Lawrence T. Holden, Jr 
Sarah Cannon 



Daniel T. Zeising 
Sandra L. MacFarland 



Residence 



Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Trail Sparta, N. J. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Oct. 21 



Robert J. Nichols 
Judith A. Goddard 



Salem, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Oct. 21 



Thomas D. Hannan 
Helen A. Gilbert 



South Weymouth, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Oct. 28 Donald E. Mesibov 

Frances L. Gandolfo 

Dec. 2 Gary R. Rutherford 
Nancy E. Richmond 

Dec. 16 Carl D. Gainer 
Janet F. Whalen 

Dec. 16 David A. Butler 
Ethel 0. Sawtell 

Dec. 20 Thomas E. Black 
Judith Sinclair 



Watertown, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Holden, Mass. 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Stratford, Conn. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Brookline, Mass. 



Dec. 22 



William I. Chris tensen 
Carol E. Swanson 



Denver, Colorado 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Dec. 23 



Dec. 23 



Thomas W. Scherer 
Virginia A. Hendrick 

Christopher A. Towner 
Myra J. Millard 



Jennings , Missouri 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Winchester, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



DEATHS 



Date of 
Death 

Jan. 8 

Jan. 15 

Jan. 23 

Feb. 23 



Age_ 



Name 



Marion Packard 
William Chadwick 
Catherine (Baskin) Clarke 
Abraham L. Finesinger 



Years 


Months 


Days 


83 


4 


23 


61 


5 


7 


80 


7 


23 


67 


_ 


_ 



170 



Date 


3 


Name 




Age 




Death 


Years 


Months 


Days 


March 


Baby Girl Young 


15 


March 


13 


Edward D. Downing 


66 


5 


17 


March 


18 


Edward MacLeod 


71 


2 


13 


March 


22 


Wilma S. Knowles 


62 


6 


13 


March 


31 


Thomas B. Callahan 


56 


2 


22 


May 


16 


Edith (Whitney) Flint 


91 


5 


16 


May 


28 


Gertrude (Sturgis) Eaton 


67 


10 


23 


May 


30 


Joseph E. Sweeney 


47 


6 


3 


May 


30 


Jeanne H. (Wicka) Sweeney 


45 


- 


- 


June 


15 


Alice (Cox) Peloquin 


72 


- 


- 


June 


17 


Rose A. Norcross 


90 


5 


4 


June 


18 


Helene P. (Gallagher) Dwyer 


64 


5 


3 


July 


1 


Philip M. Patten 


43 


2 


18 


July 


29 


Lawrence T. Ryan 


57 


2 


3 


Aug. 


2 


Charles Butcher 


92 


4 


5 


Aug. 


3 


Robert W. Gray 


62 


- 


- 


Aug. 


8 


Mary E. Corcoran 


- 


- 


15 


Aug. 


11 


Alice (Sinnott) Wilson 


81 


- 


- 


Sept. 


6 


Frank DiCilio 


56 


- 


- 


Sept. 


7 


Eleanor (Fink) Tarbell 


78 


3 


15 


Oct. 


4 


Ruth (Vaughan) Wright 


47 


6 


9 


Nov. 


13 


Mary J . Ryan 


72 


1 


8 


Dec. 


24 


Ella (Etheridge) Rees 


91 


- 


- 


Dec. 


31 


Julia (Swanson) Larrabee 


74 


- 


18 



171 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Abbott, John A. & Diana B. 

Adams, Faneuil 

Adams , John Quincy 

Adams, John Quincy & Lucy D. 

Adams, Ramelle C. 

Adams, Raymond D. & Margaret E. 

Adams, Thomas B. 

Adamson, William M. & Barbara M. 

Adkins , Archibald W. & Dorothea 

Adler, Harold 

Adler, Ivy Ruth 

Algeo , Leo J. & Elaine T. 

Algonquin Gas Transmission Co. 

Allen, Robert L. 

Allen, Robert L. & Carol E. 

Allison, William S. & Caroline P. 

American Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Ammen, David L. & Judith B. 

Amory, Ethel C. 

Anderson, Carl L. & Dorothy A. 

Anderson, Lawrence B. & Rosina DuP. 

Andrews, Francis S. & Dorothy W. 

Andrews, Paul R. & Estate of 

Catherine L. 
Angell, Craig W. & Carolyn G. 
Angelo, Gaspar & Eda Polcari 
Anthony, Arthur J. & Rose M. 
Aprille, Thomas J. & Amelia J. 
Aptekar, Herbert H. & Florence T. 
Aptt, Harry S. & Etta E. 
Armstrong, C. Robert & Peggy M. 
Armstrong, William A., Jr. & Mary H. 
Aschenbrenner , Bert C. & Ann E. 
Ashworth, Harold T. & Irma D. 
Atchley, Dana W. 

Atchley, Dana W. , Jr. & Barbara S. 
Austin, Richard C. & Marcia W. 
Avery, Abigail D. 
Avery, Stuart B. 

Badger, Sherwin C. , Jr. & Mary E. 
Baggs , Arthur, Jr. & Marion S. 
Bailey, Richard B. 
Bailey, Richard B. & Rebecca B. 
Baker, John C. & Elizabeth E. 
Baldwin, Herbert L. & Beatrice A. 
Baldwin, Robert H. & Susan E. 
Baldwin, William H. & Agnes D. 



600 



400 



47,900 
100 



67,300 



200 



150 



150 



34,400 


$ 1,272.80 


3,800 


140.60 




22.20 


26,400 


4,676.80 


74,700 


2,763.90 


29,600 


1,095.20 




14.80 


31,800 


1,176.60 


29,000 


1,073.00 


67,500 


2,497.50 


300 


11.10 


26,400 


976.80 




1,772.30 




3.70 


33,600 


1,243.20 


43,300 


1,602.10 


24,800 


3,407.70 


46,000 


1,702.00 


88,700 


3,281.90 


31,100 


1,150.70 


49,900 


1,846.30 


56,800 


2,101.60 


11,900 


440.30 


56,300 


2,083.10 


54,700 


2,023.90 


9,100 


336.70 


13,300 


492.10 


30,900 


1,143.30 


17,300 


640.10 


23,800 


880.60 


36,000 


1,332.00 


35,500 


1,313.50 


24,400 


902.80 




7.40 


39,100 


1,446.70 


56,100 


2,075.70 


33,800 


1,250.60 




5.55 


43,400 


1,605.80 


29,600 


1,095.20 


700 


31.45 


47,900 


1,772.30 


9,600 


355.20 


38,300 


1,417.10 


77,500 


2,867.50 


1,900 


70.30 



172 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Ballou, Mildred A. 

Balser, Martin & Arienne S. 

Baltrush, William C. & Sarah M. 

Barbarow, Ruth 

Barber, John W. , Jr. & Mary E. 

Barbera, Anthony A. & Eleanor E. 

Bardsley, Theodore J. & Doris A. 

Bare, Bruce M. & Helen S. 

Barkas , Christopher W. & Mary Ann 

Barker, William R. & Barbara S. 

Barnaby, John M. & Charlotte B. 

Barnard, Helen Ogden 

Barnecut, Leo J., Jr. & Alysse M. 

Barnes, Benjamin A. & Ann B. 

Barr, Edgar E. & Olive H. 

Barry, Harold W. & Annabel H. 

Barthel, Walter 

Barthel, Walter & Emma C. 

Bartlett, Nancy W. 

Basile, Angelo & Catherine 

Bastress, E. Karl 

Bastress, E. Karl & Anne W. 

Batter, John F. 

Beach, Daniel M. , III, & Judith C. 

Beal, Thomas P., Jr., & Barbara B. 

Beaton, Daniel R. & Shirley G. 

Beaudette, Joseph, Jr. , & Eleanor B, 

Belanger, Walter E. & Mary F. 

Belcastro, Cynthia D. 

Beldock, George J. 

Belle, Gene & Irene 

Belleau, Thomas & Karen 

Bellizia, Francis E. & Mary H. 

Benesh, Charles L. & TheLma E. 

Bennett, Richard K. & Doris S. 

Benton, Carl R. & Barbara A. 

Bergen, Kenneth W. 

Bergles , Arthur E. & Priscilla L. 

Berman, Donald S. & Edith M. 

Bernardin, George F. & Barbara C. 

Bertolami, Leo 

Billings, Bruce H. & Sarah W. 

Bingham, Elizabeth P. B. 



Birkett, James D. 
Bisbee, Marie E. 
Bishop, Fern W. 
Black, Everett A. 
Blais , George A. 



& Sarah P. 



& Anne E. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 12,700 


$ 469.90 




31,400 


1,161.80 




11,400 


421.80 




9,200 


340.40 




21,500 


795.50 




33,800 


1,250.60 




15,900 


588.30 




35,100 


1,298.70 




26,400 


976.80 




19,200 


710.40 




26,400 


976.80 




31,100 


1,150.70 




45,800 


1,694.60 




39,600 


1,465.20 




34,100 


1,261.70 




5,500 


203.50 




400 


14.80 




23,400 


865.80 




32,800 


1,213.60 




41,000 


1,517.00 


150 




5.55 




56,800 


2,101.60 




37,100 


1,372.70 




23,300 


862.10 




38,200 


1,413.40 




22,300 


825.10 




45,800 


1,694.60 




28,700 


1,061.90 




20,400 


754.80 




15,200 


562.40 




24,500 


906.50 




20,700 


765.90 




27,500 


1,017.50 




37,700 


1,394.90 




21,200 


784.40 




300 


11.10 


300 


65,800 


2,445.70 




21,600 


799.20 




20,100 


743.70 




24,600 


910.20 




23,700 


876.90 




7,900 


292.30 




6,000 


222.00 




18,400 


680.80 




19,500 


721.50 




17,000 


629.00 




135,300 


5,006.10 


1,500 




55.50 



173 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Blais, George A. & Annette C. 

Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 

Bockoven, John S. & Dorothy R. 

Boersner, Wolfram A. & Doris M. 

Bogner, Walter F. & Edith 

Boisvert, Henry A. & Blanche T. 

Bolt, Richard H. & Katherine L. 

Bolton, Stanwood K. & Thalia H. 

Bomengen, Allen & Ethel A. 

Bonaceto, Anthony & Grace 

Bonia, Walter J. 

Booth, Alice Burrage 

Booth, Robert H. 

Boston Gas Company 

Boston Edison Company 

Boston & Maine Railroad 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowles, Estate of William 

Bowman, Edward F. & Doreen W. 

Boyce, Manley B. & Alice M. 

Boyce, Mary M. 

Boyer, Edward 

Boyer, John H. 

Boyer, Louis L. & Elaine T. 

Bradford, Robert L. & Martha A. 

Bradley, Clifford & Jeannette E. 

Bradley, Junia T. 

Brannen, Robert C. & Barbara A. 

Braude, Stephen E. & Bettie J. 

Braun, Morton B. & Esther K. 

Brennan, William L. & Eleanor A. 

Brewster, Ellen Beebe 

Briggs , Susan L. 

Brisson, Norman F. & Evelyn W. 

Bronson, Franklin C. & Catherine M. 

Brooks , Paul 

Brown, Elizabeth G. 

Brown, Joan Nickerson 

Brown, John B. & Ann P. 

Brown, Robert P. & Jeane H. 

Brown, Robert W. & Lee G. 

Browne, Secor D. & Mary D. 

Brownell, Robert G. 

Brownell, Robert G. & Berkes , 

William J. 
Brownell, Robert G. & Ruth M. 
Browning, Estate of George U. 
Browning, Isabelle F. S. & Frances I. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 20,400 


$ 754.80 




1,100 


40.70 


300 


22,700 


851.00 




36,100 


1,335.70 




35,400 


1,309.80 




16,900 


625.30 




56,600 


2,094.20 




24,200 


895.40 




16,300 


603.10 




25,800 


954.60 




27,100 


1,002.70 




2,400 


88.80 




65,100 


2,408.70 


425,000 




15,725.00 


1,169,640 


9,900 


43,642.98 




2,000 


74.00 




25,000 


925.00 




18,200 


673.40 




22,200 


821.40 




57,500 


2,127.50 




28,600 


1,058.20 




63,400 


2.345.80 




5,400 


199.80 




20,100 


743.70 




18,600 


688.20 




10,600 


392.20 




38,200 


1,413.40 




23,700 


876.90 




86,400 


3,196.80 




35,400 


1,309.80 




21,400 


791.80 




100 


3.70 




6,100 


225.70 




25,300 


936.10 




27,100 


1,002.70 


150 


47,200 


1,751.95 




55,300 


2,046.10 




24,500 


906.50 




17,700 


654.90 




15,400 


569.80 




10,500 


388.50 




31,300 


1,158.10 


300 




11.10 




50,200 


1,857.40 




59,500 


2,201.50 




9,200 


340.40 




15,200 


562.40 



174 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Browning, Katherine A. 
Bruce, James D. & Eleanor R. 
Buckler, Sheldon A. & Marilyn L. 
Buerger, Martin J. & Lila 
Bulkley, Joel B. & Doris L. 
Bullard, John A. , Jr. & Margaret 
Burk, George W. & Ruth M. 
Burke , Ruth Bemis 
Burns, Melvin P. & Elizabeth F. 
Burroughs, Eugene 
Burroughs, Eugene L. & June M. 
Burckett, Douglas M. & Phillippa C. 
Burt, William F. & Donna G. 
Burton, William deK. & Priscilla 
Butler, Hector & Audrey Edith 
Butler, William B. & Mary Jane 
Butler, William H. & Nancy G. 
Butts, Louise M. 

Calkins, Charles W. & Thelma E. 

Calkins, Charles W. , Jr. 

Calkins, Charles W. , Jr. & Martha A. 

Calkins, Ramona T. 

Callahan, Thomas R. & Helen T. 

Campobasso, Anthony B. & Dorothy M. 

Campobasso, Joseph R. 

Cannon, Ellen DeN. & Bradford 

Cantella, Anthony J. & Brianne B. 

Cantlin, John H. & Antoinette T. 

Caras , Byron & Anastasia 

Caras , Ophair & Florence L. 

Carley , John A. & Joan Keir 

Carman, John W. & Eleanor T. 

Carney, Florence T. 

Carney, James J. & Agnes M. 

Carr Realty Trust 

Carroll, Donald C. & Lucy J. 

Carroll, Marjory M. 

Carstensen, Warren & Evelyn G. 

Caskey, Walter H. 

Cassidy, Henry J. 

Casner, Nelson T. 

Cassidy, Robert E, 

Cassis, Anthony 

Caswell, John R. & Carol B. 

Cate, Philip T. 

Cate, Philip T. , Jr. & Marjorie W. 

Causer, William 0. & Mary E. 

Chadwick, William & Jessie T. 



& Anna H. 
& Verna E. 

& Isabelle 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 12,400 


$ 458.80 




23,900 


884.30 




39,800 


1,472.60 




42,400 


1,568.80 




45,100 


1,668.70 




34,000 


1,258.00 




19,800 


732.60 




48,000 


1,776.00 




19,200 


710.40 


400 




14.80 




43,100 


1,594.70 




34,500 


1,276.50 




24,000 


888.00 




41,800 


1,546.60 




22,100 


817.70 




22,900 


847.30 




24,200 


895.40 




58,400 


2,160.80 




21,100 


780.70 


5,700 




210.90 




34,800 


1,287.60 




10,100 


373.70 




30,000 


1,110.00 




16,700 


617.90 




13,100 


484.70 




134,500 


4,976.50 




49,200 


1,820.40 




61,300 


2,268.10 




26,400 


976.80 




21,000 


777.00 




40,800 


1,509.60 




22,100 


817.70 




14,700 


543.90 




19,200 


710.40 




78,200 


2,893.40 




46,900 


1,735.30 




18,300 


677.10 




58,900 


2,179.30 




30,000 


1,110.00 




15,200 


562.40 


40 




1.48 




18,800 


695.60 




26,900 


995.30 




27,600 


1,021.20 


300 




11.10 




90,400 


3,344.80 




18,400 


680.80 




22,900 


847.30 



175 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Champeny, John C. & Leona G. 
Chapin, Louise B. & Bertha L. 
Chapin, Margaret E. 
Chapman, James S. & Emily M. 
Charles R. Dexter, Inc. 
Chellis, Herbert N. & Eleanor M. 
Chiotelis, Charles L. & Iasme J. 
Chipman, Robert H. & Mary F. 
Chisholm, Edward C. & Margaret F. 
Chittick, Mary G. & Suesens , 

Eleanor G. 
Chu, Ge Yao & Wei Ying 
Church, Robert T. & Priscilla S. 
Ciampi, Emilio & Mary P. 
Cibel, Stanley A. & Thelma W. 
Ciraso, Amelia 
Clare, Mary E. 

Clark, Clifford A. & Patricia D. 
Clark, Vern & Velma M. 
Clark, William T. & Catharine T. 
Coane, John H. , Jr. 
Coan, Thomas & Catherine M. 
Coburn, Arthur L. , III, & Ann B. 
Coburn, Edward S. 
Codman, Dorothy S. F. M. 
Codman, Dorothy S. F. M. , Tyler, 

Roger B. & Fawcett, Benjamin T. 

Trustees 
Coffey, John B. & Wilma L. 
Coffin, Stewart T. & Jane M. 
Cole, Edwin M. & Lucy F. 
Comerford, John F. & Mary G. 
Comjean, Marc G. & Judith K. 
Comstock, Charles B. & Joan M. 



L. 



Conant , 
Condit, 
Conger 



Lily R. 
Robert P. 
George 



& Doris E. 



Conley , Barclay 

Conlin, James J. & Winifred I. 

Connair, John J. & Ferro, Jacqueline 

Connolly, J. Irving & Evelyn 

Connolly, John Irving, Jr. 

Conrad, Walter C. & Margaret M. 

Conroy , Grace W. 

Constantine, Philip J. 

Cook, Ethel 

Cook, Harry & Kathleen G. 

Cook, Jacqueline H. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 30,800 


$ 1,139.60 




52,100 


1,927.70 




18,100 


669.70 




18,200 


673.40 




5,300 


196.10 




17,200 


636.40 




23,700 


876.90 




20,000 


740.00 




21,300 


788.10 




27,200 


1,006.40 




38,800 


1,435.60 




43,200 


1,598.40 




24,900 


921.30 




24,200 


895.40 




21,200 


784.40 




21,700 


802.90 




68,100 


2,519.70 




19,200 


710.40 




37,500 


1,387.50 




12,700 


469.90 




15,000 


555.00 




25,600 


947.20 




31,500 


1,165.50 




32,000 


1,184.00 




189,900 


7,026.30 




16,600 


614.20 




24,800 


917.60 




40,800 


1,509.60 




24,600 


910.20 




34,300 


1,269.10 




24,200 


895.40 




48,300 


1,787.10 




21,500 


795.50 


650 




24.05 


150 




5.55 




16,100 


595.70 




20,700 


765.90 




8,600 


318.20 




600 


22.20 




3,400 


125.80 




17,800 


658.60 




24,300 


899.10 


1,550 




57.35 




27,200 


1,006.40 




20,300 


751.10 



176 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Cook, John F. & Ethel A. 

Cook, Paul W. , Jr. , & Marian M. 

Coolidge, Henry P. & Alice C. 

Coons, Richard D. & Nancy J. 

Cope, Oliver & Alice DeN. 

Cope, Thomas Pym & Elizabeth W. 

Corcoran, Robert P. & Elizabeth D. 

Cormack, Allan M. 

Corrigan, Anna G. , Admx . 

Corrigan, Leo W. 

Corrigan, Mary 

Corrigan, Mary K. 

Cotoia, Anthony J. & Lucy M. 

Cotoni, Carolana M. 

Courtney, Joseph Donald 

Cousins, Ashley B. 

Cousins, Bessie M. 

Cousins, Estate of Lawrence B. & 

Jeanne B. 
Cowles , Addison & Alexandra C. 
Crandall, Stephen H. & Patricia E. 
Crawford, John D. 
Crawford, John D. & Joanna W. 
Crook, Constance S. 
Crowson, Leslie W. & Madeline W. 
Culver, Perry J. & Kate S. 
Cummings , William R. & Palma M. 
Cunningham, J. Lewis & Ruth P. 
Cunningham, Robert Allen & Margaret 
Cunningham, Robert M. 
Cushman Realty Trust 

Dadmun, Harrie H. & Helen 

Dahl, Thyra 

D'Alleva, Carmine 

D'Alleva, Franco 

Dalli, Francis J. & Mary E. 

Dalrymple, Chester & Jean 

Dalrymple, Sidney C. & Dorothy C. 

Damico, Louise 

Dane, Benjamin 

Dane, Benjamin & Alexandra C. 

Daniels, Bruce G. & Janet B. 

Danosky , Edward A. 

Danosky , Edward A. & Mary C. 

Darling, Eugene M. , Jr. 

D'Arrigo Brothers Co. of Mass. 

d'Autremont, Chester 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 11,900 


$ 440.30 




38,300 


1,417.10 




41,300 


1,528.10 




58,800 


2,175.60 




34,600 


1,280.20 




31,700 


1,172.90 




40,200 


1,487.40 




3,800 


140.60 




15,900 


588.30 




11,100 


410.70 




35,300 


1,306.10 




10,400 


384.80 




31,500 


1,165.50 




20,200 


,747.40 




17,500 


647.50 




10,200 


377.40 




20,400 


754.80 




28,300 


1,047.10 




19,900 


736.30 




44,900 


1,661.30 


300 




11.10 




35,800 


1,324.60 




18,000 


666.00 




28,000 


1,036.00 




74,700 


2,763.90 




26,200 


969.40 




21,200 


784.40 




36,900 


1,365.30 




23,800 


880.60 




3,500 


129.50 




44,300 


1,639.10 




21,100 


780.70 


1,330 




49.21 


1,800 




66.60 




40,800 


1,509.60 




54,400 


2,012.80 




44,200 


1,635.40 




23,200 


858.40 


100 




3.70 




68,400 


2,530.80 




51,200 


1,894.40 




6,900 


255.30 




20,100 


743.70 




30,500 


1,128.50 




14,200 


525.40 



177 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



d'Autremont, Chester C. & Ruth W, 

Davidson, Robert W. & Cynthia A. 

Davis , Alfred M. 

Davis, D. Bradford & Barbara G. 

Davis, Henry R. , Jr. 

Davis , Jacqueline 

Davis, Prescott 

Ronald C. & Barbara C. 



Saville R. & Anita V. 

Sherman 

Sherman P. & Phyllis M. 



Davis 

Davis 

Davis 

Davis 

Davis, William H. 

Davison, Alice P. 

Dawes, Donald L. & Ruth K. 

Day, Mildred 

Dean, Emma W. 

Dean, Wendell A. & Maybelle L. 

Dean, William M. 

Dean, William M. & Lorraine C. 

Debrecini , Theodore G. & Lois H. 

DeCilio, Frank W. & Josephine 

Dee, Helena A. 

DeFord, William & Elinor S. 

DeJesus, John & Geneva Ann 

Demone , Harold W. & Elsie R. 

Denehy , Edward J. & Bernadette J. 

Denholm, A. Stuart & Jane Leslie 

Denis e vi ch , He len 

DeNormandie , James, Executor 

DeNormandie , James 

DeNormandie, James & Martha 

DeNormandie, James, Cannon, Ellen DeN. 

& Cope, Alice DeN. 
Derderian, Edith H. 

desCognets, Archer B. & Gwendolyn G. 
Dewey, Chauncey P. 
Dewey, Chauncey P., Jr. & Reed S. 
Dewey, Davis R. , II 
Dexter, Barbara C. 
Dickey, Dana H. & Emy P. 
Dickie, Richard I. & Julia G. 
DiGiovanni, Guy P. & Teresa E. 
Diminico, Louis & Antonetta 
Dixon, George M. & Anna R. 
Dixon, Russell J. & Theresa J. 
Doherty, Elizabeth H. 
Doherty, Mary E. , Margaret A. & 

Mar jorie 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 75,700 $ 


2,800.90 




12,500 


462.50 




19,600 


725.20 




31,300 


1,158.10 


200 




7.40 




18,100 


669.70 




72,500 


2,682.50 




21,600 


799.20 




41,000 


1,517.00 


100 




3.70 




16,200 


599.40 




18,900 


699.30 




50,100 


1,853.70 




18,900 


699.30 




9,800 


362.60 




15,300 


566.10 




35,900 


1,328.30 




6,500 


240.50 




15,900 


588.30 




100 


3.70 




23,300 


862.10 




18,500 


684.50 




38,100 


1,409.70 




27,500 


1,017.50 




32,200 


1,191.40 




46,200 


1,709.40 




39,800 


1,472.60 




28,600 


1,058.20 




74,700 


2,763.90 




115,200 


4,262.40 




85,400 


3,159.80 




28,300 


1,047.10 




15,400 


569.80 




51,000 


1,887.00 


150 




5.55 




34,000 


1,258.00 


150 


77,600 


2,876.75 




66,500 


2,460.50 




19,300 


714.10 




21,900 


810.30 




25,700 


950.90 




48,400 


1,790.80 




2,100 


77.70 




26,100 


965.70 




44,100 


1,631.70 



16,600 



614.20 



178 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Jr. , Adm. 
Jr. 

Jr. , Malcolm L. , 
Charlotte L. 



Doherty's Garage, Inc. 
Domenichella, Domenic 
Domenichella, Mattie M. 
Donaldson, Estate of Charlotte 
Donaldson, Gordon A. & Elizabeth A. 
Donaldson, Malcolm L. 
Donaldson, Robert D. 
Donaldson, Robert D. 
Donaldson, Robert D. 

Donald P. , Gordon A. 

& Peck, Jean E. 
Donnell, Samuel 
Donnell, Samuel H. & Marion L. 
Donovan, Leo A. & Elinor C. 
Dorian, Newart 

Dougherty, Allen R. & Helen M. 
Dougherty, Mary Grace, Admx. 
Doughty, Joseph 
Doughty, Joseph M. & Martha L. 
Dow, Sterling, III, & Eleonore P. 
Downing, Grace L. 

Drake, Lillian W. & Garmory , Bertha V. 
Drew, Frederic T. & Shirley D. 
Dreyfus, Pierre M. & Dorothy R. 
Duane , Jerome J. & Rosalind Gail 
DuBois , Anson M. & Olive S. 
Duffy, James E., Ill, & Barbara G. 
Durnan, John P. & Leona E. 
Dustin, Daniel E. & Rachel S. 
Dwyer, James L. & Carol 
Dwyer, Warren R. & Marilyn H. 



East, Edla 
Eaton, Richard J. 
Eckhardt, Homer D 
Edens , Delford W. 
Edmonds, Dean S., 
Ehlert, Caroline 



& Gertrude S. 
. & Mary G. 

& Laureine A. 

Jr. , & Louise W. 
E. 



Elder, George D. & Diana H. 
Elliott, Robert H. & Ethel M. 
Elliott, William G. & Peggy P. 
Ellis, Eloise G. 
Emerson, Claire G. 
Emmons , A. Brad lee 
Emmons, A. Bradlee & Judith Reed 
England, Albert E. & Priscilla S. 
Eppling, Frederic J. & Sarah J. 
Erickson, Leonard V. & Martha F. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


1,020 


$ 43,100 


$ 1,632.44 




2,500 


92.50 


2,220 


46,800 


1,813.74 




30,000 


1,110.00 




41,600 


1,539.20 




28,000 


1,036.00 




199,000 


7,363.00 




20,000 


740.00 




28,700 


1,061.90 


100 




3.70 




37,000 


1,369.00 




63,500 


2,349.50 




16,900 


625.30 




14,800 


547.60 




1,800 


66.60 


100 




3.70 




16,800 


621.60 




15,100 


558.70 




16,600 


614.20 




17,800 


658.60 




12,900 


477.30 




38,400 


1,420.80 




39,600 


1,465.20 




18,600 


688.20 




31,500 


1,165.50 




23,600 


873.20 




25,900 


958.30 




17,400 


643.80 




22,400 


828.80 




21,000 


777.00 




36 , 100 


1,335.70 




28,100 


1,039.70 




57,200 


2,116.40 




67,800 


2,508.60 




17,900 


662.30 




30,500 


1,128.50 




22,900 


847.30 




64,400 


2,382.80 




49,100 


1,816.70 




20,600 


762.20 


100 




3.70 




49,500 


1,831.50 




50,700 


1,875.90 




22,600 


836.20 




17,800 


658.60 



179 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Ericson, Herbert E. & Erlyne R. 
Ernst, Martin L. & Lois 0. 
Eshleman, Dean B. 
Evangelista, Florenzo T. 
Evangelista, Florenzo T. & Dorothy L. 
Evans, Lucius W. & Cynthia F. 

Faddoul, George P. & Natalie A. 

Faran, James J. & Ellen G. 

Farbish, Alfred B. & Rita F. 

Farley, Louis C. 

Farley, Louis C. , Jr., & Isabel K. 

Farrell, Philip J. & Ruth E. 

Faunce, Anthony 

Faunce, Mary Gill & Anthony 

Felegian, Peter & Marion 0. 

Fenijn, Chris J. & Yvonne 

Fenton, Dean E. & Barbara L. 

Ferguson, Charles E. & Phyllis G. 

Fernald, George H. , Jr., & Eleanor T. 

Field, Rosamond R. 

Filbin, Robert & Eva M. 

Fillmore, Bruce R. & Eleanor L. 

Finesinger, Abraham L. 

Finesinger, Abraham L. & Natalie 

Finnerty, James J. & Anna C. 

Fiorelli, Ernest R. & Rose M. 

First National Bank of Boston, 

Trustee, One Federal Real 

Estate Trust 
Fischer, Julian D. & Tatiana P. 
Fisher, John W. 
Fitch, Marion A. 
Fitts, Estate of Charles K. & 

Gertrude W. 
Fitzgerald, John H. & Thelma C. 
Flaherty, Augusta D. 
Flannery, Donald J. & Harriet E. 
Flannery, Ralph & Constance H. 
Flansburgh, Earl R. & Louise H. 
Fleck, James D. & Margaret E. 
Fleck, Richard C. & Frances R. 
Fleming, Clifford D. & E. Frances 
Flewelling, Roy S. & Thelma G. 
Flint, Edith F. 
Flint, Edward F. & Henry R. 
Flint, George B. & Lucie S. 
Flint, Josephine R. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 31,100 $ 


1,150.70 




55,000 


2,035.00 




13,600 


503.20 


100 




3.70 




16,500 


610.50 




69,800 


2,582.60 




26,000 


962.00 




36,500 


1,350.50 




25,100 


928.70 


100 




3.70 




25,200 


932.40 




28,600 


1,058.20 


150 




5.55 




50,000 


1,850.00 




27,700 


1,024.90 




26,700 


987.90 




22,400 


828.80 




25 , 100 


928.70 




67,500 


2,497.50 




19,200 


710.40 




18,400 


680.80 




17,700 


654.90 




6,800 


251.60 




73,300 


2,712.10 




21,800 


806.60 




30,600 


1,132.20 




22,000 


814.00 




33,300 


1,232.10 




33,700 


1,246.90 




72,300 


2,645.50 




63,300 


2,342.10 




25,000 


925.00 




33,800 


1,250.60 




12,200 


451.40 




28,200 


1,043.40 




38,100 


1,409.70 




8,900 


329.30 




44,800 


1,657.60 




24,800 


917.60 




30,000 


1,110.00 




7,100 


262.70 




25,600 


947.20 




19,500 


721.50 




30,400 


1,124.80 



180 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 18,500 


? 684.50 


450 


60,300 


2,247.75 




26,800 


991.60 




24,100 


891.70 




20,700 


765.90 




40,600 


1,502.20 




30,500 


1,128.50 




36,300 


1,343.10 




22,800 


843.60 




51,200 


1,894.40 




23,500 


869.50 




33,600 


1,243.20 




34,900 


1,291.30 




10,100 


373.70 


700 




25.90 




23,400 


865.80 




37,300 


1,380.10 




36,600 


1,354.20 




23,100 


854.70 




27,700 


1,024.90 




27,000 


999.00 




31,600 


1,169.20 




41,900 


1,550.30 


100 




3.70 




56,400 


2,086.80 




21,600 


799.20 




23,500 


869.50 




17,200 


636.40 




34,600 


1,280.20 




20,200 


747.40 




13,700 


506.90 




19,100 


706.70 




13,900 


514.30 




12,000 


444.00 




27,500 


1,017.50 




32,200 


1,191.40 




18,700 


691.90 




1,200 


44.40 


300 




11.10 




28,900 


1,069.30 




5,800 


214.60 




47,000 


1,739.00 




17,100 


632.70 




67,000 


2,479.00 




9,500 


351.50 


30 




1.11 




42,600 


1,576.20 



& Annabel Otis 



Flint, Margaret S. 

Flint, Warren F. 

Floyd, Olive B. 

Flynn, Helen C. 

Foley, Harold F. & Rita E. 

Foley, Harold W. 

Forbes, Sherman H. 

Fougere, Guy L. & Pamela J. K. 

Foust, James T. & Dorothy B. 

Frank, Robert C. & Velma S. 

Fraser, Robert M. & Donna A. 

Freed, Charles & Florence W. 

French, John B. & Deborah C. 

Frost, Wesley T. & October C. 

Frullo, Frank 

Fryatt, Thomas F. 

Fullerton, Albert L. , Jr. & Mary S. 

Gagne, Lawrence E. & Dorothy Q. 

Gajewski, Ceslaus A. & Sophie 

Gandolfo, Matthew F. & Frances L. 

Garrison, David L. & Alice E. 

Garrison, Edith S. 

Garrison, John B. & Barbara F. 

Gary , John 

Gary, John E. & Maida F. 

Gatchell, G. Gordon, Jr. & Esther A 

Gentile, Joseph F. & Kathleen E. 

Gergen, Kenneth J. & 

Gerson, Nathaniel C. 

Gheith, Mohamed A. & 

Gilbert, Francis 

Gilbert, George H. & Rebecca A. 

Gilbert, John W. & Josephine L. 

Gilbert, Mary J. 

Giles, John R. & Sarah H. 

Gilfoy, Donald A. 

Gillis, John G. & Maria F. 

Giurleo, James M. & Mary C. 

Glass , John B. 

Glass, John B. & Florence M. 

Glazin, Allan I. & Evelyn F. 

Gleason, Nancy W. J. 

Goddard, Richard B. & Alice L. 

Goodwin, Herbert F. & Elizabeth D. 

Gordon, Charles W. & Frances L. 

Gordon, Mary S. 

Gordon, Robert D. & Nancy M. 



Eleanor C. 
& Sareen R. 
Dorothy A. 



181 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Gounaris , Thomas X. & Jean G. $ 

Grabill, Elliott V. & Martha L. 

Graf, Malcolm 

Grande, Orlando S. & Rose P. 

Gras, Ranulf W. 400 

Gras, Ranulf W. & Annette E. 

Grason, Rufus L. & Edna B. 

Gray, Robert W. 

Greaves, Allan W. & Theresa D. 

Green, Robert T. & Catherine M. 

Greene, Frederick H. , Jr. & Helen H. 

Gregg, Earl F. & Doris H. 

Griggs, Thomas 

Grim, William M. , Jr. & Barbara M. 

Grinnell, William L. & Virginia B. 

Gropius , Walter & Use 

Gross, Thomas A. 0. & Judith C. F. 

Grover, C. Stuart & Gunilda G. 

Guarino , Guy E. & Frances I. 

Gunaris , Theodore & Rheta D. 

Gurski, Richard J. & Harriett A. 

Gustafson, Craig S. & Louise M. 

Guy, Donald C. & M. Cynthia 

Haartz, John C. , Jr. & Beatrice R. 

Haden, Russell 20 

Haden , Russell L. , Jr. & Constance J. 

Haessler, Herbert A. & Diane F. 

Hagenian, Joseph C. & Irene R. 

Hagmann, Otto 

Hagmann, Otto & Katherine 

Hagopian, Richard G. & Helen 

Haley, Whitney W. & Barbara 

Hall, Cecil E. & Nancy E. 

Hall, Henry P. 100 

Halsey , William A. & Leila W. 

Hamilton, Harry A. & Bessie E. 

Hankey , Francis W. & Edna J. 

Hanlon, Catherine L. 

Hannemann, Roger W. & Marion N. 

Hannon, William H. , Jr. & Louise E. 

Hanson, Adler M. & Madeline A. 

Hapgood, Norman, Jr. 150 

Hapgood, Norman, Jr. & Ruth K. 

Hardy, Harriet L. 

Harney, Gregory G. , Jr. & Elizabeth E. 

Haroian, Henry & Jessie S. 

Haroutunian, Harry J. & Anita G. 



23,700 
52,500 
12,900 
51,400 

31,400 
27,800 
39,500 
16,600 
56,700 
41,300 
34,900 
40,200 
20,200 
33,600 
51,300 
35,600 
30 , 300 
45,900 
16,500 
40,800 
37,800 
40,600 

42,000 

45,400 
50,200 
14.900 
15,900 
16,100 
24,300 
36,000 
32,300 
27,600 
23,900 
16,900 
36,000 
17,000 
19,900 
4,100 
29,300 

21,100 
31,900 
24,100 
27,000 
13,600 



$ 



182 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Harrington, Clifford F. , Jr. & 

Winthrop W. , Jr. 
Harrington, Nancy 
Harrington, Winthrop W., Jr. 
Harris, Melvyn H. & Nancy M. 
Harris , Naomi A. 
Harris, Roger W. & Evelyn B. 
Hart, Estate of Joseph S. 
Hartwell Farm 
Harvey, Harriet R. 
Harwood, Reed 

Hatsopoulos, George N. & Daphne 
Hawes , Donald 0. & Lillian B. 
Haworth, George G. & Thelma E. 
Hay t ay an, Harry M. & Katherine J. 
H. B. Knowles , Inc. 
Healey, Harry R. , Jr. & Jeanne C. 
Healy, Edward M. & Helen T. 
Heart, Frank E. & Jane S. 
Heartt, Stephen & Charlotte B. 
Heck, Mary Higbee 
Hedge, Mary A. 
Helburn, Peter 

Helburn, Peter & Levin, Alvin 
Hellman, Maurice H. & Dolores T. 
Hemry , Leslie P. & Mary Jane 
Henderson, Gerard C. & Edith M. 
Henderson, Robert S. 
Henderson, Robert S. & Carolyn H. 
Henley, Merrill J. & Estate of Ida H. 
Hennessy, Frank J., Jr. & Pauline G. 
Herlin, Melvin A. & Eugenia T. 
Herman, William F. 
Herthel, Stephen W. & Evelyn S. 
Hester, Leon B. & Mary B. 
Hibben, George C. & Julia K. 
Hibben, Julia K. 
Hill, Jacques A. F. & Helen S. 
Hill, Walter L. & Patricia C. 
Hoar, George W. & Dorothy S. & Hoar, 

Norman W. & Shirley E. 
Holbrow, Frederick & Florence G. 
Holiday Homes, Inc. 
Holland, Taffy K. 

Hollingsworth , Lowell M. & Florence S. 
Hollister, Walter M. & J. Sally 
Home National Bank of Brockton, Tr . 
Hoover, Henry B. & Lucretia J. 



7,500 



9,410 



550 



300 



9,700 


358.90 


2,500 


92.50 


78,200 


2,893.40 


15,100 


558.70 


16,800 


621.60 


32,500 


1,202.50 


5,300 


196.10 




277.50 


15,800 


584.60 


64,700 


2,393.90 


54,200 


2,005.40 


27,300 


1,010.10 


29,900 


1 , 106 . 30 


20,400 


754.80 


58,300 


2,505.27 


23,800 


880.60 


27,600 


1,021.20 


32,200 


1,191.40 


35,900 


1,328.30 


.00,800 


3,729.60 


48,100 


1,779.70 




20.35 


85,800 


3,174.60 


29,200 


1,080.40 


9,900 


366.30 


28,600 


1,058.20 


1,300 


59.20 


33,100 


1,224.70 


18,400 


680.80 


23,500 


869.50 


37,000 


1,369.00 


60,100 


2,223.70 


59,000 


2,183.00 


39,300 


1,454.10 


23,500 


869.50 


2,900 


107.30 


49,500 


1,831.50 


32,700 


1,209.90 


30,700 


1,135.90 


17,400 


643.80 


58,600 


2,168.20 


27,600 


1,021.20 


45,900 


1,698.30 


28,000 


1,036.00 


24,600 


910.20 


35,400 


1,309.80 



183 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 57,800 


$ 2,138.60 




19,800 


732.60 




39,000 


1,443.00 




17,100 


632.70 




14,600 


540.20 




51,800 


1,916.60 




7,800 


288.60 




42,500 


1,572.50 




17,200 


636.40 




77,500 


2,867.50 




5,100 


188.70 




32,400 


1,198.80 




17,000 


629.00 




16,700 


617.90 




45,400 


1,679.80 




43,200 


1,598.40 




32,200 


1,191.40 




26,600 


984.20 




25,700 


950.90 




19,800 


732.60 


100 




3.70 




36,900 


1,365.30 




50,400 


1,864.80 




22,600 


836.20 




33,200 


1,228.40 




37,900 


1,402.30 




5,800 


214.60 




40,800 


1,509.60 




27,500 


1,017.50 




45,600 


1,687.20 




25,500 


943.50 




54,800 


2,027.60 




32,100 


1,187.70 




73,400 


2,715.80 




38,300 


1,417.10 




61,000 


2,257.00 




37,400 


1,383.80 




55,000 


2,035.00 




25,400 


939.80 




28,700 


1,061.90 




33,600 


1,243.20 




18,000 


666.00 




16,100 


595.70 




59,000 


2,183.00 



Hopkins, J. David, Jr. & Claire T. 

Horn, Michael C. & Helen C. 

Horwitz, Murray & Patricia F. 

Hosey , John E. & Margaret L. 

Houghton, Estate of John J. & Lillian 

Housman, Frank M. & Ruth B. 

Howard, Elizabeth F. 

Hubbard, Eliot, Jr. 

Humphreys, J. Robert & M. Lillian 

Hunsaker, Jerome C. , Jr. 

Hunt, Caroline L. 

Hunt, Merrill T. 

Huntley, George F. (Est. of) & 

Lottie D. 
Huntley, Medford E. & Blanche L. 
Hurd, Joseph & Nellie M. 
Hurd, Nancy Dabney 
Hurff, Joseph L. & Elizabeth C. 
Husek, Joseph John & Helen 
Hutchins , John C. & Eleanor B. 
Hutchinson, James A. , Jr. 
Hyde, Benjamin 
Hyde, Benjamin D. & Mildred B. 

Iben, Icko, Jr. & Miriam G. 
Ide, Kenton J. & Christel 
Iliescu, Nicolae & Esther 
Ingard, K. Uno & Doris C. 
Irwin, Constance Root & Ayer, 

Harriet Root 
Irwin, Mary M. 
Ives, David 0. & Cecilia van H. 

Jackson, Dorothy W. 

Jackson, Gardner, Jr. & Sallie 

Jackson, Huson & Polly F- 

Jacob , Fred & Eva 

Jacobs, S. Ralph & Frances L. 

Jagger, James M. & Miriam H. 

James, Hamilton R. & Waleska E. 

Janes, G. Sargent & Ann B. 

Jeffery, Lawrence R. & Harriet K. 

Jenney , Charles J. & Katrina C. 

Jenney , Phyllis M. 

Jennings, Charles E. & Ann V. 

Jensen, Holgar J. & Grace A. 

Jensen, Olin A. & Agnes E. 

Jerodel Realty Trust 



184 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 45,500 


$ 1,683.50 




33,800 


1,250.60 




28,100 


1,039.70 




11,900 


440 . 30 




42,300 


1,565.10 




58,400 


2,160.80 




19,600 


725.20 




49,900 


1,846.30 




9,100 


336.70 




40,500 


1,498.50 




19,200 


710.40 




25,200 


932.40 




45,300 


1,676.10 




15,800 


584.60 


150 




5.55 




27,800 


1,028.60 




23,400 


865.80 




70,600 


2,612.20 




25,400 


939.80 




33,500 


1,239.50 




32,200 


1,191.40 




17,600 


651.20 




18,600 


688.20 




3,800 


140.60 


1,870 




69.19 




28,800 


1,065.60 


200 




7.40 




23,800 


880.60 




36,100 


1,335.70 




21,900 


810.30 




19,500 


721.50 




30,400 


1,124.80 




30,500 


1,128.50 




45,900 


1,698.30 




24,700 


913.90 




29,500 


1,091.50 




29,700 


1,098.90 




67,300 


2,490.10 




39,800 


1,472.60 




20,800 


769.60 




22,000 


814.00 




35,000 


1,295.00 




46,600 


1,724.20 




30,600 


1,132.20 




24,400 


902.80 


150 




5.55 




30,800 


1,139.60 



Jetter, George C. & Mary E. 

Jevon, Robert W. & Virginia B. 

John, DeWitt & Morley M. 

Johnson, Albert D. 

Johnson, Ernest L. & Grace M. 

Johnson, John E. 

Johnson, Kenneth A. & Gladys 

John Swanson Realty Corporation 

Jones , Ira M. 

Jones, Richard M. 

Jozwicki, Alfons & Adeline C. 

Kaelber, Edward G. & Patricia C. 

Kahn, Martin H. & Susan B. 

Kane, Henry B. & Elizabeth C. 

Kano, Cyrus H. 

Kano , Cyrus H. & Dorothy 

Kaplan, Leonard J. & Pearl B. 

Kasperian, Karl D. & Carol 0. 

Kaye, Harold & Alice S. 

Keay, Donald P. & Mary Ann L. 

Keevil, Charles S. , Jr. & Hannah M, 

Keily, Delbar P. & Gertrude E. 

Kelley, M. Gertrude 

Kennedy, Albert E. 

Kennedy Brothers 

Kennedy, Fitzroy 

Kennedy, John T. 

Kennedy Land Corporation 

Kenney , John F. 

Kent, Harold E. & Muriel B. 

Kent, Richard E. , Trustee 

Kessel, Joseph B. & Lesley J. 

Ketchum, Phillips, Jr. & Anne C. 

Keuper, Charles S. & Elinore W. 

Keyes , Janet T. 

Kindleberger , Charles P. & Sarah M, 

King, R. Bruce, Jr. & Eleanor T. 

King, William Tappan & Elizabeth M, 

Kingsbury, Roy S. & Ann B. 

Kinsler, Louise M. 

Kirby, Gerard L. 

Kirkpatrick, David W. & Margaret M, 

Kistiakowsky , Irma E. 

Kjellander, Mary C. 

Kling, John W. & Louise H. 

Knowles , Harry B., Jr. 

Knowles , Wilma E. 



185 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Koehler, Edward F. & Margaret M. 

Kolligian, Gregory Scott & Zoe 

Kolodny , Myer Z. & M. Lillian 

Kolyshkin, Lena 

Korhonen, Edwin J. & Miriam 

Kornfeld, George R. 

Kornfeld, George R. & Hulen S. 

Kramer, Manuel & Ruth L. 

Kubik, Charles S. & Emily K. 

Kuhns , Roger J. & Roberta B. 

Kusleika, Steven & Louise C. 

Lahey, Heirs of James 
Lahnstein, Karl F. 
Landrey , William J. & Rita M. 
Lane, J. Frank & Kathleen F. 
Lang, David J. & E. Ruth 
Lang, Richard E. & Betty Lee 
Langton, William G. & Jane G. 
Lankhorst, Beverly P. 
Larrabee, Leonard C. & Peggy S. 
Larson, John B. & Mafalda M. 
Larson, Robert C. & Betty F. 
Laverty , Charles & Lillian L. 
Lavine, Jerome M. & Mary C. 
Lavrakas , Fofo 
Law, John H. & Nancy F. 
Lawrence, David B. & Priscilla M, 
Lawrence, Lincoln C. & Blanche P, 
Lawson, Harold E. 
Laws on, Harold E. & Wanda E. 
Leathern, Ernest F. & Evelyn K. 
Leathern, Evelyn K. 
Leaver, Robert 0. & Barbara S. 
Leavitt, Donald P. & Christine P, 
Lee, Paul H. & Frances Sue 
Lee, Shih Ying & May C. 
Leeland Realty Company 
Leger, Mary E., Trustee 
Leggat, Thomas E. & Barbara B. 
Lemander, William C. & Emily K. 
LeMann , John 

Lemire, Robert A. & Virginia Mae 
Lenington, Robert L. & Carolyn J 
Lennon , James V. & Elin 
Leslie, Maurice A. 
Leslie, Maurice A. & Annie 
Leslie, Paul M. & Elizabeth M. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 31,400 


$ 1,161.80 




110,300 


4,081.10 




35,400 


1,309.80 




18,300 


677.10 




22,500 


832.50 


100 




3.70 




22,000 


814.00 




35,100 


1,298.70 




33,100 


1,224.70 




16,200 


599.40 




23,600 


873.20 




5,300 


196.10 




12,700 


469.90 




32,900 


1,217.30 




56,300 


2,083.10 




29,400 


1,087.80 




42,900 


1,587.30 




59,100 


2,186.70 




26,200 


969.40 




25,700 


950.90 




23,800 


880.60 




29,500 


1,091.50 




46,200 


1,709.40 




29,700 


1,098.90 




12,400 


458.80 




18,900 


699.30 




24,800 


917.60 




18,800 


695.60 


1,350 




49.95 




30,900 


1,143.30 




102,500 


3,792.50 




1,600 


59.20 




33,600 


1,243.20 




23,500 


869.50 




2,800 


103.60 




43,600 


1,613.20 




3,800 


140.60 




20,600 


762.20 




36,400 


1,346.80 




41,700 


1,542.90 




14,800 


547.60 




16,200 


599.40 




26,200 


969.40 




23,400 


865.80 




200 


7.40 




18,400 


680.80 




15,700 


580.90 



186 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



1,020 



750 
150 



Levey, Harold A. $ 100 

Levin, Alvin 480 

Levin, Alvin & Betty 

Li, Yao T. & Nancy T. 

Liddick, Harold S. & Virginia D. 

Liepins , Atis A. & Diana 

Light, Galen D. , Jr. & Lois McClure 

Lightbody, John W. , Sr. & Muriel G. 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 

Lincoln Development Corporation 

Lincoln, John W. & Clarinda Y. 

Lincoln Old Town Hall Corporation 

Lincoln Plumbing & Heating Co. 

Lindsay, Franklin A. 

Lindsay, Franklin A. & Margot C. 

Lingos , John G. , Stamatia & George 

Linnell, Zenos M. & Kathleen G. 

Linnell, Zenos M. , Stanley , Francis E. , 

& Caswell, John 
Linstrom, Peter J. & Maybelle L. 
Linway Realty Trust 
Litte, Rudolph 

Little, John D. C. & Elizabeth A. 
Livengood , Eleanor C. H. 
Llanover Trust 

Lo, Steven Shih Ting & Yi-Chao M. 
Lockwood, Dunbar, Jr. & Irene P. 
Loesel, Robert A. & Marybell 
Loewenstein, Paul & Sophie 
Long, Dorothy S. 
Long, L. Bruce & Mary Louise 
Loud, John F. & Mary L. 
Loveys , Harriet E. , Adm. 
Lovins , Gerald 
Lummus , John W. & Ann A. 
Lustwerk, Ferdinand & Ingeborg J. 
Lutnicki, Victor A. & Harriet H. 
Lynch, Edward H. & Madeline M. 
Lyon, Ruth 
Lyons, John F. 4,700 

MacFarland, Charles C. & Phyllis M. 
Maclnnis , Daniel A., Jr. & Frances M. 
Maclnnis , Shirley A. 
Mackenzie, Roland C. & Ethel L. 
Mackie, Walter G. & Mary Ann 
Maclaurin, Elfriede 
Maclaurin, Ellen 



J 


? 3.70 




17.76 


8,800 


325.60 


49,600 


1,835.20 


24,300 


899.10 


37,600 


1,391.20 


27,400 


1,013.80 


33,100 


1,224.70 




37.74 


29,100 


1,076.70 


18,300 


677.10 


11,700 


432.90 




27.75 




5.55 


76,000 


2,812.00 


35,400 


1,309.80 


50,900 


1,883.30 


6,400 


236.80 


22,300 


825.10 


100 


3.70 


34,600 


1,280.20 


31,900 


1,180.30 


17,900 


662.30 


21,500 


795.50 


21,200 


784.40 


55,500 


2,053.50 


16,200 


599.40 


33,500 


1,239.50 


20,400 


754.80 


39,400 


1,457.80 


49,500 


1,831.50 


27,600 


1,021.20 


19,500 


721.50 


31,900 


1,180.30 


29,300 


1,084.10 


52,400 


1,938.80 


17,000 


629.00 


16,200 


599.40 




173.90 


20,200 


747.40 


24,700 


913.90 


3,800 


140.60 


46,500 


1,720.50 


13,000 


481.00 


46,800 


1,731.60 


34,800 


1,287.60 



187 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



300 



MacLean, H. Arnold & Corinne C. $ 

MacLeod, Edward & Hester M. 

MacLeod, Edward, Jr., & Mary M. 

Mahan, Russell P. & Anastasia 

Maher, Raymond J. 

Maher, Raymond J. & Adeline 

Maher, Raymond P. & Gertrude M. 

Mahoney , Gerald J. & Jeanne M. 

Maier, Emanuel & Sylvia 

Mallett, Herbert A. & Eva M. 

Malloy, John R. 

Malloy, Robert M. 

Malloy, Robert M. & Est. of Irene C. 

Malloy, Robert M. , Jr., & Carol E. 

Mannarino, Joseph & Florence A. 

Manning, Catherine L. 

Manzelli, John & Dorothy 

Mar, James W. & Edith 

Marchetti, John W. & Sarah G. 

Maroni , Jacques R. 

Marsh, Paul E. & Margaret B. 

Martin, Robert T. & Margaret M. 

Martin, Spencer F. , Jr., & Caroline F. 

Martini, William F. & Virginia J. 

Marvin's Foreign Auto 

Mascari, Leonard E. & Grace B. 

Maselli, Aldo G. & F. Claire 

Mason, Hay den & Jean C. 

Mason, Max 

Mason, Max, Jr., & Betty M. 

Mason, Richard K. & Ann E. 

Mason, William C. & Virginia 

Maxwell, Ralph E. & Phyllis B. 

May field, Glover B. & Gale S. 

Maynide, Inc. 

McCausland, Gordon C. & Elizabeth C. 

McClennen, Alan & Louise H. 

McConnon, George J. & Esther G. 

McCrum, Lloyd G. , Trustee 

McColl, Archibald 200 

McCune, William J. & Elizabeth 

McEnness, Harold F. 

McGrath, James F. & Mary F. 

McHugh, Mary F. 

Mclnich, Bill & Bonnie June 

Mclntyre, Adelbert & Constance 

McKennan, William & Alice W. 

McKhann, Margaret L. 



$ 



850 



100 



25,800 


$ 954.60 


17,200 


636.40 


10,000 


370.00 


53,100 


1,964.70 




11.10 


18,800 


695.60 


15,300 


566.10 


23,900 


884.30 


41,800 


1,546.60 


15,900 


588.30 


5,200 


192.40 


6,000 


222.00 


56,300 


2,083.10 


22,000 


814.00 


15,500 


573.50 


16,700 


617.90 


19,900 


736.30 


28,200 


1,043.40 


29,200 


1,080.40 


44,700 


1,653.90 


45,200 


1,672.40 


29,800 


1,102.60 


25,000 


925.00 


29,500 


1,091.50 




31.45 


4,100 


151.70 


31,000 


1,147.00 


21,300 


788.10 




3.70 


24,400 


902.80 


16,800 


621.60 


36,800 


1,361.60 


39,900 


1,476.30 


42,600 


1,576.20 


339,800 


12,572.60 


22,800 


843.60 


58,500 


2,164.50 


18,600 


688.20 


40,000 


1,480.00 




7.40 


49,200 


1,820.40 


5,700 


210.90 


39,300 


1,454.10 


9,000 


333.00 


34,000 


1,258.00 


28,500 


1,054.50 


38,600 


1,428.20 


49,500 


1,831.50 



188 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



& Janice H. 
& Eleanor H. 



McKnight, David B. & Eleanor J. $ 
McKnight, David B. & Ernest T., d/b/a 

McKnight' s Nursery & Landscape 

Service 
McKnight, Wilmot & Katherine E. 
McLean, John L. & Ann A. 
McLellan, John W. & Julia C. 
McLeod, James & Ethel B. 
McMurtry, George C. & Rose Mary 
McNamee, John F. , III, & Jacqueline B. 
McNulty, Thomas F. & Mary S. 
Mead, Varnum 
Mead, Varnum R. 
Meade, Edmund J 
Melanson, Leonard J. & Mary 
Meriam, Philip W. & Ellin F. 
Meriam, Richard S. & Alice G. 
Merrill, Henry M. , Jr., & Priscilla 
Merrill, Vincent N. & Anne S. 
Messina, Diego R. & Elena C. 
Messina, Jaspare & Grazia 
Meyer, James W. 
Meyer, James W. & Carol H. 
Meyer, Robert V. & Eugenie S. 
Mickle, Rita 

Milender, Sumner N. & Edith M. 
Militzer, Raymond E. & Martha B. 
Millar, Philip & Winifred M. 
Millard, Donald A. & Jeannette D. 
Miller, Joseph F. G. & Paula A. L. 
Mills, Cecil R. & Lillian M. 
Mintz, Norbett L. & Sophie B. 
Mitrano, Salvatore 
Mix, Thomas R. & Helen 
Mixon, Scott I. & Isabel 
Monks , Ann S . 

Moody, Charles P. & Josephine C. 
Moor, Edgar J. & Joan R. 
Moore, John E., Trustee 
Moore, Laurence & Eleanor 
Moore, Murvale H. , Jr. & NeGarre H. 
Moore, Paul 

Moore, Robert L. & Dorothy H. 
Morette, Walter J. & Gertrude C. 
Morey , Kenneth & Ruth I. 
Morgan, Henry M. & Gwen G. 
Morgan, Richard S. & Molly H. 
Morris, Milliage E. & Beatrice M. 



100 



300 



150 



19,700 $ 



728.90 



4,700 




173.90 


18,400 




680.80 


18,500 




684.50 


14,300 




529.10 


9,300 




344.10 


25,000 




925.00 


18,100 




669.70 


65,100 


2 


,408.70 
3.70 


23,100 




854.70 


13,800 




510.60 


15,800 




584.60 


25,900 




958.30 


50,400 


1 


,864.80 


28,200 


1 


,043.40 


24,900 




921.30 


6,000 




222.00 


22,900 




847.30 
11.10 


30,600 


1 


,132.20 


33,200 


1 


,228.40 
5.55 


47,900 


1 


,772.30 


63,100 


2 


,334.70 


13,600 




503.20 


59,200 


2 


,190.40 


32,700 


1 


,209.90 


18,200 




673.40 


3,800 




140.60 


9,300 




344.10 


25,200 




932.40 


29,900 


1 


,106.30 


190,400 


7 


,044.80 


27,800 


1 


,028.60 


47,600 


1 


,761.20 


30,200 


1 


,117.40 


47,500 


1 


,757.50 


29,300 


1 


,084.10 


100 




3.70 


26,500 




980.50 


23,000 




851.00 


16,800 




621.60 


43,000 


1 


,591.00 


30,700 


1 


,135.90 


10,600 




392.20 



189 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Morris, Robert E. F. (Estate of) & 

Clara D. 
Morris, Robert H. & Irene S. 
Morrissey, J. Neil 
Morrissey, J. Neil & Mary F. 
Morse, Thomas R. 

Morse, William H. & Marguerite D. 
Morse, William H. & Patricia A. 
Moss, Leonard G. & Frances S. 
Moss, Richard W. & Barbara B. 
Mount, Wayne D. & Claire L. 
Mukhitarian, Samuel & Stephanie 
Murphy, Cyrus W. & Persis S. 
Murphy, Daniel J. & Louise C. 
Murphy, Edward W. 
Murphy, Mary B. 
Murphy, Mina Dorothea 
Murphy, William F. & Ruth M. 
Myles, Theresa Anne & J. Richard 

Naiman, Mark L. & Adeline L. 

Napoli , Joseph J. 

Natoli, Donald J. & Lois M. 

Nathan, Nigel H. & Luella A. 

Navon, David H. & Roberta 

Neely, Scott & Joan H. 

Neiley, Alexander H. & Diana B. 

Nelson, Albert E. 

Nelson, Duncan M. 

Nelson, Erik J. & 

Nelson, Jean 

Nelson, W. Newton 

Nesto, Bruno R. & 

Neumann, Ernest P. 

Sylvia B. 
Newbold, Thomas 
Newell, Lena M. 
New England Tel. & 
Newman, Philip & Els a L. 
Newman, Robert B. & Mary Shaw 
Newton, George C. , Jr. 
Newton, Harland B. & Ethel A. 
Newton, Hazel H. 
Nichols, Walter & Ethel D. 
Niles, John B. & Muriel L. 
Niles, Robert L. & Virginia M 
Norton, Paul L. 
Norton, Paul L. & Margaret 



& Marjorie E. 
& Jean R. 
Dorothy G. 



Eugenia R. 
(Estate of) 



Tel. Co. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 


$ 




16,000 


592.00 




17,700 


654.90 


100 




3.70 




17,800 


658.60 




38,100 


1,409.70 




19,400 


717.80 




24,400 


902.80 




25,800 


954.60 




28,000 


1,036.00 




29,000 


1,073.00 




18,400 


680.80 




20,700 


765.90 




16,400 


606.80 




26,900 


995.30 




21,200 


784.40 




16,800 


621.60 




43,800 


1,620.60 




35,600 


1,317.20 




21,600 


799.20 




40,000 


1,480.00 




25,100 


928.70 




26,900 


995.30 




41,800 


1,546.60 




26,700 


987.90 




30 , 100 


1,113.70 




27,500 


1,017.50 




38,400 


1,420.80 




19,300 


714.10 


100 




3.70 




38,300 


1,417.10 




32,900 


1,217.30 




44,200 


1,635.40 




43,900 


1,624.30 




20,800 


769.60 


272,300 




10,075.10 




43,200 


1,598.40 




58,600 


2,168.20 


300 


33,800 


1,261.70 




29,300 


1,084.10 




19,500 


721.50 




19,800 


732.60 




18,800 


695.60 




27,600 


1,021.20 




7,800 


288.60 




33,100 


1,224.70 



190 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Novak, Kalman & Nellie R. 
Nystrom, Foster H. & Edna C. 

O'Brien, Daniel F. 

O'Brien, Daniel F. & Mary T. 

O'Brien, John H. 

O'Brien, John H. & Barbara M. 

O'Brien, Joseph A. & Virginia B. 

Ogden, David D. & Joan A. 

Old County Realty Trust 

O'Leary, Paul J. & Alyce M. 

Olivieri, James & Dorothy M. 

Olivo, Jean E. 

Olmsted, Harriet A. 

01s en, Kenneth H. & Elva-Liisa A 

Olsen, Ralph & Marcia E. 

O'Neill, Edward J. & Teresa 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. & Camilla M. 

Osborne, Gordon 

Osborne, Gordon & Freda W. 

Out ten, Henry P. & Nancy K. 

Owen, Carleton W. 

Owen, Charles J. & Mary Lee 

Owirka, Frederick R. & Mary A. 

Paddock, Louis E. & Ann E. 

Page, Elizabeth J. 

Page, Elliott F. & Emily R. 

Page, Lot B. & Patricia H. 

Page, Milton S. 

Page, Milton S. & Roberta M. 

Page, Stanley W. & Elisabeth H. 

Paige, Richard B. & Elizabeth 

Paine, Albert S. & Noelle W. 

Paino, Dolores M. 

Palmer, Attelio A. & Kathryne 

Palmer, Eleanor M. 

Panetta, Frank & James 

Panetta, Frank & Theresa J. 

Panetta, James J. & Rosemary D. 

Panetta, Pasquale & Mary 

Panetta, Salvatore & Rita 

Paone, Mary T. 

Paquette, Margaret 

Parish, Edward C. , 

Parker, Jackson B. 

Parsons, W. Chester & Claire T. 

Pastoriza, James J. & Ruth B. 

Pattinson, Mary I. 



200 



40 



3.600 



200 



Jr . , & Joan DeF. 
& Jacaueline S. 



$ 32,900 $ 1,217.30 
21,000 777.00 





7.40 


19,400 


717.80 


28,300 


1,048.58 


32,500 


1,202.50 


25,600 


947.20 


50,900 


1,883.30 


11,900 


440.30 


34,500 


1,276.50 


17,200 


636.40 


1,800 


66.60 


80,200 


2,967.40 


53,400 


1,975.80 


20,300 


751.10 


35,800 


1,324.60 


17,400 


643.80 




133.20 


96,900 


3,585.30 


26,700 


987.90 


6,400 


236.80 


21,900 


810.30 


19,700 


728.90 


25,600 


947.20 


29,500 


1,091.50 


24,300 


899 . 10 


41,300 


1,528.10 




7.40 


23,200 


858.40 


18,400 


680.80 


24,500 


906.50 


300 


11.10 


33,300 


1,232.10 


18,900 


699.30 


28,300 


1,047.10 


3,100 


114.70 


29,500 


1,091.50 


18,900 


699.30 


25,800 


954.60 


15,700 


580.90 


4,100 


151.70 


2,700 


99.90 


29,200 


1,080.40 


26,400 


976.80 


37,300 


1,380.10 


29,500 


1,091.50 


23,900 


884.30 



191 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Pavlo, Jessie 

Payne, Roger S. & Katherine B. 
Payne, William T. & Mary H. 
Pearmain, W. Robert & Claire P. 
Peavy, Leopold, Jr., & Elizabeth J. 
Peck, Will V. & Mildred E. 
Peirce, Isabel T. 
Peloquin, Roy J. & Alice M. 

Alexander C. & Elizabeth B. 

Constantin 

Constantin A. & Olga 

Olga 



Mary E. 
Phyllis L. 



& Charlotte T. 



Pertzoff , 

Pertzoff , 

Pertzoff, 

Pertzoff, 

Peterson, Frank W. 

Peterson, Frank W. & 

Petritis, Peter N. & 

Petti t, Kathreen N. 

Phillips , Henry B 

Phinney, Jean R. 

Pianka, Walter E. & Ann C. 

Pickman, Anthony P. 

Pickman, Anthony & Alice L. 

Pierce, Charles Eliot & Dora R. 

Pike, John A. & Mary S. 

Pino, Frank J. & Muriel E. 

Plant, Paul R. & Madeline Leonard 

Podsen, Robert E. & Doris A. 

Polumbaum, Theodore S. & Nyna 

Porter, Stanley D. & Josephine 

Postel, Sholem & Marie L. 

Poulos , Charles L. & Sophie 

Powers, Francis L. , Jr., & Helen E. 

Pratt, Nancy A. 

Preston, Jean W. 

Preston, William M. 

Primak, John & Lena 

Purcell, William D. & Helen G. 

Quarton, Gardner & Frances 

Radasch, Donald & Margaret R. 

Rag an, Ralph R. 

Rag an, Ralph R. & Ruth M. 

Raja, Roy M. & Ellen A. 

Raker, Morris & Anne M. 

Rand, Lucy Kimball 

Rand, William M. & Priscilla W. 

Rando, Thomas 

Rapperport, Eugene J. & Lucy H. 

Rappoli, Arthur E. & Dorothy H. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 5,200 


$ 192.40 




26,000 


962.00 




42,800 


1,583.60 




28,500 


1,054.50 




71,600 


2,649.20 




21,100 


780.70 




22,300 


825.10 




18,900 


699.30 




53,700 


1,986.90 


320 




11.84 




141,800 


5,246.60 




77,700 


2,874.90 


150 




5.55 




33,300 


1,232.10 




47,800 


1,768.60 




25,100 


928.70 




64,400 


2,382.80 




57,900 


2,142.30 




10,500 


388.50 


300 




11.10 




80,100 


2,963.70 




46,600 


1,724.20 




27,200 


1,006.40 




20,300 


751.10 




31,700 


1,172.90 




52,800 


1,953.60 




33,900 


1,254.30 




32,800 


1,213.60 




21,400 


791.80 




30,800 


1,139.60 




15,400 


569.80 




2,500 


92.50 




75,000 


2,775.00 


150 




5.55 




4,000 


148.00 




17,600 


651.20 




64,300 


2,379.10 




23,500 


869.50 




2,900 


107.30 




25,900 


958.30 




18,200 


673.40 




43,800 


1,620.60 




61,500 


2,275.50 




31,700 


1,172.90 




26,000 


962.00 




28,500 


1,054.50 




29,700 


1,098.90 



192 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Raws on, Edward B. & Nancy B. 
Reece, Richard C. & Susan W. 
Reed, John D. 

Rego, Manuel J. & Catherine 
Reservoir Nursing Home, Inc. 
Rhodes, Timothy & Janet 
Ricci, Louis, Fred & Charles 
Rice, Arthur W., Jr., & Pauline K. 
Rice, James F. , Jr. , & Barbara A. 
Rich, Howard L. , Jr., & Ruth R. 
Richardson, Frederick C. 
Richardson, John A. W. & Anna H. 
Richardson, Lyle 
Riley, Allston & Marion H. 
Risch, Martin D. & Joan C. 
Robbins , Roland W. & Geraldine 
Robey, A. Alexander & Harriet S. 
Robichaud, George U. & Emma 
Robinson, Dora A. 
Rodimon, Mildred M. 
Rodrick, William D. & Alice E. 
Roehr , George L. & Marcia A. 



Rogers 
Rogers 
Rogers 



Alfred P 
Alfred P 
David C. 



& George E 
D. 



Trs 



Rogers , David F. 

Rogers, David F. & Harriet J. 

Rogers, Mabelle, Winifred & Evelyn 

Rolfe, Edward & Stephanie 

Rollins , Barbara 

Rollins, J. Leslie & Barbara 

Rollins, Oliver W. & Hala P. 

Rood, Allan & Jane 

Rooney, Edward D. & Elizabeth M. 

Rosane, Richard C. & Marjorie B. 

Rose, James & Glenys W. 

Rosenwald, Harold & Betty Booth 

Ross, Paul F. & Rita M. 

Ross, Thorvald S., Jr., & Margaret P. 

Ross, William C. & Marian L. 

Rossoni, John P. & Paola M. 

Rouner, Thomas J. & Doris J. 

Row, Ronald V. & Jane E. 

Rowe, Lawrence L. & Mildred M. 

Rowe, Standish S. 

Roy , Nancy C . 

Rubissow, George J. & Marion J. 

Rudnick, Mitchell K. & Rosalie A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 33,600 


$ 1,243.20 




38,400 


1,420.80 


100 




3.70 




22,100 


817.70 




100 


3.70 




23,500 


869.50 




10,700 


395.90 




58,200 


2,153.40 




19,900 


736.30 




54,300 


2,009.10 




25,700 


950.90 




33,200 


1,228.40 




37,900 


1,402.30 




42,900 


1,587.30 




19,100 


706.70 




16,800 


621.60 




58,200 


2,153.40 




22,600 


836.20 




16,000 


592.00 




16,700 


617.90 




22,100 


817.70 




78,100 


2,889.70 




39,500 


1,461.50 




16,800 


621.60 




28,600 


1,058.20 




600 


22.20 




26,900 


995.30 




38,600 


1,428.20 




31,800 


1,176.60 




500 


18.50 




31,800 


1,176.60 




22,900 


847.30 




20,600 


762.20 




17,500 


647.50 




33,700 


1,246.90 




26,300 


973.10 




55,500 


2,053.50 




49,700 


1,838.90 




36,400 


1,346.80 




32,200 


1,191.40 




45,300 


1,676.10 




7,000 


259.00 




35,300 


1,306.10 




5,600 


207.20 




40,800 


1,509.60 




16,500 


610.50 




28,100 


1,039.70 




41,200 


1,524.40 



193 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Rugo, Henry J. & Faith W. 

Ruocco, Ralph J. A. & Isabel I. 

Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln 

Russell, James D. & Marguerite M. 

Russell, Marie Hamilton 

Russes , Richard P. & Mary D. 

Ryan, Alice E., Conservator 

Ryan, Frank A. 

Ryan, James J. & Helen 

Ryan, Lawrence 

Ryan, Mary A. 

Ryan, William H. & Mary B. 

Ryer, Russell E. & Margaret C. 

Sabbag, Arthur & Evelyn J. 
Salmon, Walter J. & Marjorie B. 
Sampson, Coleman W. & Phyllis E. 
Sanderson, George A. (Estate of) & 

Priscilla R. 
Sandy Pond Trust 
Sartori, Louis R. & Ruth M. 
Satterfield, Charles N. & Anne P. 
Saul, Robert E. & Madeline Louise 
Saunders, Philip, Jr., & Virginia L 
Sawtell, Clement C. & Adelaide I. 
Sayre, Woodrow W. 
Schaal, Albert A. & Zelpha M. 
Scheuer, Harry & Catherine N. 
Scholz, Mary A. 
Schumacher, August & Mary L. 
Schumacher, August T. & Ellen Marie 
Schwann, William & Aire-Maija 
Scott, Anne 
Scott, Hermon H. 
Seaver, John D. 
Seaver, John D. & Millicent 
Sedgwick, Harold Bend 
Seeckts, Ehlert W. 
Seeckts, Ehlert W. & Eleanor R. 
Selfridge, Oliver G. & Allison G. 
Senders, John W. & Virginia L. 
Sexton, Maurice J. 
Shambaugh, Joan D. 
Shansky, David & Nettie 
Shapiro, David & Esther 
Shapiro, Susan Rootberg 
Sharpe , William 
Sharpe, William, Jr., & Elaine D. 



150 



200 



48,000 
26,200 
15,100 
23,800 
41,300 
10,400 
24,600 
1,100 
21,300 
13,300 
13,000 
77,100 
28,000 

18,100 
33,400 
22,300 

54,300 
110,900 
38,400 
35,600 
23,500 
31,000 
33,500 

4,900 

400 

32,900 

44,400 

11,700 

1,100 
40,700 
37,300 
24,500 

41,100 
35,900 
28,000 
33,800 
30,800 
34,000 
18,800 
26,200 
30,400 
28,500 
32,700 

45,300 



1,776.00 
969.40 
558.70 
880.60 

1,528.10 
384.80 
910.20 
40.70 
788.10 
492.10 
481.00 

2,852.70 

1,036.00 

669.70 

1,235.80 

825.10 

2,009.10 
4,103.30 
1,420.80 
1,317.20 

869.50 
1,147.00 
1,239.50 

181.30 

14.80 

1,217.30 

1,642.80 

432.90 

40.70 

1,505.90 

1,380.10 

906.50 
5.55 
1,520.70 
1,328.30 
1,036.00 
1,250.60 
1,139.60 
1,258.00 

695.60 

969.40 
1,124.80 
1,054.50 
1,209.90 
7.40 
1,676.10 



194 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Shaw, Alice DeS . 

Shea, William J. & Margaret T. 

Shepard, G. Dudley 

Shepard, Gardner D. & Mary Macy 

Sherman, Daniel E. , Jr., & Sadie J. 

Sherman, Matthew N. & Diane F. 

Sherwin, Estate of Edward V. 

Shomphe, Patrick W. (Estate of) & 

Annie B. 
Shurling , Watson & Emily I. 
Siler, William C. & Barbara Jean 
Silva, Mary E. 

Silva, Walter J. & Lucille J. 
Simms , Hugh P. & Margaret J. 
Simonds , Anthony J. 
Simonds, Lena J. 
Simourian, John & Lillian M. 
Sisson, John H. & Barbara B. 
Slayter, Henry S., 2nd, & Elizabeth 
Smith, Alan B. & Marjorie B. 
Smith, Carl D. & Florence C. 
Smith, Harold Dean & Elizabeth H. 
Smith, John E. , Trustee 
Smith, Margaret L. 
Smith, Sumner 

Smith, William J. & Barbara J, 
Smulowicz, Bronislaw & Sawera 
Smyth, Robert R. & Adella C. 
Snelling, Charles A. 
Snelling, Dorothy R. 
Snelling, Howard & Elizabeth J. 
Snelling, Jessica 
Snelling, John R. & Jacquelyn H. 
Snelling, Norman J. & Carolyn R. 
Snider, Greta W. 
Sorenson, Heirs of Hans 
Southack, Theodore L. , Jr. , & Marion 
Southard, Garrison A., Jr., & Floryse 
Spaeth, Daniel A. & Margaret A. 
Spangle, Clarence W. & Virginia G. 
Spence , Robert A. & Helen M. 
Spencer, Henry W. & Marguerite G. 
Spindler, Cecil J., Trustee 
Spock, Michael & Judith W. 
Spooner, Frederick C. & Sarah W. 
Spooner, Lily T. 

Springborn, Robert C. & Carolyn J. 
Stankard, Charles E., Jr. & Jean C. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 83,800 


$ 3,100.60 




21,100 


780.70 


200 




7.40 




41,100 


1,520.70 




25,800 


954.60 




36,500 


1,350.50 




5,500 


203.50 




35,700 


1,320.90 




9,400 


347.80 




23,500 


869.50 




78,600 


2,908.20 




23,100 


854.70 




18,300 


677.10 




18,800 


695.60 




1,900 


70.30 




42,600 


1,576.20 




48,400 


1,790.80 




24,200 


895.40 




40,100 


1,483.70 




22,400 


828.80 




26,800 


991.60 




16,900 


625.30 




68,400 


2,530.80 




117,400 


4,343.80 




11,400 


421.80 




32,200 


1,191.40 




30,000 


1,110.00 




17,500 


647.50 




15,500 


573.50 




20,500 


758.50 




39,900 


1,476.30 




33,400 


1,235.80 




16,700 


617.90 




7,100 


262.70 




8,400 


310.80 




49,500 


1,831.50 




47,000 


1,739.00 




29,900 


1,106.30 




44,000 


1,628.00 




26,800 


991.60 




52,300 


1,935.10 




49,500 


1,831.50 




26,400 


976.80 




15,300 


566.10 




19,200 


710.40 




52,000 


1,924.00 




15,200 


562.40 



195 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



St. Anne's Church, Parish of $ 

Stebbins, Herbert A., Jr. & Patricia 

Stevens, Charles H. & Patricia 

Stevens, Frank R. & Katherine L. 

Stevens, Kimball C. & Eleanor G. 

Stevens, Samuel A. C. & Ellen A. 

Stevenson, John P. & Patricia A. 

Stewart, Francis J., Jr., & Ruth L. 

Stires, Ernest M. & Iva 0. 

Stockellburg , Doris Mae 

Stoudt, Howard W. & Jean H. 

St. Pierre, Gertrude 

Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 

Street, Earle B. & Janet H. 

Striker, William W. & Marjorie B. 

Stubbins, Diana 

Sturgis, Alanson H. , Jr., & Anne H. 

Sturm, Paul J. & Patricia C. 

Sullivan, Gladys G. 

Summers, Richard B. & Winifred F. 

Sutherland, Robert L. & Ann F. 

Swan, Edmund & Eleanor G. 

Swanson, Alfred & Evelyn Aiken 

Swanson, Arthur H. & Helen K. 

Swanson Pontiac, Inc. 

Swartz, Eli & Jeanette U. 

Sweeney, Joseph E. & Jeanne M. 

Swiedler Building Corporation 

Swift, William N. 

Swift, William N. & Phyllis C. 

Swinconeck, John J. & Sophie 

Sykes , David F. & Margaret P. 

Sylvan Investment Trust 

Sylvia, Lawrence M. & Barbara L. 



C. 
Trustee 
Jr. , & Dorothy C. 



Taillacq, Elsie A 

Tarbell, George G 

Tarbell, George G 

Tarky, Vincent T. 

Tarky, William J. 

Taschioglou, Kemon P. & Rhoda K. 

Taylor, Edward S. 

Taylor, Frederick 

Taylor, W. Royce & 

Teabo, Prince C. & 

Tead, Eleanor K. 

Telling, Irving & Jane Cushman 



Jr. 



I. & Lex H. 

Dorothy V. 
Elizabeth T. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 20,000 


$ 740.00 




21,600 


799.20 




42,000 


1,554.00 




43,200 


1,598.40 




32,500 


1,202.50 




28,800 


1,065.60 




36,900 


1,365.30 




29,600 


1,095.20 




16,200 


599.40 




5,400 


199.80 




16,500 


610.50 




17,100 


632.70 




17,000 


629.00 




41,800 


1,546.60 




20,100 


743.70 




25,200 


932.40 




20,200 


747.40 




55,500 


2,053.50 




17,000 


629.00 




20,500 


758.50 




26,900 


995.30 




21,100 


780.70 




25,100 


928.70 




25,000 


925.00 


1,500 




55.50 




17,500 


647.50 




21,700 


802.90 




22,000 


814.00 


150 




5.55 




28,800 


1,065.60 




10,800 


399.60 




29,600 


1,095.20 




200 


7.40 




27,300 


1,010.10 




18,200 


673.40 




72,200 


2,671.40 




26,700 


987.90 




80,400 


2,974.80 




6,000 


222.00 




25,100 


928.70 




47,700 


1,764.90 




33,800 


1,250.60 




23,400 


865.80 




15,400 


569.80 




28,000 


1,036.00 




31,300 


1,158.10 



196 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



& Anne G . 
& Claire F. 



& Laura 
Jr . , & Jane C . 
Muriel M. 



, & Arlene 
Dorothy A. 
Lois K. 
& Ruth V. 



Tenneco, Inc. 

Tetreault, Arthur H. 

Tetreault, Arthur H. 

Tew, John B. 

Thiessen, Arthur 

Thiessen, Arthur E. 

Thomas , George W. , 

Thomas , Peter A. & 

Thompson, Donald J. 

Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr 

Thompson, Lawrence 

Thompson, Lawrence E. & 

Thorpe, Margaret M. 

Thuss, Ralph J., Jr., & 

Tinder, Glenn & Gloria 

Tingey , William H. , Jr. , 

Tingley, Frederick M. & Dilla G. 

Titus, William A. & D. Marion 

Todd, C. Lee, Jr., Eveleth R. , 

David & John 
Todd, Mabel H. (Estate of) 
Todd Pond Corporation 
Toler, Louise C. 
Tonseth, Didrick L. & Phebe L. 
Torode, Herbert 

Torode , Herbert L. & Lorraine S. 
Toulmin, Stephen E. & June 
Tracey, Elizabeth M. 
Tracey, Robert J. & Caroline J. 
Tracey 's Service Station 
Travers , Paul & Bernice 
Troisi, Ferdinand L. & Mary G. 
Tunnell, Raymond W. & Suzanne D. 
Turner, Charles F. & Winifred A. 
Turner, James R. & Mildred B. 
Turner, Vernon D. & Merry lees K. 
Tyler, Ethel A. 
Tyler, Heirs of Watson 

Umbrello, Carmel V. 
Umbrello, Francis & Virginia 
U. S. Dynamics Realty Trust 

Valley Pond Realty Trust 

Van Dorn, Walter G. & Joan S. 

Van Leer, Hans L. 

Van Leer, Hans L. & Mary K. 

Van Leer, R. Karl & Rachel D. 



$ 153,150 



150 



200 



160 



3,230 



1,000 $ 5,703.55 



16,300 


603.10 


21,400 


791.80 


66,200 


2,449.40 




5.55 


50,900 


1,883.30 


17,400 


643.80 


22,300 


825.10 


44,800 


1,657.60 


28,300 


1,047.10 




7.40 


42,900 


1,587.30 


38,900 


1,439.30 


17,600 


651.20 


38,900 


1,439.30 


34,200 


1,265.40 


23,300 


862.10 


13,700 


506.90 


16,600 


614.20 


61,300 


2,268.10 


318,600 


11,788.20 


20,600 


762.20 


21,800 


806.60 




5.92 


17,500 


647.50 


38,100 


1,409.70 


58,600 


2,168.20 


18,500 


684.50 




119.51 


37,900 


1,402.30 


13,700 


506.90 


36,300 


1,343.10 


15,400 


569.80 


25,900 


958.30 


28,400 


1,050.80 


11,400 


421.80 


11,100 


410.70 


20,200 


747.40 


24,500 


906.50 


3,100 


114.70 


6,500 


240.50 


16,500 


610.50 


1,700 


62.90 


59,500 


2,201.50 


38,500 


1,424.50 



197 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Van Wart, Walter L. & Stephenia 
Venier, Ettore P. & Mary E. 
Vercollone, Edmund S. & Julia 
Vitale, Joseph A. & M. Frances 

Wadsworth , Charles Y. & Virginia D. 

Waible, Wendell J. & Florence E. 

Walen, Roger S. & Constance M. 

Wales, Andrew M. & Betty R. 

Wales , Isabel G. 

Wales, R. Langdon & Ruth W. 

Walker, Sidney A. 

Walter, Charlton M. & Rosly M. 

Walton, Frank E. & Julie 

Wang, An & Lorraine C. 

Ward, Thomas D. & Jane L. 

Ward, Walter B. & Sophie E. 

Ward, Walter B. , Jr., & Marie L. 

Warner, Henrietta S. 

Warner, John Burton & Barbara Kaighn 

Warren, Donald H. & Joan B. 

Watts Realty Corporation 

Waugh , John S. & Nancy C. 

Weatherbee, Robert E. 

Webb, Rosella 

Webster, David & Winifred W. 

Weeks tein, Richard & Muriel 

Weiss, Alfred D. & Anne K. 

Welch, Vernon F. & Leatrice June 

Wells , George & Katherine W. 

Westcott, Vernon C. & Mary Alice 

West Newton Savings Bank 

Western Union Telegraph Co. 

Whalen, William B. & Mary E. 

Whatley, Robert Boyd & Kay A. 

Wheeler, Jennie Noyes 

White, John R. & Gina R. 

White, Katharine S. & John W. 

White, Robert E. & Marion J. 

Whitman, Nelson & Helen D. 

Whitman, Ross & Virginia R. 

Wilbor, John S. & Dorothy B. 

Wiley, G. Arnold & Helen P. 

Wilfert, Fred J. & Eleanor M. 

Wilfert, Walter A. & Eleanor A. 

Wilfert, Walter A., Eleanor A., 

Fred J. & Eleanor M. 
Willemin, Julian V. & Jane A. 



$ 20,100 $ 743.70 

53,100 1,964.70 

23,300 862.10 

29,000 1,073.00 



2,100 



73,200 
27,900 
26,900 
33,200 
51,500 
36,900 
41,700 
48,300 
15,600 
50,900 
20,300 
18,700 
16,600 
47,100 
35,100 
37,600 

3,900 
41,800 

2,800 
28,300 
24,300 
40,900 
48,100 
17,500 
41,800 
22,900 



16,200 
20,400 
5,400 
45,200 
56,300 
25,700 
55,600 
10,000 
31,500 
14,000 
20,500 
20,300 

400 
22,100 



2,708.40 

1,032.30 

995.30 

1,228.40 

1,905.50 

1,365.30 

1,542.90 

1,787.10 

577.20 

1,883.30 

751.10 

691.90 

614.20 

1,742.70 

1,298.70 

1,391.20 

144.30 

1,546.60 

103.60 

1,047.10 

899.10 

1,513.30 

1,779.70 

647.50 

1,546.60 

847.30 

1,024.90 

77.70 

599.40 

754.80 

199.80 

1,672.40 

2,083.10 

950.90 

2,057.20 

370.00 

1,165.50 

518.00 

758.50 

751.10 

14.80 
817.70 



198 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 350 


$ 16,100 


$ 608.65 




32,500 


1,202.50 




20,000 


740.00 




15,500 


573.50 




22,700 


839.90 



Williams , Carolyn W. 
Williams, Edwin L. , Jr., & Ruth D. 
Williams, William G. & Jane C. 
Williamson, Elizabeth R. 
Willmann, Werner S. & Margaret M. 
Wilson, Elizabeth & Flaherty, 

Anthony J. 
Wilson, Montgomery S. (Estate of) & 

Mary Ann 
Wilson, Robert D. & Kathryn M. 
Winchell, Gordon 
Winchell, Gordon D. & Enid M. 
Winchell, Gordon D. , Guilbert S., 

Richard P. & Love, Dorothy W. 
Winchell, Guilbert & Estate of Evelyn 
Winchell, Guilbert S. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. & Amy Jane 
Winship, Lee C. 
Winship , Lee C. & Joyce L. 
Winship , Thomas 

Winship, Thomas & Elizabeth C. 
Wirsig, Stanley 
Wirsig, Stanley S. & Arlene B. 
Witherby, Thomas H. & Marianne J. A. 
Witherton, John R. & Emily A. 
Withey , Edward L. & Barbara H. 
Wollmar, Dick J. & Mary Lou 
Wood, Frank H. & Jeanne R. 
Wood, George A., Jr. & Nancy S. 
Wood, James D. & Ruth E. 
Wood, 0. Chester (Estate of) & Hilve V, 
Wood, Ralph V., Jr., & Virginia S. 
Wood, Robert C. & Margaret B. 
Wood, Robert M. & June W. 
Woodington, W. Gordon & Mary L. 
Worsham, Jack L. & Charlotte A. 
Worthington, Thomas K. & Elizabeth C. 
Wright , Malor & Ruth Vaughn 
Wright, Vernon G. & Huberta 



2,170 



150 
160 
300 
150 



Yagjian, Jacob 
Yeuell, Kay M. 
Yore, George P. 
Yos , Jerrold M. 
Young, David B. 
Young, Edward L 
Young, Lee A. & 
Young, Niels 0. 



& Inez 

& Suzanne R. 

& Kathleen 

& Ann B. 

& Cora S. 

Jane C. 
& Lucy J. 



24.400 



902.80 



28,400 


1,050.80 


27,400 


1,013.80 




80.29 


32,500 


1,202.50 


38,900 


1,439.30 


63,800 


2,360.60 




5.55 


18,600 


688.20 




5.92 


29,600 


1,095.20 




11.10 


57,100 


2,112.70 




5.55 


24,100 


891.70 


50,900 


1,883.30 


22,100 


817.70 


26,300 


973.10 


18,300 


677.10 


25,700 


950.90 


25,900 


958.30 


19,800 


732.60 


19,000 


703.00 


5,400 


199.80 


33,300 


1,232.10 


34,000 


1,258.00 


28,300 


1,047.10 


40,300 


1,491.10 


25,400 


939.80 


27,400 


1,013.80 


54,400 


2,012.80 


2,400 


88.80 


38,300 


1,417.10 


15,000 


555.00 


25,900 


958.30 


18,100 


669.70 


16,100 


595.70 


44,400 


1,642.80 


55,000 


2,035.00 



199 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1967 



Zarella, Joseph S. & Lillian M. 
Ziegler, Elmer H. & Hilda M. 
Zimmerman, Herbert E. & Pearl S. 
Zinck, Floyd A. & Elma W. 
Zuelke , Laurence W. & Nancy J. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 2,700 


$ 99.90 




20,600 


762.20 




200 


7.40 




26,400 


976.80 




18,100 


669.70 



200 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Clement C. Sawtell 

William T. King 

Richard F. Schroeder 



DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1967 $ 8.14 

Interest income received in 1967, net 1,016.78 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 9 . 13 

$1,034.05 

Safe deposit box rent $ 2.00 

Net income to Town of Lincoln 1,014.78 1,016.78 

Cash balance at December 31, 1967 $ 17.27 



First National Bank of Boston 

Cambridge Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

1000 Western Maryland RR 4% 10/1/69 

3000 Alabama Power Co. 3 1/2% 1/1/72 

1000 Southern Rwy. Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 10/15/72 

2000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

1000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 2 3/4% 10/1/75 

3000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1/15/79 

2000 U. S. Treasury 3 1/2% 11/15/80 

3000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 10/1/83 

1000 Idaho Power Co. 4 1/2% 1/1/87 

1000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 2/15/88 

2000 General Telephone of Calif. 4 1/8% 3/1/88 

1000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% 6/1/89 

1000 Southern Calif. Edison 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

2000 So. New England Tel. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 



$ 


17 


.27 




329 


52 




523 


.76 


1 


,003 


20 


2 


,949 


80 




989 


19 


1 


,982 


00 




948 


30 


3 


,034 


87 


1 


,950 


47 


3 


,037 


.02 


1 


,000 


00 


1 


,009 


90 


2 


,015 


28 


1 


,003 


78 


1 


,004 


45 


2 


,005 


58 


$24 


,804 


39 



201 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1967 

Interest income in 1967 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 



Payments per order of Bemis Fund Trustees: 

March 10 - Dorothy Rankin 

April 14 - John Kenneth Galbraith 

June 2 - Rudolf Serkin 

Dec. 15 - Robert W. Wood (expenses only) 

Printing programs and notices 

Postage and mailing 

Police attendance at lectures 

Telephone calls of Trustees 

Expense of moving Serkin piano to and 
from Lincoln 
Safe deposit box rent 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1967 



$ 989.59 

1,411.63 

9.40 





$2,410 


62 


$ 250.00 






350.00 






None 






63.35 






168.79 






226.14 






27.00 






9.30 






283.00 






3.00 






$1,380.58 






123.18 


1,503 


76 




$ 906 


86 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1967 

First National Bank of Boston 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

3000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 

1000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

2000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/2% 12/1/73 

3000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 

3000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8% 5/1/86 

1000 Virginia Electric & Power Co. 4 1/8% 10/1/86 

2000 Idaho Power Co. 4 1/2% 1/1/87 

3000 Western Mass. Electric Co. 4 3/8% 4/1/87 

1000 Idaho Power Co. 4 3/4% 11/15/87 

1000 Alabama Power Co. 3 7/8% 1/1/88 

3000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 

1000 Southern Calif. Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

3000 New England Power Co. 4 5/8% 11/1/91 

3000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RR Gen'l 4% 10/1/95 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 906.86 
625.42 
2,419.16 
2,984.25 
991.00 
1,993.75 
3,022.77 
2,913.75 
1,024.35 
2,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,010.68 
1,000.00 
3,091.14 
1,004.45 
3,041.13 



3,000 


00 


$34,028 


.71 


$ 2,077 
31,950 


95 
.76 


$34,028 


71 



202 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1967 $ 71.21 

Interest income in 1967 183.42 

Withdrawn from savings bank 60.00 

$ 314.63 
Aid to poor, per order of Selectmen $200.00 
Safe deposit box rent 3.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 58.42 261.42 

$ 53.21 



203 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1967 

First National Bank of Boston $ 53.21 

Boston 5c Savings Bank 1,095.75 

2000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/4% 5/15/74 2,000.00 

1000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 10/1/83 1,000.00 

$4,148.96 



Accumulated income $2,923.91 

Principal 1,225.05 

$4,148.96 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1967 $ 26.64 

Interest income in 1967 62 . 74 

$ 89.38 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 62. 74 

Cash balance at December 31, 1967 $ 26.64 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1967 

First National Bank of Boston $ 26.64 

Concord Cooperative Bank 1,515 . 86 

$1,542.50 



Accumulated income $ 307.50 

Principal 1,235.00 

$1,542.50 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1967 
Income received in 1967: 
Interest 
Donations : 

General Appeal (99 donors) 

Lincoln Grange 

In memory of Mrs. Mary Ryan 

July 4 parking fees 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Withdrawn from savings bank 



$ 402.11 



$ 907.49 

1,775.00 
25.00 
65.00 

1,114.66 



3,887.15 

.91 

456.32 

$4,746.49 



Payments per order of Scholarship Fund Trustees 
Balance of 1966-1967 grants: 

Janet Chisholm, Northeastern University 
Barbara Gajewski, College of Notre Dame 
Anastasia C. Mahan , Georgetown University 
First half of 1967-1968 grants: 

Susanne B. Sharpe , Chapman College 
Elizabeth H. Sturgis, Briarcliff College 
Mark Jozwicki, Northwestern University 
Maureen Finnerty , Northeastern University 
Barbara Gajewski, College of Notre Dame 
Janet Chisholm, Northeastern University 

Printing and mailing appeal letters 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Deposited in savings bank 

Cash balance at December 31, 1967 



$ 700.00 



1,485.00 



76.76 



$2,261.76 

39.39 

1,000.00 



3,301.15 
$1,445.34 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1967 



First National Bank of Boston 

Provident Institution for Savings 

3000 U. S. Treasury 5 5/8% 2/15/68 

1000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 

1000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% 6/1/89 

1000 Southern California Edison 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

5000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 

6000 Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 



Reserve for balance of 1967-1968 grants 
Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Fund 
General Fund 



$ 1,445.34 
1,799.75 
3,000.00 
994.75 
1,003.78 
1,004.45 
4,987.50 
6,016.75 

$20,252.32 

$ 1,720.00 

1,000.00 

1,520.00 

5,005.00 

11,007.32 

$20,252.32 



204 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1967 
Income received in 1967: 

Interest, net 

Trust u/w Elsie Pierce 

Fees for use of Pierce House 
Withdrawn from savings bank 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Proceeds of bonds sold: 

5000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/4% 1974 

5000 U. S. Treasury 5 5/8% 1968 

4000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 19 72 

Payments per order of Selectmen: 
Hospital bills 
Doctors* bills 
Medicines 
Special nurses 
Walden Clinic 
Well-Child Clinic 

Pierce House: 
Improvements 
Repairs 

Supplies and furnishings 
Heat, light, water, cleaning 
Care of Pierce grounds 
Safe deposit box rent 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Bonds purchased: 

1000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 
1000 International Bank for Reconstruction 
4 1/4% 1979 

Cash balance at December 31, 1967 



$ 6,729.26 

2,156.41 

360.00 



$ 4,813.75 
5,020.00 



! 17.00 
128.36 
56.87 
564.00 
910.00 
560.00 

16,165.22 
429.30 
853.92 
1,748.35 
855.00 
15.00 
296.75 

821.00 

852.50 



$ 2,013.49 



9,245.67 

1,500.00 

276.84 



$26,579.75 



24,273.27 
$ 2,306.48 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1967 

Restricted as to principal: 

Warren Institution for Savings $ 639.10 

20,000 U. S. Treasury 4% 2/15/69 19,867.50 

10,000 Southern Pac. RR Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 7/1/72 9,799.20 

20,000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 19,805.00 

10,000 Federal Land Banks 4 3/8% 4/21/75 9,925.00 

10,000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/2% 2/1/82 9,975.00 

10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 9,975.00 

5,000 Southern New Eng. Telephone 5 3/4% 11/1/96 5,014.20 

10,000 Florida Power & Light Co. 6% 12/1/96 10,000.00 

10,000 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 4 5/8% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

10,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 3/4% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

$115,000.00 



205 



Unrestricted: 

First National Bank of Boston 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

3,500 U. S. Treasury 3 7/8% 5/15/68 

2,000 Southern Rwy. Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 10/15/72 

3,000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

5,000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1/15/79 

5,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Power Co. 4 1/8% 10/1/86 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8% 5/1/86 

5,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 



$ 2,306.48 
2,858.96 
2,745.41 
3,500.00 
1,978.39 
2,973.00 
4,904.56 
4,856.00 
1,024.45 
2,913.75 
5,108.42 

$150,169.42 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1967 

Interest income in 1967 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 



Waverly Post Band, part of July 4 celebration expense, 

per order Trust Fund Commissioners 
Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Cash balance at December 31, 1967 



$200.00 
21.77 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1967 



121.19 



First National Bank of Boston 

Boston 5c Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

1000 Southern Rwy. Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 10/15/72 

1000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 10/1/83 

1000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 

1000 Virginia Elec. & Power 4 1/8% 10/1/86 

1000 Southern Calif. Edison 4 1/2% 2/15/90 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 445.37 

5,197.62 

$ 5,642.99 



2Q6 



LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1967 
Income received in 1967: 

Julia A. Bemis Fund 

Codman Fund 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 

Edith B. Farrar Fund 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

John H. Pierce Fund 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

Lincoln Library Fund 
Donations received : 

Mrs. Bradford Cannon, for the DeNormandie Room 

In memory of Mrs. Richard J. (Gertrude) Eaton 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Withdrawn from savings bank accounts : 

Codman Fund 

Farnsworth Fund 

Farrar Fund 

Stearns Fund 

Payments per order of Library Trustees, for books: 

From Cannon donations 

From Eaton donations 

From trust fund income 
Maryalice Thoma, Librarian, Pierce Fund income 
Safe deposit box rent 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Deposited in savings banks 
Cash balance at December 31, 1967 



: 32.30 
21.97 
28.89 
24.92 
28.03 
6.72 
59.38 
19.74 
84.34 

148.68 
52.93 
93.38 



76.63 



601.28 

100.00 

666.00 

8.52 

23.29 
50.00 
28.98 
28.16 





$ 


1,582 


86 


$100.64 








47.65 








414.30 








59.38 








2.00 








210.02 








10.68 




844 


67 




$ 


738 


19 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1967 

Principal 



Income 
on deposit 



Julia A. Bemis Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Codman Fund 



Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 
Boston 5c Savings Bank 

Edith B. Farrar Fund 
Boston 5c Savings Bank 



$ 96.66 



26.64 



17.81 



32.40 



$684.05 



474.59 



500.00 



440.00 



Total 
$ 780.71 

501.23 

517.81 

472.40 



207 



Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 
Boston 5c Savings Bank 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

John H. Pierce Fund 

1000 S. New Eng. Tel. 5 3/4% 1996 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



George Russell Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

1000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



George G. Tarbell Fund 

1000 So. Bell Tel. 4% 1983 
1000 Western Mass. Elec. 4 3/8% 1987 
1000 So. New Eng. Tel. 5 3/4% 1996 
Warren Institution for Savings 



Income 
on deposit 



$ 50.56 



C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
1000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Lincoln Library Fund 

1000 So. New Eng. Tel. 5 3/4% 1996 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



First National Bank of Boston 
Balance of Cannon donations 
Balance of Eaton donations 
Other income 



61.71 



Principal Total 
$ 500.00 $ 550.56 



158.89 



1,000.00 

114.57 

1,114.57 



415.74 



158.89 



1,000.00 

114.57 

1,114.57 



477.45 



- 


991.00 


991.00 


76.95 


939.00 


1,015.95 




1,930.00 


2,006.95 


. 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


- 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


- 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


98.26 


138.38 


236.64 




3,138.38 


3,236.64 




991.00 


991.00 


38.25 


244.46 


282.71 




1,235.46 


1,273.71 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 


259.32 


678.21 


937.53 




1,678.21 


1,937.53 


100.44 




100.44 


618.35 


- 


618.35 


19.40 


- 


19.40 


$1,496.75 


$12,269.89 


$13,766.64 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 



Cash Account 



Savings bank interest received in 1967, paid to Town of Lincoln 



52.96 



Savings Bank Deposits at December 31, 1967 



Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Cambridge Savings Bank 



208 



$ 722.00 

495.52 

$ 1,217.52 



LINCOLN 

MASSACHUSETTS 



inancial Section and Warrant for the 

1967 Annual Town Meeting 



; V n- -x/; 




Town Hall 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

REPORT 

of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

1966 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Highlights of Recommended Budget for 1967 



The Finance Committee Report and its recommended budget 
for 1967 is being published as a "Financial Section to the 1966 
Town Report". This section also carries the Town Warrant and 
the report of the Long Term Capital Requirements Committee. 

We recommend the adoption of the appropriation for Gen- 
eral Purposes in 1967 itemized in the Financial Supplement, 
which totals $1,916,749. A comparison of the 1967 and 1966 
budgets and the percentage change in each category is given be- 
low. 

1967 Budget 1966 Budget $ Change % Change 



General Government 


81,450 


71,619 


+ 9,831 


+ 13.7 


Protection of Persons 










& Property 


144,220 


132,620 


+ 12,210 


+ 9.2 


Health & Sanitation 


19,850 


18,820 


+ 1,030 


+ 5.5 


Public Works 


145,912 


140,723 


+ 5,189 


+ 3.7 


Public Welfare 


22,215 


19,040 


+ 3,175 


+ 16.7 


Elementary Schools 


850,919 


783,322 


+ 67,597 


+ 8.6 


Regional High School 


340,374 


298,926 


+ 41,448 


+ 13.9 


Library 


44,716 


40,210 


+ 4,506 


+ 11.2 


Recreation 


11,240 


10,385 


+ 855 


+ 8.2 


Cemeteries 


4,100 


4,100 








Town Debt Service 


177,548 


179,975 


- 2,427 


- 2.1 


Unclassified 


61,205 


61,203 


+ 2 





Reserve Fund 


13,000 
,916,749 


13,000 
1,773,943 








1 


+ 143,416 


+ 8.0 



The 1967 budget is $142,806 more than 1966. Of this 
amount $67,597 (47.6%) is for the Elementary Schools, $41,448 
(29.2%) for Regional High School, and $33,761 (23.2%) for all 
other Town services. Education accounts for 76.8% of the to- 
tal increase. To state it another way, education as a per- 
centage of the total General Purposes budget has grown slightly 
from 69.6% of the 1966 budget to 70.0% of the proposed 1967 bud- 
get. 

1967 1966 









% of 


Total 





i of 


Total 






Budget 
850,919 


Budget 


Budget 
783, 322 


Bu< 


Iget 


Elementary Schools 




44.4 


44.2 


Elementary School 
















Debt Service 




150,475 




7.8 


153,770 




8.6 


Total, Elementary 
















Schools 


1 


,001,394 




52.2 


937,092 




52.8 


Total Regional 
















High School 




340,374 




17.8 


298,926 




16.8 




1 


,341,768 




70.0 


1,236,018 




69.6 



In addition, we recommend adoption of the budget for 
the Water Department which totals $107,399. 

In accordance with the By-Laws, the hearing on the 
Elementary School budget was held in conjunction with the 
School Committee on February 2, 1967. The public hearing on 
the general budget is scheduled for Monday, February 27, 1957, 
at the Town Hall at 8:00 p.m. 

Comments on Selected Expenses 

In keeping with Town policy and inflationary pre 
wages of Town employees have been increased to keep the wa> 
levels commensurate with remuneration paid by selected adjc 
ing towns for comparable jobs. 

In 1966, the budget for Consulting and Engineering was 
$12,500. In 1967, the figure is only $5,000. The reason 
for the apparent decrease is that in 1967 each of the Town 
activities incurring such expenses are providing for these ex- 
penses within their respective budgets. . The total Consulting 
and Engineering expenses budgeted for the Town for 1967 are 
approximately $19,000, the largest part of which reflects 
higher anticipated needs of the Conservation Commission. 

Part of the increase in the Public Works budget reflects 
a full year's salary for the Director of Public Works, hired in 
April, 1966. This position should bring about better utili- 
zation of men, equipment and purchasing by improving coordina- 
tion of activities in the Water, Highway and Park Departments. 
Continued progress and savings are anticipated in this area. 

Comments on Tax Rate 

The best figure available at this time for the assessed 
valuation of the Town is approximately $40,400,000 (compared to 
$38,017,060 in 1966). Thus, excluding changes in income and 
expenses from State, County, and other governmental agencies, 
expenses could rise by $84,000 without increasing the tax rate. 
Another way of expressing the impact of expenses on the tax 
rate is that each $40,000 of expenses amounts to $1.00 on the 
tax rate. Because we cannot at this time predict: (1) these 
non-Town income and expense items; (2) what warrant articles 
will be approved by the Town; and (3) certain other matters 
which will affect the tax rate, we cannot indicate the probable 
1967 tax rate. Although the tax rate is set by the Board of 
Assessors, we will endeavor to have an estimate of it available 
for the Town Meeting. 

Unexpended 1966 Appropriations 

The various departments returned to the treasury a total 
of $54,512 of unexpended appropriations. The following is a 
list of all that exceeded $1,000.00. 



1, 


291 


2, 


013 


7 , 


374 


1, 


123 


6, 


334 


2, 


635 


5, 


229 


2, 


678 


3, 


735 


2, 


530 


3, 


072 



Planning Board 
Consulting & Engineering 
Park Department - 

Salaries & Wages 
Board of Health - 

Garbage Collection 
Highway Maintenance 
Elementary School Administration 
Elementary School Instruction 
Elementary School, Other 

Services 
Library Salaries & Wages 
Recreation, Swimming 
Property & Indemnity Insurance 
Interest on Tax Anticipation 

Notes 1,321 

Reserve Account Transfers 

The Finance Committee allocated a total of $10,877.53 
in 1966 out of the $13,000 Reserve. Account appropriated for 
emergencies and unforeseen requirements as follows: 

Civil Defense 1,000.00 

Veterans' Services 1,000.00 

Election Officials 227.50 

Legal 250.00 

Town Clerk, Expense 34.86 
Town Hall, Maintenance & Expense 1,531.63 

Police, Expense 935.53 

Fire & Police Building 708.19 

Inspection Fees 1,221.00 

Highway Building 821.87 

Highway Equipment Maintenance 54.36 

Highways, Snow & Ice 2,735.59 
Board of Health, Inspection 

Service 313.85 

Celebrations Committee 43.15 



10,877.53 



Free Cash Position 



The Commonwealth has certified "Free Cash" as of January 
1, 1967 to be $103,247. This compares with: 

January 1, 1966 142,681 

January 1, 1965 197,979 

January 1, 1964 119,813 

January 1, 1963 131,297 

January 1, 1962 171,213 

January 1, 1961 148,603 

January 1, 1960 124,809 

This fund is certified annually by the State Bureau of 



Accounts by deducting from Surplus -Revenue all uncollected 
taxes for prior years. 

The Town Warrant accompanies this report. Recommenda- 
tions of the Committee on pertinent articles will be made at 
the Town Meeting. 

Respectfully submitted: 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Louis C. Farley, Jr. 

Arthur E. Thiessen 

Walter J. Salmon 

J. David Hopkins 

Leo A. Palmer. Chairman 



SCHEDULE OF APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES OF 1966 
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 1967 



Appropriation 
1966 


Expenditures 
1966 


Recommendations 
1967 




GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
($81,450 - 4.2%) 




EXECUTIVE 








Selectmen 

2. Salaries 

3. Selectmen's 

Personal Exp. 

4. Expenses 

5. Out of State 

Travel 


$ 300.00 

300.00 
500.00 

300.00 
1,400.00 


$ 300.00 

300.00 
390.00 


$ 300.00 

300.00 
500.00 

600.00 




990.00 


1,700.00 


Executive Secretary 

6. Executive Sec. 

Salary 

7. Expenses 


12,100.00 

300.00 

12,400.00 


12,100.00 

254.00 

12,354.00 


12,700.00 

800.00 

13,500.00 



Finance Committee 
10. Expense 



25.00 



15.00 



25.00 



Town Office 

15. Clerks, Sal 

16. Expense 



IS, 500.00 

3,750.00 

19,250.00 



14,915.00 

3,708.00 

18,623.00 



20,230.00* 

2,935.00 
23,165.00 



* Includes $1,050 to be taken from Water Dept. Surplus 



Town Accountant 

20. Salary 

21. Expense 



4,594.00 

265.00 

4,859.00 



4,594.00 

133.00 

4,727.00 



4,830.00 

265.00 

5,095.00 



Treasurer & Collector 

30. Salary 3,150.00 

31. Expense 2, 180.00 

5,330.00 



2,907.00 
1,242.00 
4,149.00 



700.00* 
2,565.00 
3,265.00 



Includes $525 to be taken from Water Dept. Surplus 



Assessors 








50. Salaries 


550.00 


550.00 


550.00 


51. Expense 


700.00 


572.00 


1,700.00 




1,250.00 


1,122.00 


2,250.00 



K 



Appropriation 
1966 



Expenditures 
1966 



Recommendations 
1967 



Law 

55. Legal 

56. Expense 



Town Clerk 

60. Salary 

61. Expense 



000.00 
200.00 



3,200.00 



600.00 

75.00 

675.00 



Election & Registration 

70. Registrars' Sal. 200.00 

71. Election officials 200.00 

72. Expense 900.00 

1,350.00 



Planning Board 

80. Expense 

Board of Appeals 

81. Expense 

Conservation Commission 

82. Expense 



1,780.00 



250.00 



200.00 



Consulting & Engineering 
85. Expense 12,500.00 



Town Hall 

90. Custodian 

91. Maint. & Exp. 



2,500.00 
4,650.00 
7,150.00 



$ 3,250.00 

140.00 

3,390.00 



600.00 
110.00 
710.00 



200.00 

477.00 

600.00 

1,277.00 



489.00 



87.00 



33.00 



10,499.00 



2,449.00 



8,631.00 



$ 4,000.00 
200.00 



4 


200 


00 


1 


000 
100 


00 
00 


1 


100 


00 




200 
125 
900 


00 
00 
00 


1 


225 


00 


5 


830 


00 




250 


00 


8 


000 


00 


5 


000 


00 


2 
4 


630 

215 


00 
00 


6 


845 


00 



TOTALS FOR GENERAL 
GOVERNMENT 



$ 71,619.00 



$67,096.00 



$ 81,450.00 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
($144,220 - 7.7%) 




Police Department 

100. Salaries 

101. Expense 

102. Police Cruiser 



48,160.00 
4,460.00 
2,200.00 

54,820.00 



47,975.00 
5,396.00 
2,200.00 

55,571.00 



54,330.00 
3,725.00 
2,000.00 

60,055.00 



Fire Department 
110. Salaries & 
wages 

112. Expense 

113. Hydrant 

service 



32,810.00 
4,715.00 

14,950.00 
52,475.00 



32,665.00 
4,670.00 

14,950.00 
52,285.00 



35,143.00 
5,109.00 

14,950.00 
55,202.00 







Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1966 1966 1967 

Communications 

121. Wages $ 14,175.00 $ 14,003.00 $ 15,860.00 

122. Expense 4,290.00 3,901.00 4,492.00 

18,465.00 17,904.00 

Civil Defense 

123. Expense 1,000.00 2,099.00 R 

Fire & Police Bldq. 

125. Maint. & Exp. 3,060.00 3,768.00 R 

126. Outside rentals 800.00 700.00 

3,860.00 4,468.00 

Inspectors of Bldqs. 

128. Inspection fees 

& transportation 1,900.00 3,121.00 R 

129. Expense 100.00 80.00 

2,000.00 3,201.00 

Park Department 

(See Highways) (20,275.00) 



TOTALS FOR PROTECTION 

OF PERSONS AND 

PROPERTY $ 132,620.00 $ 135,528.00 $ 144,220.00 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 
($19,850 - 1.0%) 

Board of Health 

200. Salaries 5,420.00 4,968.00 5,500.00 



20,352.00 






ftp 


1.00 


^ s 


3,110.00 




800.00 




3,910.00 




4,600.00 




100.00 




4,700.00 





^201. Expense 3,050.00 3,046.00 3,400.00 
202. Inspection 

Service 1,250.00 1,564.00 R 1,750.00 

9,720.00 9,578.00 10,650.00 

Sanitation 
210. Garbage 

Collection 9,000.00 7,877.00 9,100.00 

Inspector of Animals 

230. Salary 100.00 100.00 100.00 



TOTALS FOR HEALTH 

AND SANITATION $ 18,820.00 $ 17,555.00 $ 19,850.00 







Appropriation 


Expenditures 


Recommendations 






1966 


1966 


1967 




PUBLIC 


WORKS 








($145,912 


- 7.6%) 




Public Works 








300. 


Salaries & 










wages 


$ 55,000.00 


$ 46,736.00 


$ 58,122.00 


302. 


Road Maint. 


23,400.00 


17,066.00 


25,100.00 


303. 


Expense, 
equip. & 




13,672.00 R 






supplies 


13,150.00 


14,050.00 


304. 


Snow & Ice 
control & 










removal 


13,500.00 


16,236.00 R 


14,000.00 


305. 


Street Lights 


7,948.00 


7,543.*00 


8,300.00 






112,9.98.00 


101,253.00 


119,572.00 


Publ 


ic Works Bldq. 








310. 


Maint. & Exp. 


3,725.00 


4,547.00 R 


2,340.00 


320. 


Chapter 90 M. 


9,000.00 


9,000.00 


9,000.00* 


321. 


Chapter 90 C. 


15,000.00 
27,725.00 





15,000.00* 




13,547.00 


26,340.00 



* State and County share of $17,250 to be 
taken from free cash and returned when 
received. 



TOTALS FOR 
PUBLIC WORKS 



$140,723.00 



$ 114,800.00 



$145,912.00 



PUBLIC WELFARE 
($22,215 - 1.1%) 



400. Aid to R 

Citizens 17,000.00 17,086.00 

401. Admn. Salary 1,340.00 1,340.00 

402. Expense 200.00 199.00 

403. Veterans' Serv. 500.00 655.00 R 



20,000.00 

1,515.00 

200.00 

500.00 



TOTALS FOR PUBLIC 
WELFARE 



$ 19,040.00 $ 19,280.00 



$ 22,215.00 



EDUCATION 
($1,191,293 - 62.9%) 



501. Administration 
501a. Out of State 

Travel 

502. Instruction 

503. Other School 

Services 



31,296.00 

2,475.00 
550,502.00 

52,402.00 



28,686.00 

2,056.00 
545,273.00 

49,724.00 



35,700.00 

2,500.00 
617,009.00* 

54,550.00 



Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1966 1966 1967 

Education/ cont. 

504. Operation & R 

Maint. $ 112,313.00 $ 112,323.00 $ 125,464.00 
507. Acquisition 

of fixed 

assets 32,284.00 32,284.00 11,746.00 

509. Programs with 

other 

systems 2,050.00 1,419.00 3,950.00 

* Of this .sum $961.23 to be taken from 
DeCordova School Equipment Fund - 
$51.34 from Grammar School Fund and 
$11,745.04 from P. L. 864 and P. L. 874 

510. Regional High 

School 298,926.00 298,926.00 340,374.00 

TOTALS FOR 

SCHOOLS $ 1,082,248.00 $ 1,070,691.00 $ 1,191,293.00 

LI BRARY 
($44,716 - 2.3%) 

Library 

520. Salaries 24,412.00 20,681.00 26,900.00* 

521. Books & 

Records 8,100.00 8,077.00 10,000.00** 

522. Expense 935.00 824.00 1,215.00 

523. Out of State 

Travel 115.00 



33,562.00 29,582.00 38,115.00 
* $838.61 to be taken from Dog Tax Receipts 
** $1,403.25 to be taken from State Aid to Libraries 

Library Building 

530. Custodian's 

wages 1,833.00 1,812.00 1,911.00 

531. Maintenance 

& Expense 4,815.00 



6,648.00 5,836.00 6,601.00 



TOTALS FOR 

LIBRARY $ 40,210.00 $ 35,418.00 $ 44,716.00 



Appropriation 
1966 



Expenditures 
1966 



600. Salaries 
602. Expense 
604. Swimming 
program 

TOTALS FOR 
RECREATION 



700. Interments 
702. Maintenance 
& Expense 

TOTALS FOR 
CEMETERIES 



RECREATION 
($11,240 - 0.6%) 



$ 6,435.00 
1, 350.00 

2,000.00 



$ 10, 385.00 



$ 6,057.00 
1,188.00 

70.00 



Recommendations 
1967 



$ 6,610.00 
2,010.00 



$ 7,315.00 



CEMETERIES 
($4 ,.100 - 0.2%) 

600.00 

3, 500.00 



$ 4,100.00 



260.00 
2, 592.00 



$ 2,852.00 



TOWN DEBT SERVICE 
($176,235 - 9.2%) 



802. Fire & Police 

Bldg. Bonds 

803. Int. on Fire 

& Police 
Bldg. Bonds 

804. Int. on Tax 

Notes 

805. School Bldg. 

Bonds 

806. Int. on Sen. 

Bldg. Bonds 

807. Library Bldg. 

Bonds 

808. Int. on Library 

Bldg. Bonds 

809. Land Purchase 

Bonds 

810. Int. on Land 

Purchase Bds. 

TOTALS FOR TOWN 
DEBT SERVICE 



5,000.00 

2,160.00 

8,000.00 

115,000.00 

38,770.00 

5,000.00 

625.00 

5,000.00 

420.00 

$ 179,975.00 



5,000.00 

2,160.00 

6,679.00 

115,000.00 

38,770.00 

5,000.00 

625.00 

5,000.00 

420.00 

$ 178,654.00 



2,620.00 



$ 11,240.(^0 



600.00 
3, V 5€IP.00 



$ 4,100.00 



5,000.00 

1,980.00 

8,000.00 

115,000.00 

35,475.00 

5,000.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

1,593.00 

$ 177,548.00 



10 



Appropriation 
1966 



Expenditures 
1966 



Recommendations 
1967 



UNCLASSIFIED 
(.$61,205 - 3.2%) 



900. Middlesex Co. 

Pension Fund $ 17,955.00 

901. Emp. Ins. & 

Hosp. Fund 16,498.00 

902. Prop. & Indem. 

Insurance 19,000.00 

903. Dump rent & 

maintenance 4,500.00 

904. Printing & 

distrib. Town 

Reports 3,000.00 

905. Preservation of 

Town Records 250.00 



TOTALS FOR 
UNCLASSIFIED 

Reserve Fund 
GRAND TOTAL 



950. Salaries 

951. Wages 

952. General Exp. 

953. Water Supply 

Expense 

954. Water Trans. 

Expense 

955. Bonds 

956. Interest on 

Bonds 

TOTALS WATER 
DEPARTMENT 



$ 61,203.00 



13,000.00 



$ 17,839.00 

15,620.00 

15,928.00 

4,500.00 

2,455.00 
159.00 

$ 56,501.00 
(10,878.00) 



$ 17,955.00 

16,500.00 

19,000.00 

4,500.00 

3,000.00 
250.00 

$ 61,205.00 
13,000.00 



$ 1,773,943.00 $ 1,705,690.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

8,123/00 8,045.00 

12,000.00 9,553.00 

3,000.00 2,624.00 

8,500.00 8,409.00 



$ 1,916,749.00 



' %I7</ 



10,500.00 
26,000.00 

5,283.00 



73,406.00 



9, 788.00 
26,000.00 

5, 283.00 



69,702.00 



8,265.00 

11,000.00 

5,000.00 

27,500.00 

23,500.00 
26,000.00 

6,134.00 



$ 107,399.00 



•o 



Items #950, #951, #952, #955 to be taken from 

Water Department Revenue. 

Item #953 - $10,000 to be taken from Water Dept. 

Revenue; $17,500 to be taken from 

Water Dept. Surplus. 
Item #954 - $16,000 to be taken from Water Dept. 

Revenue; $7,500 to be taken from 

Water Dept. Surplus 
Item #956 - $105.14 to be taken from Premium on 

Water Loan; the balance from Water 

Dept. Revenue 
11 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

REPORT 

of the 

LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 

1966 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

1966 Report of the 
Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee 



During the past year in the field of long-term planning 
land acquisitions were completed on six pieces of property and 
negotiations are under way with respect to acquiring 800 to 
1000 additional acres. A substantial portion of the expense 
for these properties will be sought from Federal and Common- 
wealth funds. 

The School Building Needs Committee is currently review- 
ing the departmental needs and is not expected to complete its' 
study for another year. Barring some unforeseen housing ex- 
pansion, the present classroom space should be adequate for 
approximately 3 years. There is real need currently for ad- 
ditional library and gymnasium space. In 1970 more additions 
are planned for the Regional School. 

Thanks to the new well, the total water needs of the 
Town are adequately covered for the foreseeable future. Since 
Concord will no longer be drawing water from Sandy Pond Reser- 
voir, this, coupled with normal rainfall, should allow the 
Pond to regain its' normal level. 

The Town will again be asked to vote on the proposed 
bicycle path running from Lincoln Center to South Lincoln. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Donald J. Natoli, Chairman 1967 

Henry W. Spencer 1968 

James E. Duffy, III 1969 



13 





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18 



EXAMINATION OF DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 



2. LIBRARY 

The $25,000 requested for 1968 is to cover expansion of 
present book shelf space to provide storage for 38,000 volumes 
as recommended by the American Library Association. 

3. PLANNING BOARD AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

The land acquisition project which is called the "By '70 
Plan" is based on the Land Use Report. Negotiations have been 
completed on six pieces of property and are under way with res- 
pect to acquiring 800 to 1000 additional acres. Federal finan- 
cing will be sought for 50% of the required funds and an addi- 
tional amount - approximately 25% - will be sought from the Com- 
monwealth. The balance will be funded over a twenty-year per- 
iod. 

The Town Atlas is planned as 'a series of maps and aerial 
photographs for use in assessing, planning, subdivision proceed- 
ings and general town operations. 

5. SELECTMEN 

A. Protection of Persons and Property 

(1) Police Department 

Experience indicates that one of the two 
cruisers should be replaced each year. Average annual mileage 
is 40,000 on each unit. 

(2) Fire Department 

The present fire station in North Lincoln is 
inadequate. A new station is planned near the intersection of 
Bedford Road and Route 2 on land currently owned by the Town. 
A decision on relocating Route 2 is expected soon. When that 
has been resolved, the plan is to proceed with the new fire sta- 
tion as quickly as possible. The cost of this Fire Station is 
estimated to be approximately $70,000. 

B. Highway Department 

(1) Bicycle Paths 

The proposed paths along Lincoln Road will be 
reconsidered at the 1967 Annual Town Meeting. 

(2) Road Construction 

The normally planned annual expenditure of 
$25,000 is earmarked for widening and repairing Route 126 and 

19 



feeder roads. 

(3) Chapter 90 Construction 

The normal planned appropriation has been 
reduced to $15,000 for 1967 and the years following. The mon- 
ey is earmarked for expenditure on Route 117, Route 126, and 
Codman Road. 

(4) Equipment 

Normal planned expenditure is $6,000 annually 
for replacement of equipment. 

C. Town Dump 

The National Park plans to take over the present 
dump site. The proposed new dump will be located between 
Routes 2 and 2A and will be utilized on a sanitary-fill basis 
over a five-year period. It is planned thereafter to join a 
regional incinerator operation. 

6. LINCOLN SCHOOLS 

The $500,000 expenditure scheduled for 1969 is for addi- 
tional class rooms, library and gymnasium at the Brooks School. 

7. STABILIZATION FUND 

As of December 31, 1966, there is approximately $93,000 
in the Stabilization Fund. Of this amount, about $52,500 has 
been earmarked for school purposes and $36,500 for general 
equipment. The balance is unallocated. 

8. CONSERVATION FUND 

As recommended in the "By '70 Plan", it is planned to 
make large scale land acquisitions over the next four years. 
For this program $400,000 will be allocated over the four-year 
period. 

10. LINCOLN- SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT (Grades 9-12) 

As noted in the 1964 Long-Term Capital Requirements Com- 
mittee Report, as part of the planning for the current addition 
to the Regional High School, a Master Plan has been developed 
which will allow for the orderly expansion of the school to an 
estimated needed capacity of 3,000 pupils. The next addition 
to the school will be needed in 1971, with an appropriation for 
planning of $30,000 required in 1969 and $2,000,000 for con- 
struction in 1970. Based on current projections, Lincoln's 
share of these expenditures will be 25%, with planning costs 
completely reimbursable by the State. Future capital costs 
for schools at the high school level are based on the assumption 

20 



that the Regional School District will continue as presently 
organized. A decision to dissolve the District at any time 
in the future would necessitate a complete revaluation of cap- 
ital costs and no such decision should be made until all 
factors are weighed with extreme care. 



21 



Table III 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 
1966 Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee Report 

TOTAL 1966 EXPENDITURES AND RECEIPTS - SUMMARY 

RECEIPTS 

1) 1966 taxes on property collected in 1966 $1,295,814.44 

2) Taxes on property levied in prior years 

and collected in 1966 29,553.60 

3) Excise taxes collected in 1966 (chiefly 

motor vehicles) 146,002.18 

4) Receipts from Commonwealth of Mass. 

(other than items 5 and 6) 182,153.57 

5) Chapter 90 highway and construction 

assistance from State and County 3,784.77 

6) State School Building Assistance payments 42,833.87 

7) Hanscom School Building operation for 

Air Force 648,655.59 

8) Federal receipts and grants (other than 

item 7) 49,040.64 

9) Other current receipts 843,557.92 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $3,241,396.58* 

* Excluding amounts borrowed in anticipation of 
1966 taxes and amounts withheld from town em- 
ployees' salary payments totalling $948,092.77 

10) Water Department revenues, including 

$70,000 from loans $ 160,212.69 



EXPENDITURES 

11) Total 1966 Town expenditures $3,497,077.11 

12) Water Department expenditures 143,641.78 

13) Total 1966 Town and Water Department 

expenditures $3,640,718.89 

14) 1966 Capital Expenditures (see Table II) 68,820.50 

15) 1966 Current Expenditures (13 minus 14) 

but including payments on Town and 

District debt $3,571,898.39* 

* Excluding payments of tax anticipation notes 
and town employees' salary withholdings 
totalling $872,850.51 



22 



Table IV 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 
1966 Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee Report 



1966 VITAL STATISTICS 



1) Town Debt, December 31, 1966 $ 1,521,000.00 
Water Debt included in total 198,000.00 

2) Town Borrowing Capacity, January 1, 1967 $ 1,048,815.00 

3) Free Cash, January 1, 1967 $ 103,247.67 

4) 1966 Assessed Valuations: 

a) Real and Personal Property $38,017,060.00 

b) Motor Vehicles 2,593,830.00 

5) 1966 Tax Levies: 

a) Real and Personal Property $ 1,330,597.10 

b) Motor Vehicles $ 158,337.05 

6) 1966 Tax Rates per $1000 of 
Assessed Valuation: 

a) Town of Lincoln - Real and 

Personal Property 

b) Mass. Motor Vehicle Excise rate 

7) Town Stabilization Fund, December 31, 1966: 

a) Tentatively earmarked for future 

school construction 

b) Tentatively earmarked for future 

equipment purchases 

c) Unearmarked 

Stabilization Fund Balance 

8) Town Conservation Fund, Dec. 31, 1966: 



$ 
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66.00 


$ 


52,460.00 


$ 
$ 


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4,022.02 


$ 


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$ 


231.98 



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WARRANT 
1967 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in 
said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify the legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qual- 
ified to vote in Town Meeting for the transaction of 
Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks School Auditorium in 
said Lincoln on Monday, the twentieth day of March next, 
at 7:30 o'clock P. M. , then and there" to act on the fol- 
lowing articles, except Article 1, and also to meet at 
the Fire and Police Building on Saturday, the twenty- 
fifth day of March next, at eight o'clock A. M. , then 
and there to act on the following Article 1, by posting 
a copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, 
seven days at least before the twentieth day of March 
next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Saturday, 
March twenty-fifth, will be opened at 8 o'clock A. M. , 
and may be closed at 7 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one member 
for each of the following offices: 

Town Clerk for one year 
Selectman for three years 
Assessor for three years 
Treasurer for one year 
Collector for one year 
School Committee member for 

three years 
Regional School Committee 

member for three years 



25 



Water Commissioner for three years 
Board of Health member for three years 
Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
Planning Board member for five years 
Planning Board member for three years 
Commissioner of Trust Funds for three 

years 
Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 
Director of DeCordova and Dana Museum 

and Park for four years 

and also the following question: 

"Shall the town pay one half the premium costs payable 
by retired employees for group life insurance and for 
group general or blanket hospital, surgical and medical 
insurance? " 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers required by 
v- law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be auth- 
orized to employ for additional compensation any of its 
members and to fix additional compensation of such mem- 
bers. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 6. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 



26 



\J 



Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in antici- 
pation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
January 1, 1968, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year, in 
accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $15,000.00 to be added to the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of 
the Town under Article 2 3 of the Annual Meeting on March 
16, 1959, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 8. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 to be added to the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of 
the Town under Article 2 3 of the Annual Meeting on March 
16, 1959, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 9. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 to be added to the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of 
the Town under Article 2 3 of the Annual Meeting on March 
16, 1959, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 10. To determine whether the Town will author- 
ize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to 
continue the Town's annual contract with U. S. Commission- 
er of Education to operate the elementary school at L. G. 
Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

School Committee and Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
support the School Committee in its continuing plan to 
bring a limited number of children from underprivileged 
areas to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of education, 
at no expense to the Town of Lincoln. 

School Committee 
27 



ARTICLE 12. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $403.10 to pay the 
following unpaid 1965 and 1966 bills, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Legal expenses $103.10 

Board of Health 

Expense 300.00 

Town Accountant 

ARTICLE 13 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $18,700.00, or any other sum, 
for the purchase of equipment for the use of various 
Public Works Departments, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To determine whether the Town will accept 
the provisions of Section 34 of Chapter 82 of the Gen- 
eral Laws authorizing the Selectmen to reserve spaces 
between the side lines of town ways for bicycle paths 
and other purposes set forth in said section, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 15. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate a sum of money to lay out and 
construct a bicycle path, partly within the boundaries 
of Lincoln Road, and partly on private lands, from ap- 
proximately the Library to the Railroad Station Parking 
area, including a path from approximately the Old Town 
Hall to the Brooks School, all as shown on a plan en- 
titled "Lincoln Road Layout, Including Bicycle Path, 
Lincoln, Mass. ", dated February 7, 1966, as revised by 
Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, Consulting Engineers, present- 
ly on file in the office of the Town Clerk; for said pur- 
poses to acquire necessary easements or interests in fee 
by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, from pri- 
vate owners wherever shown on said plan; and to provide 
said sum by taxation or from free cash or partly from 
each, all under the authority of General Laws, Chapter 



28 



82, Section 35, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

Selectmen and Planning Board 

ARTICLE 16. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $1,500.00, or any other sum, 
for the use of the Celebrations Committee established 
by vote of the Town on March 22, 1965, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 17. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to join the Regional Vocational School District, . as 
authorized by Chapter 513 of the Acts of 1966, appoint 
three members to a special unpaid committee, to be known 
as a vocational regional school district planning com- 
mittee, and appropriate the sum of $250.00 for the use 
of said committee, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 18. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to create a Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee, 
consisting of three persons to be appointed by the Mod- 
erator, and to authorize said Committee to join with 
other such committees from two or more contiguous cities 
or towns to form a Regional Refuse Disposal Planning- 
Board, all pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 748 of 
the Acts of 1965, or to take any action relative there- 
to. 

Selectmen and Planning Board 

ARTICLE 19. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to authorize the Selectmen to establish a sanitary fill 
operation for the dumping of refuse for residents of the 
Town, to acquire a site for such dump by lease, purchase, 
eminent domain or otherwise, and to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the cost of such acquisition and the 
cost of operation of such dump for the period ending at 
the next annual Town Meeting, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
29 



ARTICLE 20. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to replace the existing fire alarm system connecting 
the Fire and Police Station to the Town Hall, and to 
raise and appropriate a sum of money therefor, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to enable the Board of Selectmen, on behalf of the Town, 
to lease to Murray and Patricia F. Horwitz, for a term 
of 30 years, a rectangular parcel of land, approximate- 
ly 180 feet by 200 feet, adjacent to the eastern bound- 
ary of Lot A-2, as shown on a plan by Snelling, Hilton 
and Associates, dated July 30, 1966, in return for cer- 
tain rights of way and agreement by the lessees to build 
and maintain, at the sole expense of the lessees, a pond 
suitable for f ish, wildlife, and fire protection, as 
recommended by the U. S. Conservation Service and the 
Fire Department of the Town of Lincoln. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 22. To determine whether the Town will vote 
to rescind the remaining unissued balance of the Water 
Loan authorized by vote of the Town under Article 1 of 
a Special Town Meeting, held on November 1, 1965, said 
balance being $20,000.00. 

Water Commissioners 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the 
time for the meeting aforesaid. Given under our hands 
this 13th day of February in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and sixty- seven. 



Elliott V. Grabill 
Russell L. Haden, Jr. 
Harold E. Lawson 

SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



30 



LINCOLN 

Massachusetts 



L968 ANNUAL REPORT 






4 I 
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IflMI IB II 

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CODMAN HOUSE 



"Watercolor painting 

for the 1968 Town Report 

by Foster Nystrom." 



CONTENTS 



Page 

TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 4 

Town Clerk 14 

FINANCE 

Treasurer 41 

Town Accountant 47 

Collector of Taxes 74 

Board of Assessors 76 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Departments 79 

Civil Defense 83 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 85 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 88 

Board of Appeals 9 3 

Board of Water Commissioners 95 

Public Works Department 99 

Cemetery Commissioners 104 

Mosquito Control Study Committee 105 
Inspectors of Building, Wiring 

and Plumbing 107 

Conservation Commission 108 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 110 

Minute Man Park Advisory Commission 112 



Page 
SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

Lincoln Public Library 115 

Recreation Committee 119 

Celebrations Committee 125 

Bemis Fund Trustees 127 

DeCordova Museum 129 

Scholarship Fund Trustees 134 

Elementary Schools 135 

Regional School 170 

Student Exchange Committee 185 

Regional Agreement Study Committee 186 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 193 

Valuation List 198 

Trust Funds 228 



REPORT 
of the 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 
FOR THE YEAR 1968 





Lincoln, Massachusetts 



SELECTMEN 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

PLANNING BOARD 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1968 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



ANNUAL ELECTION OF 
TOWN OFFICERS 



QUALIFICATION FOR 
REGISTRATION 



TOWN OFFICES 



TOWN CALENDAR 



— Every Monday of each month, 7:30 p.m., 
Town Hall, 259-8850. 

— First Monday of each month, 8:00 p.m., 
Superintendent's Office, 259-9400. 

For appointments, call Town Hall, 
259-8850. 

— Meetings by appointment. 

— Meetings by appointment; call Dr. 
Gordon Donaldson, 259-8192. 

— Third Thursday of each month; call 
Town Hall, 259-8850. 

Second Wednesday of each month, 
8:00 p.m., Town Hall, 259-8850. 

— 4,463 (1965 Census) 
14.56 square miles 

— $37.50 per $1,000 valuation 

First Monday in March after the fif- 
teenth - March 17, 1969 



Saturday following Town Meeting 
March 22, 1969 



Twelve months continuous residence in 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
prior to March 17, 1969, and six 
months continuous residence in the 
Town of Lincoln prior to March 17, 1969 

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 
5 P. M. Closed on Saturdays. 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Russell L. Haden, Jr. , Chairman 
Elliott V. Grabill 
Harold E. Lawson 



We would like to begin this review of 1968 with two over-all 
observations. One is the philosophy of operation of the Board 
of Selectmen. We desire to capitalize on the level of intelli- 
gence of Lincoln residents and to foster every possible involvement 
by individual citizens in the municipal decision-making process. 
Consequently, we do not see it as the function of the Board to 
make decisions that have far-reaching effects without consultation 
by the town in Town Meetings. The Board investigates, sharpens 
the alternatives, and recommends for the town to decide. Obvious- 
ly, interim decisions sometimes must be made under pressure of 
time and outside agencies, but this should occur rarely. 

Secondly, we would like to draw to the attention of everyone 
the impact that inflation is beginning to make on municipal sala- 
ries. This is a trend that is accelerating rapidly now. Lin- 
coln is not large enough to affect this one way or another, but 
must expect to adjust to the trend. We have been doing so in- 
formally by following the average of the four contiguous towns 
closest to Lincoln's size. At the 1969 Town Meeting, the Finance 
Committee will present a new Bylaw calling for the creation of a 
formal Personnel Board. The Selectmen endorse this approach. 

The South Great Road construction project from the 117/126 
intersection to Lincoln Road, mentioned last year in this report, 
has been postponed to 1969. It will include a bicycle path along 
its route, and a connection is proposed from the intersection of 
117 and Lincoln Road to the present end of the path at Davis'. 

There were some equipment problems at the Sanitary Landfill 
because this is a rough service for any machine. Construction of 
a shed in December to house the bulldozer will be of great assist- 



ance in improving its maintenance. The Landfill in other res- 
pects seems to be a great improvement over the old "dump". 

The location of Route 2 has been fixed on the northern route, 
touching the National Park. Final engineering to complete the 
details is now under way and the official announcement on the 
route will be made when the DPW is ready to proceed with land pro- 
curement. 

House breaks still plague us and the surrounding towns. We 
remind you urgently that our Police Department wants you to call 
in whenever you see something suspicious, being sure to give li- 
cense numbers. If we develop a record of certain licenses or in- 
dividuals being regularly in suspicious situations, we can be in 
a position to take preventive action. 

The state took over the operation of our Welfare Department 
on July 1st. Personnel from the Bedford office continue, how- 
ever, to handle Lincoln cases, to our satisfaction. However, the 
State is using funds for this purpose that formerly were returned 
to the Towns , and the net effect is reduced income for Lincoln. 

The hard-working Recreation Committee developed a plan for 
swimming, since there was no improvement in the water supply to 
Walden Pond. An aboveground pool was purchased and operated for 
one month. Because of the good acceptance by users of this solu- 
tion, its use will be expanded to two months during 1969. 

Mosquito control was rejected by the town in a Town Meeting, 
despite the wet spring. Action for the near future will be up to 
individual citizens, a number having already bought the electronic 
devices recommended. 

The purchase price of the DiPerna land, authorized by the 
town in 1964, was challenged in the Courts, and a negotiated set- 
tlement approved by the town at a special Town Meeting. Access 
to this land was considered and study continued. Limited access 
by foot, horse and bicycle over the former O'Brien land is hoped 
for in early 1969. 

Action developed in three major studies: Moderate Income 
Housing, Industrial Rezoning, and Regional High School Committee 
Composition (with Sudbury). 

The Moderate Income Housing Committee under Chairman Huson 



Jackson reported to the town with their data and suggested a new 
committee to begin developing specific steps to crystalize their 
recommendations. Such a new committee was created with Fred 
Greene as chairman, subsequently metamorphosed into a non-profit 
corporation with broad participation from the town. Action is 
aimed first at making use of some 10 to 20 of the houses being 
displaced by the National Park. Second are the legal, financial, 
and administrative procedures to bring into being the 150 housing 
units recommended, leading to the presentation of such a complete 
plan to the town. 

The Planning Board Committee on industrial rezoning under 
Bob Baldwin made a thorough investigation of what might be done 
now. Their conclusion was that Lincoln should rezone the tri- 
angle between Bedford, Hanscom and the National Park for research 
or office use. Action steps are being prepared by the Planning 
Board. 

After many meetings, the Regional Study Committee under 
Elliott Grabill recommended that Lincoln agree to increasing the 
number of Sudbury members from 3 to 5 in order to reflect more 
fairly the difference between the populations of the two towns. 

The Selectmen endorse the three conclusions listed above. 

Lincoln has been blessed in having active, dedicated citizens 
working on its behalf. In this tradition have been Jerry Kelli- 
her, who retired in 1954, and Elizabeth Causer (who retired in 
1967 and passed away in November, 1968). Now William H. (Bill) 
Davis, Town Clerk for 36 years and Tax Collector for 30 as well, 
has retired effective December 31, 1968. His was yeoman ser- 
vice in the finest tradition of personal government and the town 
is greatly in debt to him. 

It is with special personal emphasis that Selectmen Lawson 
and Haden draw to the attention of the Town that Elliott Grabill 
retires this March after 13 years and over 4 full terms of office 
as Selectman and Chairman of the Board. We who have worked with 
him so closely can appreciate more than others the tremendous 
time and love that Elliott gave to the town. No one has been 
more selfless in such a volunteer capacity. His service will 
only truly become apparent in the large void the Town will feel by 
his retirement. We will call on him often for his continued ad- 
vice. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Term Expires 
MODERATOR 

Kenneth W. Bergen 1969 

TOWN CLERK 

William H. Davis 1969 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Russell L. Haden, Jr., Chairman 1970 

Elliott V. Grabill 1969 

Harold E. Lawson 1971 

TOWN TREASURER 

Frederick B. Taylor 1969 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 1969 

Frank R. Stevens 1970 

Robert L. Sutherland 1971 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Frederick B. Taylor 1971 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 1969 

John R. White 1970 

John B. French 1971 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Alan McClennen, Chairman 1971 

Stuart B. Avery 1969 

John B. Larson 1970 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D., Chairman 1970 

Abigail Avery 1969 

Herbert A. Haessler, M. D. 1971 

REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Henry Morgan, Chairman 1970 

Ellen DeN. Cannon 1969 

Frederick P. Walkey 1971 



Term Expires 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Robert A. S pence, Chairman 
H. Arnold MacLean 
James DeNormandie 



1969 
1970 
1971 



PLANNING BOARD 



Robert L. Allen, Chairman 
Morton B . Braun 
Richard C. Reece 
David M. Donaldson 
Susan M. Brooks 



1971 
1969 
1970 
1972 
1973 



David L. Garrison 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



1969 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



William T. King 
Clement C. Sawtell 
Richard F. Schroeder 



1969 
1970 
1971 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 



Thomas Winship, Chairman 
Paul Brooks 
Elizabeth Harney 



1970 
1969 
1971 



TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



Edwin M. Cole 
Morley M. John 
Martha DeNormandie 



Life Trustee 
Life Trustee 
Life Trustee 



John A. Carley (School Committee Appointee) 
Francis H. Gleason (Selectmen Appointee) 
Albert L. Fullerton (Elected by the Town) 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



Francis Andrews 
Sumner Smith 
Richard B. Bailey 
Victor A. Lutnicki 



A Directors 



B Directors 



Hamilton R. James (Resigned - Selectmen Appointee) 

Robert B. Newman (Selectmen Appointee) 

Janet B. Daniels (School Committee Appointee) 

Stanley Heck (Library Trustees Appointee) 



1970 
1969 
1971 



1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 

1969 
1969 
1971 
19 70 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Warren F. Flint 



Lois McClure Light 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



CLERK OF SELECTMEN 



Elizabeth J. Snelling 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WELFARE 



Leo A. Jeghelian 



Frank J. Cande 



Leo J . Algeo 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE 



Daniel A. Maclnnis , Jr 
Michael McHugh 



Lawrence P. Hallett 
Richard J. Hallett 
Charles E. Doyle 
Raymond P. Maher 
David Davis 
John J. Fitzgerald 



Leo J. Algeo 
Lawrence P. Hallett 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 



POLICE SERGEANT 



POLICE OFFICERS 



CONSTABLES 



FIRE CHIEF 



Term Expires 
1969 

1969 

1969 

1969 

1969 

1969 

1969 

1969 



1969 
1969 
1969 
1969 
1969 
1969 



Leo J. Algeo 



1969 
1969 
1969 



1969 



Term Expires 



DOG OFFICERS 



Leo J. Algeo 1969 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1969 

Daniel A. Maclnnis , Jr. 1969 

PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 
Thomas W. Coan 1969 

FOREST WARDEN 
Leo J. Algeo 1969 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Ernest L. Johnson 1969 

WIRING INSPECTOR 
William M. Dean 1969 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Daniel J. Murphy 1969 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Alans on H. Sturgis, Jr. 1969 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1969 

ASSISTANT DIRECTORS OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Eveleth R. Todd 1969 

Ernest L. Johnson 1969 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 
Delbar P. Keily 1969 

FENCE VIEWERS 
Perry Culver 1969 

Charles H. Stevens 1969 

VETERANS' AGENT 
William B. Whalen 1969 

VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 
William B. Whalen 1969 



Term Expires 



TOWN COUNSEL 



William N. Swift 1969 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret Flint 1969 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 1969 

Manley B. Boyce 1970 

Nancy Hall 1971 

William H. Davis, ex officio 1969 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 1971 

John Quincy Adams 1970 

Paul Brooks 1969 

James DeNormandie 1970 

Edith M. Henderson 1969 

Walter Van Dorn (Resigned) 1969 

John B. Niles (Appointed) 1969 

Hans Van Leer 1969 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

John P. Stevenson, Co-Chairman 1970 

Mary Jane Butler, Co-Chairman (Resigned) 1970 

Barbara B. Leggatt 1971 

Walter I. Keyes 1971 

Gwendolyn G. desCognets 1971 

Mary Hester 1971 

George C. Hibben 1970 

Donna G. Burt 1969 

Myrna G. Ehrenfeld 1969 

Rhoda K. Taschioglou 1969 

NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Katharines. White (Appointee of Selectmen) 1969 

James DeNormandie (Appointee of Governor) 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 1971 

James Jagger 1969 

Hans Van Leer 1970 

Robert D. Gordon 1972 

J. Lewis Cunningham 1973 



Term Expires 

1969 
1970 



1969 
1970 
1971 
1971 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS, BOARD OF APPEALS 
Robert W. Jevon 
John C. Hutchins 

BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 
Lawrence B. Anderson, Chairman 
Stanley Porter 
Stephen W. Herthel 
Walter Belanger, Associate Member 

CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Henry J. Rugo, Chairman 1970 

Frederick P. Walkey 1970 

Margaret Flint 1969 

Joyce Winship (Resigned) 1969 

Joseph Campobasso, ex officio, American Legion 1969 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 
Henry Spencer 1969 

REPRESENTATIVE TO COMMUNITY SERVICE BOARD 
Nancy Gordon 1969 

REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 
Robert L. Allen 1971 

MOSQUITO CONTROL STUDY COMMITTEE 

David L. Garrison, Chairman 1969 

Elaine Boyer 1969 

Richard E. Lang 1969 

Vernon Turner 1969 



AIRPORT COMMUNITY COUNCIL 



Frederick J. Eppling 
Gregory Kolligian 



REGIONAL AGREEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



John B. French 
Elliott V. Grabill 
James Jagger 



1969 
1969 



1969 
1969 
1969 



SPECIAL POLICE 



Robert H. Booth 

Joseph Bozak 

Floriy Campobasso 

Joseph Campobasso 

Frank J. Cande 

Vincenzo Cassela 

Edward C. Chisholm 

Claire Ciraso (traffic) 

John F. Cook 

Lorraine Dean (matron) 

William M. Dean 

James DeNormandie 

William R. Doherty 

Lloyd A. Douty 

Hazel Fedock (matron) 

Warren F. Flint 

Mary J. Gilbert (matron) 

Elliott V. Grabill 

Russell L. Haden, Jr. 



Lawrence P. Hallett 

Ernest L. Johnson 

William T. King 

Harry B. Knowles , Jr. 

Harry B. Knowles, III 

Karl F. Lahnstein 

Harold E. Laws on 

Paul V. Moynihan 

Mary Murphy (matron) 

Virginia Murphy (traffic) 

Ronald R. Reichard 

E . Donlan Rooney 

D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 

Carl Smith 

Sumner Smith 

Alans on H. Sturgis, Jr. 

Henry Warner 

William B. Whalen 



Name 



JURY LIST, 1968 
Address 



Occupation 



William R. Barker 
Roger B . Bond 
Robert H. Booth 
Herbert N. Chellis 
Jennie Ciraso 
Thomas W. Coan 
Arthur L. Cob urn, III 
Robert P. Condit 
Richard D. Coons 
Wendell A. Dean 
Davis R. Dewey, II 
Leeone E. Durnan 
William G. Elliott 
A. Bradlee Emmons 
James J . Faran 
George H. Fernald 
James T. Foust 
Robert M. Fraser 



Old Bedford Road 
Ridge Road 
Old Concord Road 
Concord Turnpike 
Mackintosh Lane 
Lincoln Road 
Laurel Drive 
Concord Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Partridge Lane 
Old Winter Street 
Lexington Road 
Baker Bridge Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Tabor Hill Road 
Todd Pond 
Round Hill Road 
Bedford Road 



Advertising 

Architect 

Investment Mgt. 

Electrician 

Technician 

Electrician 

C. P. A. 

Manufacturer 

Executive 

Retired 

Consultant 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Publisher 

Electronics Eng. 

Engineer 

Engineer 

Project Engineer 



10 



Name 



Address 



Occupation 



Albert Fullerton, Jr 
Jeanne C. Healey 
George C. Hibben 
Michael C. Horn 
Jerome C. Hunsaker 
James A. Hutchinson, 
Robert W. Jevon 
Cyrus H. Kano 
Walter I. Keyes 
William T. King 
Robert A. Lemire 
Gerald J. Mahoney 
Edwin A. Mason 
Ralph E. Maxwell 
William J. McCune 
Ronald B. McKinney 
Thomas Mix 
Donald J. Natoli 
Robert L. Niles 
Stanley W. Page 
Richard B. Paige 
Charles E. Pierce 
Edward B. Raws on 
Patricia M. Regan 
Ruth R. Rich 
George L. Roehr 
Ralph J. A. Ruocco 
Millicent Seaver 
Virginia Spangle 
Robert A. Spence 
Ruth Stewart 
David F. Sykes 
Dorothy A. Thompson 
George B. Thompson, Jr 
Eveleth R. Todd 
Paul Travers 
James A. Turner 
R. Karl Van Leer 
Joseph A. Vitale 
George Wells 
Robert M. Wood 
Lawrence W. Zuelke 



Blueberry Lane 
Weston Road 
Concord Turnpike 
Lincoln Road 
Weston Road 
Jr. Lincoln Road 
Trapelo Road 
Lincoln Road 
Lexington Road 
Old Concord Road 
Codman Road 
Juniper Ridge 
South Great Road 
Deerhaven 
Old Concord Road 
Ridge Road 
Old Winter Street 
Morningside Lane 
Blueberry Lane 
South Great Road 
Trapelo Road 
Lincoln Road 
Moccasin Hill 
Ridge Road 
Conant Road 
Todd Pond 
Old Bedford Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Tower Road 
Hillside Road 
Deerhaven 
Old County Road 
Conant Road 
Oxbow Road 
Lincoln Road 
Old County Road 
Acorn Lane 
Conant Road 
Silver Birch Lane 
Baker Bridge Road 
Deerhaven 
Old Sudbury Road 



Electronic Eng. 

Housewife 

Manufacturer 

Executive 

Investments 

Salesman 

Engineer 

Mechanical Eng. 

Engineer 

Inv. Counselor 

Stock Broker 

Pharmacist 

Wildlife Mgt. 

General Manager 

Asst. Gen. Mgr. 

Analyst 

Auto Business 

Ind. Consultant 

Advertising 

Insurance 

Appraiser 

Banking 

Physicist 

Editor 

Housewife 

Mechanical Eng. 

Sales Rep. 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Prof. Engineer 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Florist 

Trustee 

Electrical Eng. 

Engineer 

Vice President 

Engineer 

Executive 

Executive 

Landscape Arch. 



11 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 



Robert L. Filbin, ex officio 



Term Expires 



Ann E. Paddock 1969 

APPOINTED BY THE TAX COLLECTOR 

DEPUTY TAX COLLECTOR 
Ann E. Paddock 1969 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

COMMUNITY NURSE 
Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 1969 

BURIAL AGENT 
William H. Davis 1969 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Lawrence P. Hallett 1969 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND MODERATOR 



TOWN BUILDING COMMITTEE 




John Pike, Chairman 


1972 


Guilbert S. Winchell 


1969 


Alice McKennan 


1971 


Gregory Kolligian 


1970 


George Hibben 


1972 


SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 




Charles W. Calkins, Jr. 


1970 


Sylvia B. Neumann 


1969 


John B. Garrison 


1971 



12 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN AND PLANNING BOARD 
MODERATE INCOME HOUSING ACTION COMMITTEE 



Joseph Bower 

Robert Brownell 

Florence Caras 

James DeNormandie 

Robert Gargill 

George Fernald 

Huson Jackson 

Charles Kindleberger 

Robert Leaver 

Barbara Leaver 

Thomas Leggat 

Mary McNulty 

Henry Morgan 

Guido Perera 

Jean W. Preston 

William Preston 

Susan Shapiro 

Daniel Spaeth 

T. Langdon Wales 

Enid Winchell 

George Wells 

Frederick H. Greene, Jr. , Chairman 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Kemon Taschioglou, Chairman 1969 

Leo A. Palmer 1970 

Walter Salmon 1969 

William Williams, Jr. 1971 

Arthur E. Thiessen 1971 

LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 
James E. Duffy, III 1969 

Henry W. Spencer 1971 

REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL COMMITTEE 
Robert L. Allen 
James T. Foust 
John B. Niles 

13 



TOWN CLERK 

William H. Davis 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. His duties in- 
clude recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, 
and notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appro- 
priations which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept at the 
Town Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the 
Town should communicate with the Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 18, 1968 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, at 7:30 P. M. The 
return of the Warrant was read. The Moderator then called atten- 
tion to Article 1 (Election of Officers) , and, a quorum being 
present, the following business was transacted. 

Article 2 . To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers required by law to be 
elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED : That David L. Garrison be elected Measurer of 
Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Article 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town Offi- 
cers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED : That the reports of the Town Officers, Com- 
missioners, Committees and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, 
be accepted. 

Article 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any 
Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 
additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 
compensation of such members. 

VOTED : That the salaries of the elected officials of 
the Town for the current year be fixed at the following amounts: 

14 



Selectmen, each $ 100.00 

Treasurer and Collector 700.00 
Town Clerk 1,000.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 
Assessors, other members, 

each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

Article 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the neces- 

sary and expedient purposes of the Town or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town adopt as separate appropriations 

the listed recommendations in the schedule attached to the Report 
of the Finance Committee, printed on pages 5 through 10, inclusive, 
of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1968 Annual Town 
Meeting, and that all items be raised by taxation except to the 
following extent: 

Item 15 - $1,050.00 to be taken from Water 
Department Surplus; Item 30 - $525.00 to be taken from Water De- 
partment Surplus; Items 320 and 321 - $17,250.00 to be taken from 
Free Cash and returned to Free Cash when received; Item 504 - 
$1,014.78 to be taken from DeCordova School Equipment Fund and 
$52.96 from the Grammar School Fund and $32,861.93 to be taken 
from School Aid Chapters 864 and 874; Item 520 - $800.00 to be 
taken from Dog Tax Receipts; Item 521 - $1,403.25 to be taken 
from State Aid to Libraries and $400.00 to be taken from Accumula- 
ted Library Trust Funds; Item 702 - $500.00 to be taken from the 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund; Item 805 - $90,000 to be taken from 
Free Cash; Item 809 - $10,000.00 to be taken from Conservation Re- 
ceipts Reserve; Reserve Fund - $10,000.00 to be taken from Free 
Cash and $10,000 from Overlay Surplus. 

The total for General Purposes for 1968 is 
$2,101,500.83. After taking into consideration the use of spec- 

ial funds, as indicated above, the amount to be raised by taxa- 
tion is $1,925,642.91. 

Items 950 to 956, inclusive, totaling $96,500.00, 
shall be taken from Water Department funds, as listed on Page 10. 

Article 6 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 

authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning January 1, 1969, and to issue a 
note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 



15 



note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, 
in accordance with Section 17, Chapter AA, General Laws. 

VOTED : That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow money from time to time 
in anticipation of revenue of the financial year beginning January 
1, 1969, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable in one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year, in accordance with Section 17, Chapter AA, 
General Laws . 

Article 7 . To determine whether the Town will authorize 
the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to continue its 
annual contract with U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate 
the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachu- 
setts, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and the School Committee to continue its annual contract with U. S. 
Commissioner of Education to operate the elementary school at L. G. 
Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Article 8 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
acquire for conservation and recreation purposes, by eminent do- 
main, purchase, or any other way, from William M. Dean a certain 
parcel of land located northwesterly of Lincoln Road and easterly 
of Concord Road, containing 11.9 acres, more or less, being the 
same premises conveyed to said William M. Dean by deed of Edward 
R. Farrar, dated March 1, 19A7, and recorded with Middlesex South 
District Registry of Deeds, Book 7107, Page 38, and for such pur- 
poses to raise and appropriate a sum of money, and to determine 
whether to provide said sum by taxation, by transfer from availa- 
ble funds, by borrowing under the authority of General Laws, Chap- 
ter AA, Section 7, Clause (3), or by a combination of said methods, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be and they hereby are 
authorized and empowered in the name and on behalf of the Town to 
acquire in fee by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, for 
conservation and recreational purposes from William M. Dean a cer- 
tain parcel of land near Giles Road as hereinafter more fully des- 
cribed; that the sum of $27,000 be appropriated therefor and be 
taken from the Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote 
of the Town under Article 23 of the 1959 Annual Town Meeting; and 
that the Selectmen be and they hereby are authorized: 

1. To make application to the United States 
House and Home Finance Agency under Title VII of the Housing Act 
of 1961 for a grant to acquire open space land. 



16 






2. To make application to the Commissioner of 
Natural Resources for the Commonwealth under Section 11 of Chapter 
132A of the General Laws for reimbursement of the expenditures 
hereby authorized, any such reimbursement to be used as provided 
in said Section. 

3. To execute in the name and on behalf of 
the Town such other documents as may be necessary or desirable to 
carry out the provisions of this vote. 

Description 

Starting at a pipe at the Northwesterly corner 
of the farm now or formerly of Herbert G. Farrar on the Concord- 
Way land Road, said corner being thirty-three feet six inches (33 f 6") 
Northerly of the County bound; thence turning and running thirty- 
two feet (32') Northerly to a drill hole marking the Southwest 
corner of land now or formerly of Robert P. Condit; thence turning 
and running Easterly Four Hundred and forty-six feet (446') to a 
split stone bound at the Southeast corner of said Condit land; 
thence turning and running Northerly Seven Hundred twenty-eight and 
36/100 feet (728.36') by said Condit land and by land now or for- 
merly of Elizabeth F. Kargaard to a split stone bound on the brook; 
thence turning and running Easterly by the center of the brook One 
Hundred fifty- two feet (152') by land now or formerly of Edmund W. 
Giles; thence turning and running Easterly Three Hundred seventy- 
three and 50/100 feet (373.50'); thence turning and running South- 
easterly One Hundred fifty-nine and 30/100 feet (159.30*); thence 
turning and running Southeasterly Four Hundred forty-eight and 
50/100 feet (448.50') by land now or formerly of Stephen H. Blod- 
gett; thence turning and running South One Hundred eighty feet 
(180') by land now or formerly of Joseph S. Hart to a split stone 
bound at the edge of the brook; thence turning and running Wester- 
ly One Thousand Two Hundred eighty-nine feet (1,289'), more or 
less, by said Farrar land to the point of beginning on the Concord- 
Way land Road. Containing 12 acres more or less, together with 
all rights appurtenant to said land. 

Article 9 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
acquire for conservation and recreation purposes, by eminent do- 
main, purchase, or otherwise, any or all of the following parcels 
of land from the owners therein described; for such purpose to 
raise and appropriate a sum of money; and to determine whether to 
provide said sum by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing under the authority of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
7, Clause (3), or by a combination of said methods; or take any 



17 



other action relative thereto. 

(a) From Constantin A. and Olga M. Pertzoff 
two parcels situated westerly and northwesterly of Bedford Road 
and easterly of Sandy Pond, containing approximately 9 and 7 plus 
acres respectively, as shown shaded in pink on a "Plan of Land in 
Lincoln, Mass.", dated June 10, 1965, by Snelling, Hilton & Asso- 
ciates, which plan is presently on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk. 

(b) From Ann Monks Banks two parcels situated 
westerly and northwesterly of Bedford Road and easterly of Sandy 
Pond, containing approximately 23.1 and 19.3 acres respectively, 
as shown shaded in blue on a "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass.", 
dated June 10, 1965, by Snelling, Hilton & Associates, which plan 
is presently on file in the office of the Town Clerk. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be and they hereby are auth- 
orized and empowered in the name and on behalf of the Town to 
acquire in fee by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, for 
conservation and recreational purposes from Constantin A. and Olga 
M. Pertzoff two parcels of land situated westerly and northwester- 
ly of Bedford Road and easterly of Sandy Pond containing approxi- 
mately 9 acres and 7 plus acres respectively, as hereinafter more 
fully described, and from Ann Monks Banks two parcels of land 
westerly and northwesterly of Bedford Road and easterly of Sandy 
Pond containing approximately 23.1 acres and 19.3 acres respect- 
ively, all as hereinafter more fully described; that the sum of 
$160,000 be raised and appropriated therefor; that to meet said 
appropriation the sum of $2,000 be raised by taxation, the sum of 
$3,000 be taken from the Stabilization Fund established pursuant 
to the vote of the Town under Article 23 of the 1959 Annual Town 
Meeting; and that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, be and hereby is authorized to borrow the sum of $155,000 
under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3) of the 
General Laws, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, 
payable in accordance with said Chapter 44, so that the whole loan 
will be paid in not more than twenty years from the date of the 
issue of the first bond or note; and that the Selectmen be and 
they hereby are authorized: 

1. To make application to the United States 
House and Home Finance Agency under Title VII of the Housing Act 
of 1961 for a grant to acquire open space land. 

2. To make application to the Commissioner 
of Natural Resources for the Commonwealth under Section 11 of 
Chapter 132A of the General Laws for reimbursement of the expendi- 
tures hereby authorized, any such reimbursement to be used as pro- 



18 



vided in said Section. 

3. To execute in the name and on behalf of the 
Town such other documents as may be necessary or desirable to carry 
out the provisions of this vote. 

DESCRIPTIONS 



Pertzoff No. 1 

PARCEL IV 

Beginning at a concrete bound at land of Ann Monks Banks, 
thence running South 35 50 '40" East by said land Four Hundred Sev- 
enty-four and 43/100 (474.43) feet to a concrete bound at land of 
Constantin A. and Olga Pertzoff; thence continuing South 35 50' 40" 
East by said Pertzoff land approximately One Hundred Thirty (130) 
feet to a point on the 250' contour line; thence turning and run- 
ning Westerly and Northwesterly by said Pertzoff land along said 
contour line to a point of land of said Ann Monks Banks which 
point is approximately Thirty (30) feet North 88°46'00" East of a 
concrete bound; thence turning and running North 88 46' 00" East by 
said Banks land Eight Hundred and Eighty-one and 04/100 (881.04) 
feet more or less to the concrete bound at the point of beginning. 
Containing 8.9 acres more or less. 

Pertzoff No. 2 

PARCEL II 



Beginning at a concrete bound at land of Constantin A. and 
Olga Pertzoff and Ann Monks Banks, thence running South 35 50' 40" 
East by land of Pertzoff One Hundred Sixty (160) feet more or less 
to a point at the 250' contour line; thence turning and running 
Southeasterly along said 250' contour line to land of Banks; thence 
turning and running North 16 35' 30" East by said land of Banks One 
Thousand Two Hundred Seventy-six and 83/100 (1276.83) feet to a 
concrete bound; thence turning and running North 80 29' 10" East by 
said land of Banks, Four Hundred Eighty-one and 04/100 (481.04) 
feet to a drill hole in the ledge at land now or formerly of Albert 
S. and Noelle W. Paine; thence turning and running by said land of 
Paine by two courses being North 28 11' East, Twenty-eight and 
33/100 (28.33) feet; and North 18°25'30" East, One Hundred One and 
03/100 (101.03) feet respectively to the Old Road; thence turning 
and running North 82 26' West by said road, One Hundred Nine and 
56/100 (109.56) feet to a point; thence continuing Northwesterly 
by said road Fifty- three and 85/100 (53.85) feet to land of Ann 

19 



Monks Banks; thence turning and running South 18 25 f 30" West, 
Thirty and 06/100 (30.06) feet to a concrete bound; thence turning 
and running South 80 29' 10" West, Four Hundred Forty-nine and 
66/100 (449.66) feet by land of said Banks to a concrete bound; 
thence turning and running South 16 35 '30" West by said land of 
Banks, Nine Hundred Sixty (960) feet to a concrete bound; thence 
turning and running South 57 24' 50" East, Four Hundred Fifteen and 
79/100 (415.79) feet by said land of Banks to a concrete bound at 
the point of beginning. Containing 6.8 acres more or less. 

Banks No. 1 

Beginning at a concrete bound at land of Constantin A. and 
Olga Pertzoff, thence running North 57 24 '50" East by said Pertzoff 
land Four Hundred Fifteen and 79/100 (415.79) feet to a concrete 
bound on the 300' contour line; thence turning and running North 
16°35*30" East by said Pertzoff land Nine Hundred Sixty (960) feet 
to a concrete bound; thence turning and running North 80 29' 10" 
East by said Pertzoff land, Four Hundred Forty-nine and 66/100 
(449.66) feet to a concrete bound; thence turning and running 
North 18°25'30" East by said Pertzoff land Thirty and 06/100 (30.06) 
feet to the Old Road; thence turning and running North 83 54' 40" 
West by said road Fifty (50) feet to an iron pipe; thence turning 
and running South 80 29 '10" West by land now or formerly of Tarbell, 
Eight Hundred Ninety- two and 84/100 (892.84) feet to a point; 
thence turning and running South 7 00' 00" West by said land of Tar- 
bell, One Hundred Ninety-eight (.198) feet to a stone bound; thence 
turning and running Southerly by said land of Tarbell by seven 
courses and distances: namely, South 80 49 'West, One Hundred Forty- 
seven and 18/100 (i47.18) feet; South 79 49' West, One Hundred Twen- 
ty-one and 44/100 (121.44) feet; South 83°49 ' West, Two Hundred 
Five and 26/100 (205.26) feet; South 85°49' West, One Hundred Eighty 
one and 50/100 (181.50) feet; North 87°01' West, Three Hundred For- 
ty-two (342) feet more or less to Sandy Pond; thence turning and 
running Southwesterly by said pond, approximately Five Hundred Six- 
ty (560) feet to a point Sixty (60) feet South 88°46'00" West to a 
concrete bound; thence turning and running North 88 46 '00" East by 
land of Pertzoff Nine Hundred Eleven and 04/100 (911.04) feet to a 
concrete bound; thence turning and running South 35 50 '40" East by 
said land of Pertzoff Four Hundred Seventy-four and 43/100 (474.43) 
feet to the point of beginning. Containing 23.1 acres more or 
less . 



20 



Banks No. 2 

Beginning at a point at land of Constantin A. and Olga Pert- 
zoff at the 250' contour line approximately Five Hundred Seventy- 
five (575) feet Southwesterly of a cross cut in a stone bound, 
thence running North 16 35 '30" East through said cross cut in a 
stone bound, approximately One Thousand Two Hundred Fifty (1250) 
feet to a concrete bound at land of said Pertzoff; thence turning 
and running North 80°29'10" East by said land Four Hundred Eighty- 
one and 04/100 (481.04) feet to a drill hole in a ledge at land 
now or formerly of Albert S. and Noelle W. Paine; thence turning 
and running Southwesterly by said land Two Hundred Twelve (212) 
feet more or less to a stone wall; thence turning and running East- 
erly and Southeasterly by said land of Paine by two courses measur- 
ing Ninety (90) feet and Two Hundred Thirty- three (233) feet to 
the Old Road; thence turning and running Southeasterly by said Road 
Four Hundred Seventy-nine and 80/100 (479.80) feet to the junction 
of two stone walls at land now or formerly of Robert M. and Donna 
A. Fraser; thence turning and running Southwesterly by a wood road 
approximately One Hundred (100) feet to a point on the 250' contour 
line; thence turning and running Southwesterly by land of Ann Monks 
Banks along said 250' contour line approximately One Thousand Four 
Hundred Eighty (1480) feet to the point of beginning. Containing 
19.3 acres more or less. 

Article 10 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or otherwise, an access ease- 
ment for all purposes for which Town Ways are commonly used over a 
strip of land on the property of John H. O'Brien on Morningside.. 
Lane, said strip running from Morningside Lane to the Town property 
acquired from the Sandy Pond Trust and being the location of the 
Town's existing drain easement as shown on Plan No. 525 of 1953, 
recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds at the 
end of Book 8057, and for that purpose to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money therefor; and to construct an access road over said 
easement and over adjacent land of the Town, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That no action be taken under Article 10. 

Article 11 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
accept as a Town Way Bedford Lane from Bedford Road to the pro- 
posed Route 2 crossing, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Bed- 
ford Lane as ordered by the Board of Selectmen, Lincoln, Mass.", 
dated February, 1968, by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, presently on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk; for that purpose to determine 
whether the Town will vote to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, 



21 



or otherwise, the land contained therein; and to determine whether 
the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money therefor; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town accept as a Town Way Bedford Lane 
from Bedford Road to the proposed Route 2 crossing as shown on a 
plan entitled "Plan of Bedford Lane as ordered by the Board of Se- 
lectmen, Lincoln, Massachusetts", dated February 1968 by Cleverdon, 
Varney & Pike to be recorded with Middlesex South District Registry 
of Deeds; and that for this purpose the Board of Selectmen are here- 
by authorized to acquire by eminent domain, purchase or otherwise 
the land therein contained and to accept confirmatory deeds there- 
for. 

Article 12 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
accept as a Town Way a relocation and widening of Bedford Road from 
the southerly end of the prior relocation of said Road, as shown on 
a plan entitled "Relocation of Bedford Road", recorded in Middlesex 
South District Registry of Deeds, Book 9782, Page 428, to Sandy 
Pond Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Bedford Road as 
ordered by the Board of Selectmen, Lincoln, Mass.", dated February, 
1968, by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, presently on file in the office 
of the Town Clerk; for that purpose to determine whether the Town 
will vote to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or otherwise, the 
land contained therein; and to determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate a sum of money therefor; or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : The motion was defeated, but a substitute vote 
was passed unanimously, as follows: 

VOTED : That the Town accept as a Town Way a portion of 
a relocation of Bedford Road as shown on Sheet #1 of a "Plan of Bed- 
ford Road as ordered by the Board of Selectmen, Lincoln, Massachu- 
setts", dated February 1968 by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike to be re- 
corded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds , from a drill 
hole in the face of the wall at the Southwesterly corner of land nov 
or formerly of Jenney, Charles J. and Katrina C, as shown on said 
Sheet #1 of said Plan, to a bound Southwesterly of the match line a, 
shown on said Sheet #1 of said Plan; and that for this purpose the 
Board of Selectmen are hereby authorized to acquire by eminent do- 
main, purchase, or otherwise, the land therein contained, together 
with all rights appurtenant to said land and to accept confirmatory 
deeds therefor. 

Article 13 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
accept a gift of land, to be conveyed in fee, from Paul Brooks, sai 
land containing approximately 3.1 acres, being located on the north- 
erly side of Conant Road and being shown on Plan No. 357 of 1960, 
recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, Book 9564 
Page 394, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town accept with thanks from Paul Brook; 

22 



a parcel of land in Lincoln, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in the 
rear of land now or formerly of Walla ch, being shown on a plan en- 
titled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. Dec. 1959, Rowland H. Barnes 
& Co., Civil Engineers", recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds Book 9564, Page 394, and being more particularly bounded and 
described as follows: SOUTHWESTERLY in a large part by the center 
line of a brook and all by land now or formerly of Wallach by three 
(3) courses and distances as shown on said plan, one hundred seven- 
ty-three and 65/100 (173.65) feet, eighty-three and 00/100 (83.00) 
feet and two hundred three and 54/100 (203.54) feet; NORTHWESTERLY 
for the most part by a stone wall and all by land now or formerly 
of Butts, two hundred fifty-one and 67/100 (251.67) feet; NORTHEAST- 
ERLY by land now or formerly of Paul Brooks by a barbed wire fence, 
five hundred thirty-nine and 54/100 (539.54) feet; SOUTHEASTERLY by 
a stone wall by land now or formerly of Lincoln Land Conservation 
Trust, one hundred thirty-two and 82/100 (132.82) feet; SOUTHEASTER- 
LY in part by a stone wall, in part by said land of Lincoln Land 
Conservation Trust and in part by land now or formerly of the Town 
of Lincoln, thirty-five and 00/100 (35.00) feet; SOUTHEASTERLY again 
by the center line of a ditch by said land of the Town of Lincoln, 
one hundred thirty- three (133) feet more or less to the intersection 
of the center line of a brook and the center line of said ditch; 
and SOUTHEASTERLY again by land of owners unknown, sixty-three and 
00/100 (63.00) feet. Containing 3.10 acres more or less accord- 
ing to said plan. 

Subject to the following restrictions: (a) No right 
of way or other easement over the remaining land of Paul Brooks is 
granted or to be implied by necessity or otherwise from this convey- 
ance, (b) A restriction for the benefit of the remaining and ad- 
joining land of said Paul Brooks and to which the Town by the accep- 
tance of this gift covenants and agrees that in perpetuity, but in 
any event until January 1, 2068, the premises shall be used solely 
for walking, horseback riding and other similar recreational activi- 
ties compatible with the preservation of the premises in their natu- 
ral state and free from debris and litter, including the right to 
create and maintain such naturally surfaced paths as are incidental 
to the above described recreational activities, but specifically ex- 
cluding hunting, shooting, fireworks, advertising, the use of motor 
or machine (except such as may be reasonably necessary for the 
maintenance of the premises in conformity to this restriction) , 
fires, buildings, structures and all manufacturing, mercantile and 
commercial activities . 

The above action was greeted with prolonged applause. 

Article 14. To determine whether the Town will vote to 



23 



accept a gift of land, to be conveyed in fee, from Louise M. Butts, 
said land containing 2 acres, more or less, and being situated 
northerly of Conant Road, or take any other action relative thereto.! 

VOTED : That the Town accept with thanks from Louise M. 
Butts a certain parcel of land situated Northerly of Conant Road 
and being described as follows: 

Commencing at a concrete bound at a stone wall 
at land of McClennen, thence running South 61 41' 20" East sixty-six 
and 44/100 (66.44) feet to a drill hole in said stone wall; thence 
turning and running South 35°40'10" East Forty-six and 23/100 
(46.23) feet to a drill hole in said stone wall; thence turning 
and running South 34°35 , 50" East Two Hundred Sixty-five and 04/100 
(265.04) feet to a point at land now or formerly of Brooks; thence 
turning and running South 38°42 f 50" West Two Hundred Thirty-five 
and 67/100 (235.67) feet partially along a stone wall to a point at 
other land of said Louise M. Butts; thence turning and running 
North 60°15 , 44" West Three Hundred Ten and 32/100 (310.32) feet to 
a point at land now or formerly of Browning; thence turning and run- 
ning North 29°38 f 00 M East Ninety-four and 67/100 (94.67) feet to a 
concrete bound; thence turning and running North 29 43' 10" East Two 
Hundred Seventy and 49/100 (270.49) feet to the point of beginning, 
said last two courses and distances being by land now or formerly 
of Browning. Containing 2.395 acres more or less. 

Subject to the following restrictions: 
(a) No right of way or other easement over the remaining land of 
Louise M. Butts is granted or to be implied by necessity or other- 
wise from this conveyance. (b) A restriction for the benefit of 
the remaining and adjoining land of said Louise M. Butts and to 
which the Town by the acceptance of this gift covenants and agrees 
that in perpetuity, but in any event until January 1, 2068, the 
premises shall be used solely for walking, horseback riding and 
other similar recreational activities compatible with the preserva- 
tion of the premises in their natural state and free from debris 
and litter, including the right to create and maintain such natur- 
ally surfaced paths as are incidental to the above described recrea- 
tional activities, but specifically excluding hunting, shooting, 
fireworks, advertising, the use of motor or machine (except such as 
may be reasonably necessary for the maintenance of the premises in 
conformity to this restriction), fires, buildings, structures and 
all manufacturing, mercantile and commercial activities. 

The above action was greeted with prolonged 
applause. 



24 



Article 15 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to transfer the sum of $30,000.00, or some other sum, from the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town 
under Article 23 of the 1959 Annual Town Meeting to the Conserva- 
tion Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town under Arti- 
cle 13 of the 1961 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That no action be taken under this Arti- 

cle. 

At this point, it was voted to adjourn the meeting until 
7:30 P. M. on Tuesday, March 19, 1968. 

ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
March 19, 1968 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth 
W. Bergen, at 7:30 P. M., and the following business was trans- 
acted: 

Article 16 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to support the School Committee in its continuing plan to bring a 
limited number of children from underprivileged areas to the Lin- 
coln Schools for purposes of education at no expense to the Town 
of Lincoln, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town support the School Com- 

mittee in its continuing plan to bring a limited number of child- 
ren from underprivileged areas to the Lincoln Schools for purposes 
of education at no expense to the Town of Lincoln. 

Article 17 . To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the By-Laws of the Town by adding the following new Section to 
Article XI of said By-Laws, entitled "Miscellaneous", which new 
section shall be designated Section 9, and shall provide as fol- 
lows : 

Section 9. No person owning or keeping 
a dog shall allow it to run at large. Any dog not upon the land 
of its owner or keeper, or not under the immediate control of some 
person, or not otherwise suitably confined, shall be deemed to be 
at large. The Town Dog Officer or the Town Police may impound 
any dog found to be at large. Any person violating this By-Law 
shall pay a fine of not more than $10.00. In addition to such 
fine the owner or keeper of any dog found at large and impounded 
shall pay any boarding or other charges incurred by the Town in 



25 



connection therewith; or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : The motion was defeated. 

Article 18 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $20,000.00, or some other sum, for the 
purchase of a new fire engine, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of 

$20,000.00 for the purchase of a new fire engine, said sum to be 
taken from the Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote 
of the Town under Article 23 of the 1959 Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 19 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $12,000.00, or any other sum, for the 
purchase of equipment for the use of various Public Works De- 
partments, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town appropriate the sum of 

$12,000.00 for the purchase of equipment for the use of various 
Public Works Departments, said sum to be taken from the Stabiliza- 
tion Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town under Arti- 
cle 23 of the 1959 Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 20 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to enter into a contract with the Towns of 
Bedford, Acton and Carlisle admitting Lincoln as a new member town 
in the Nashoba Public Welfare District upon such terms and con- 
ditions as said Board shall determine, all in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 3 of Chapter 118B of the General Laws, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to enter into a contract with the Towns of Bedford, Acton 
and Carlisle admitting Lincoln as a new member town in the Nashoba 
Public Welfare District upon such terms and conditions as said 
Board shall determine, all in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 3 of Chapter 118B of the General Laws. 

Article 21 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,120.93 for the purpose of 
reimbursing the County of Middlesex for payment by the County of 
damages to several persons from whom land was taken on account of 
the relocation of South Great Road. 

VOTED ; That the Town raise and appropriate the 

sum of $2,120.93 for the purpose of reimbursing the County of Mid- 
dlesex for payment by the County of damages to several persons from 
whom land was taken on account of the relocation of South Great 
Road. 

26 



Article 22 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $47,000.00, or any other sum, for alter- 
ing, renovating, finishing and furnishing portions of the Library 
building to increase the usable space therein; authorize the bor- 
rowing of part or all of the amount so appropriated; authorize the 
Library Trustees to apply for a construction grant under the Feder- 
al Library Services and Construction Act of 1964, as amended, or 
under any other applicable law, whether State or Federal; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Trustees of the Lincoln Public 

Library be authorized to alter, renovate, finish and furnish por- 
tions of the Library building to increase the usable space therein; 
that the sum of $47,000.00 be raised and appropriated therefor; and 
that the Library Trustees be and hereby are authorized to apply for 
a construction grant under the Federal Library Services and Con- 
struction Act of 1964, as amended, or under any other applicable 
law, whether State or Federal. 

Article 23 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $25,000.00, or any other sum, 
to construct an addition to the building off Codman Road housing 
vehicles of the Town's public works department, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the 

sum of $25,000.00 to construct an addition to the building off Cod- 
man Road housing vehicles of the Town's public works department. 

Article 24 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $9,000.00, or any other sum, 
to be used by the Town Building Committee to study further the 
building needs of the Lincoln schools, and in connection therewith 
to hire consultants as deemed advisable, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town raise and appropriate the 

sum of $9,000.00 to be used by the Town Building Committee to 
study further the building needs of the Lincoln Schools, and in 
connection therewith to hire consultants as deemed advisable. 

Article 25 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $2,400.00, or any other sum, for the use 
of the Celebrations Committee established by vote of the Town on 
March 22, 1965, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town raise and appropriate the 

sum of $2,400 for the use of the Celebrations Committee established 
by vote of the Town on March 22, 1965, with $250 of said sum to be 
taken from the Donald Gordon Recreation Fund. 

27 



Article 26 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,000.00, or any other sum, 
and appoint a supervisory committee for mosquito abatement pur- 
poses, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : A motion that the sum of $4,000.00 be 

raised and appropriated for mosquito control purposes was defeated, 
but it was 

VOTED : That the sum of $500.00 be raised and 

appropriated for mosquito control purposes to be spent under the 
supervision of a committee of not more than five (5) persons ap- 
pointed by the Selectmen. 

At the conclusion of the Meeting, the following Resolution, 
presented by Mr. R. Langdon Wales, was unanimously adopted: 

For 44 years, well past the memory of all but a few present, 
Lincoln has enjoyed a unique amenity in Hartwell Farm, a vital and 
enjoyable institution of the present created with the materials 
and atmosphere of the past through the intelligence, sensitivity 
and direct physical efforts of Miss Marion Fitch and her late 
associate, Miss Jane Poor. On February 18, 1968, a fierce fire 
destroyed all but the facade of the original pre-Revolutionary 
building and some chimneys. This great loss to Miss Fitch 
leaves an empty spot in all of our lives . The memory of the 
warmth, hospitality and good eating will long remain with us, how- 
ever. 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that this Town Meeting extends to 
Miss Fitch the appreciation of Lincoln's citizens for the great 
contribution she and Miss Poor have made to the quality of life in 
Lincoln and the warmest sentiments for her continued happiness and 
welfare. 

It was voted to adjourn the Meeting at 12 o'clock midnight. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



28 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 23, 1968 



In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant, the Polls were 
declared open at 8 A. M. by Mr. Russell L. Haden, Jr., who, with 
the assistance of Mr. Elliott V. Grabill, acted as Warden through- 
out the day. Mrs. Thomas Coan and Mrs. Fred Wilfert were duly 
sworn as Ballot Clerks. The Polls were declared closed by Mr. 
Grabill at 7 o'clock P. M. The total vote of 1,233, resulted 
as follows : 



Town Clerk (1 year) 



Selectman (3 years) 



Collector of Taxes 
(3 years) 



Assessor (3 years) 



Treasurer (1 year) 



School Committee 
(3 years) 



William H. Davis 

Scattering 

B lanks 


1,180 

1 
52 


Harold E. Lawson 

Scattering 

B lanks 


1,018 

3 

212 


Frederick B. Taylor 
B lanks 


1,121 
112 


Robert L. Sutherland 

Scattering 

B lanks 


1,016 

1 

216 


Frederick B. Taylor 
B lanks 


1,110 
123 


Frederick T. Drew 
John B . French 
Scattering 
B lanks 


215 

932 

1 

85 



Regional District 
School Committee 
(3 years) 



Edward L. DeMont 
Frederick P. Walkey 
Blanks 



241 

916 

76 



Water Commissioner 
(3 years) 



Alan McClennen 
Blanks 



1,086 
147 



29 



Board of Health 
(3 years) 



George P . Faddoul 
Herbert A. Haessler 
B lanks 



531 
533 
169 



Cemetery Commissioner 
(3 years) 



James DeNormandie 
B lanks 



1,086 
147 



Planning Board (5 years) 


Robert H. Baldwin 


210 




Susan M. Brooks 


596 




Frederick H. Greene, Jr. 


403 




B lanks 


24 


Commissioner of Trust Funds 






(3 years) 


Richard F. Schroeder 


1,068 




B lanks 


165 


Trustee of Bemis Fund 






(3 years) 


Elizabeth Harney 


1,065 




Blanks 


168 


Director of DeCordova 






Museum 






(4 years) 


Victor A. Lutnicki 


1,047 




Scattering 


2 




B lanks 


184 


Library Trustee (3 years) 


Albert L. Fullerton 


667 




Thomas F. McNulty 


174 




Philip W. Meriam 


322 




Blanks 


70 



Question: "Shall the Town pay one half the premium costs pay- 
able by retired employees for group life insurance 
and for group general or blanket hospital, surgical 
and medical insurance?" 



Yes 

No 

B lanks 



911 
217 
105 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



30 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
April 30, 1968 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were opened at 
7 o'clock A. M. for the bringing in of votes to the Primary Offi- 
cers for the election of candidates of political parties for the 
following offices. The Polls were declared open by the Warden, 

Mr. Richard J. Eaton, who was assisted in the duties of Warden by 
Mr. D. Everett Sherman, Jr. and Mr. John B. Garrison. The Polls 

were declared closed at 7 o'clock P.M. The total number of 

votes cast were as follows: Democratic: 617; Republican: 508. 

DEMOCRATIC 



Presidential Preference 



Eugene J. McCarthy 
Robert F. Kennedy 
Hubert H. Humphrey 
Lyndon B. Johnson 
Scattering 



497 

52 

48 

3 

17 



Delegate Group, 3rd District 



Joseph G. Bradley 
Paul C. Counihan 



281 
323 



Alternate Delegates 



Richard E. Landry 
Charles Ohanian 



270 
188 



Delegates Not Grouped 



Richard Robert Caples 
Scattering 



149 
3 



Alternate Delegates 
Not Grouped 



Dolores L. Mitchell 



181 



State Committee Man 

(5th Middlesex District) 



Paul C. Menton 
Philip S. Iuliano 



289 
48 



State Committee Woman 

(5th Middlesex District) 



Dolores L. Mitchell 
Elizabeth L. Codyer 
Louise J. Meehan 



248 
65 
31 



Democratic Town Committee 



Thomas B . Adams 
Henry M. Morgan 
Alvin Levin 
William G. Lang ton 



178 
169 
166 
162 



31 



Democratic Town Committee 

(Continued) Anne P. Priest 162 

Patricia Horwitz 160 

Peggy G. Elliott 160 

Jean Wood Preston 159 

Frank R. Stevens 158 

Elizabeth Winship 157 

Claire G. Emerson 157 

Virginia L. Senders 156 

John R. Ehrenfeld 154 

Emanuel Maier 153 

Roger S. Walen 152 

Howard W. Stoudt 150 

Thomas D. Ward 150 

Irving Telling 148 

Albert C. England 147 

Merrylees K. Turner 147 

Nancy E. Hall 146 

Allen R. Dougherty 140 

Edward G. Chisholm 139 

Charles Ferguson 137 

Eleanor A. Brennan 134 

Helen M. Dougherty 134 

Robert M. Malloy, Sr. 134 

Paul Travers 133 

Harold Rosenwald 132 

Armand F. Ferro 131 

Robert D. Gordon 130 

E. Donlan Rooney 129 

Gail Duane 116 

Patricia Morse 113 

Polly Jackson 108 

Paul Fox 18 

Barbara O'Brien 2 

Stephen Braude 2 

John Niles 1 

John D. Adams 1 

Fred Jacob 1 

REPUBLICAN 



Presidential Preference John A. Volpe 67 

Nelson Rockefeller 213 

Richard M. Nixon 110 

Eugene J. McCarthy 59 



32 









Presidential Preference 
(Continued) 



Delegates, Group 1 
(3rd District) 



Ronald Reagan 
Robert F. Kennedy 
Scattering 
B lanks 



Frederic C. Dumaine, Jr 
Lise J. Neunherz 



7 

2 

9 

41 



194 
147 



Alternate Delegates 



Ernest McKenzie, Jr. 
George E. O'Rourke 



158 
174 



Delegates, Group 2 



Monte G. Basbas 
Alexander Ellis, Jr 



191 

223 



Alternate Delegates 



Edward M. Dickson 
Margaret B. Hunter 



241 
189 



Delegates Not Grouped 



G. Ronald Kesinger 



30 



State Committee Man 

(5th Middlesex District) 



State Committee Woman 

(5th Middlesex District) 



G. Sherman Blair, Jr. 


387 


John J. Walker 


30 


Sybil Danforth 


213 


Elena F. Chaffee 


185 



Republican Town Committee 



(One slate) 



Helen K. Swans on 
Robert L. Moore 
Jacqueline D. Clement 
Gardner Jackson, Jr. 
Sareen R. Gerson 
Virginia G. Spangle 
John C. Haartz, Jr. 
John R. Caswell 
J. Lewis Cunningham 
Edith M. Henderson 
Gwendolyn G. desCognets 
Anthony Faunce 
James DeNormandie 
Guido R. Perera 



33 



Republican Town Committee 

(Continued) Helen H. Greene 

Kenneth W. Bergen 
Elizabeth S. Peavey 
Daniel A. Spaeth 
Ellen F. Meriam 
C. Robert Armstrong 
Warren R. Dwyer 
William D. Rodrick 
Elizabeth C. Donaldson 
Dick J. Wollmar 
Laura Thiessen 
Sally L. Jackson 
Margot A. Lindsay 
G. Gordon Gatchell, Jr. 
Richard C. Fleck 



34 






SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
May 27, 1968 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to 
order at 7:45 P. M. by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen. A 
quorum being present, the following business was transacted: 

Article 1 . To determine whether the Town will authorize 
the Selectmen to effect a settlement of the petition for damages 
brought by John F. DiPerna, et als, against the Town in the Mid- 
dlesex Superior Court (#270977) as a result of the eminent domain 
taking for conservation and recreation purposes of the DiPerna 
land on the northeasterly side of the Concord Turnpike by the 
Town in 1964, to determine whether the Town will appropriate a 
sum of money to effect such a settlement with the petitioners, 
and to determine whether such sum shall be transferred from avail- 
able funds, raised by taxation, or by a combination of the two. 

VOTED : That the sum of $23,500 be appropriated from 
free cash and that the Selectmen be and they hereby are authorized 
to pay said sum to John F. DiPerna, et als, Petitioners, to effect 
a full settlement of all claims of the Petitioners in the law suit 
now pending in the Middlesex Superior Court of John F. DiPerna, 
et als, against the Town of Lincoln. (#270977) 

Article 2 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
continue to support the School Committee in its expanding plan to 
bring additional children to the Lincoln Schools under the Metco 
program, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town support the School Committee in 
its plan to expand the participation of the Lincoln Schools in the 
Metco program. 

Article 3 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
make the following transfer in the Water Department budget: $6180 
from account #950 to account #951, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED : That the sum of $6180 be transferred from the 
Water Department budget account #950 to account #951. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:10 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



35 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 17, 1968 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared 
open at 7 o'clock A. M. by Mr . Richard J. Eaton, Warden, who was 
assisted throughout the day by Mr. John Garrison and Mr. D. Everett 
Sherman, Jr. The Polls were declared closed at 7 P. M. by Mr. 
Sherman. The total number of votes cast were as follows: Re- 
publican - 526; Democratic - 464. 



Republican 



Congressman (3rd District) 



Laurence Curtis 
Malcolm E. Peabody, Jr 
Chandler H. Stevens 
Thomas B . Adams 
Blanks 



177 

335 

3 

1 
10 



Councillor (3rd District) 



Frank D. Walker 
Blanks 



422 
104 



Senator (5th Middlesex Dist.) James DeNormandie 

Paul W. Giunta 
B lanks 



477 

1 

48 



Representative in General 
Court (26th Middlesex Dist.) 



Edward M. Dickson 
C. Robert Armstrong 
Anne Priest 
B lanks 



248 

259 

1 

18 



County Commissioners (2) 



Sheriff, Middlesex County 



Congressman (3rd District) 



Scattering 


27 


Blanks 


499 


Scattering 


32 


Blanks 


494 


Democratic 




Philip J. Philbin 


20 


Thomas B . Adams 


231 


Joseph G. Bradley 


203 


Joseph G. Dever 


6 


B lanks 


4 



36 



Councillor (3rd District) 



George F 
Blanks 



Cronin, Jr 



233 
231 



Senator (5th Middlesex Dist.) 



W. Seymour Archibald, Jr. 345 

John J. Carver 22 

Stephen F. Coyle 20 

Paul W. Giunta 27 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 49 



Representative in General 
Court (26th Middlesex Dist.) 



Anne P 
Blanks 



Priest 



398 
66 



County Commissioners (2) 



Frederick J. Connors 
John F. Dever, Jr. 
William J. Buckley 
Blanks 



103 
108 
274 
443 



Sheriff, Middlesex County 



Howard W. Fitzpatrick 
Charles J. Biondo 
Scattering 
B lanks 



144 

144 

1 

175 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
November 4, 1968 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, at 7:43 P. M. A 
quorum being present, the following business was transacted: 



Article 1 



To determine whether the Town will vote to 



appropriate the sum of $9,500.00, or any other sum, for emergency 
repairs and changes to the heating system at the Fire and Police 
Station, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of $9,500.00 
for emergency repairs and changes to the heating system at the Fire 
and Police Station, said sum to be taken from Free Cash. 

The meeting was adjourned at 8:05 P. M. 



37 



STATE AND NATIONAL ELECTION 
November 5, 1968 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared 
open at 7 o'clock A. M. by Mr. John Garrison, Warden, who was 
assisted during the day by Mr. Richard J. Eaton and Mr. D. Everett 
Sherman, Jr. The Polls were declared closed at 8 o'clock P.M. 
by Mr. Garrison. The total number of votes cast was 2328, of 
which 28 were for partial ballots only. The results were as fol- 
lows: 

Electors of President 
and Vice President 

Blomen and Taylor Socialist Labor 5 

Humphrey and Muskie Democratic 1,144 

Munn and Fisher Prohibition 1 

Nixon and Agnew Republican 1,112 

Wallace and Griffin Independent 39 

Scattering 4 

Blanks 23 

Congressman (3rd District ) 

Philip J. Philbin Democratic 232 

Laurence Curtis Republican 600 

Chandler H. Stevens Independent 1,425 

Blanks 43 

Councillor (3rd District ) 

George F. Cronin, Jr. Democratic 579 

Frank D. Walker Republican 1,451 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 269 

Senator (5th Middlesex District ) 

James DeNormandie Republican 1,942 

Paul W. Giunta Democratic 306 

Blanks 52 



38 



Representative in General Court 
(26th Middlesex District) 

Edward M. Dickson Republican 1,117 

Anne P. Priest Democratic 1,115 

Scattering 3 

Blanks 65 

County Commissioners, Middlesex County 
(2) 

Frederick J. Connors Democratic 1,223 

John F. Dever, Jr. Democratic 1,273 

Scattering 10 

Blanks 2,094 

Sheriff (Middlesex County 

Howard W. Fitzpatrick Democratic 1,398 

Scattering 9 

Blanks 893 

Question No. 1 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Yes 1,864 

No 238 

Blanks 198 

Question No. 2 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Yes 936 

No 1,184 

Blanks 180 

Question No. 3 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Yes 1,604 

No 420 

Blanks 276 

Question No. 4 - Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Yes 1,489 

No 407 

Blanks 404 



39 



Question No. 5 - Liquor Licenses 

A Yes 534 

No 1,598 

Blanks 168 

B Yes 625 

No 1,447 

Blanks 228 

C Yes 718 

No 1,369 

Blanks 213 

D Yes 645 

No 1,381 

Blanks 274 

Question No. 6 - To retain capital punishment 

Yes 964 

No 1,222 

Blanks 114 

Question No. 7 - To continue railroad service 

Yes 2,069 

No 109 

Blanks 122 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



40 



FINANCE 



TOWN TREASURER 

Frederick B. Taylor 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1968 



General 



Water 



Total 



Cash balance 1/1/68 
*Receipts 1968 
Warrant payments 1968 
Transfers 



$ 451,884.14 

4,798,637.94 

4,510,928.65 

+7,018.39 



$ 746,611.82 



$ 9,645.03 

103,376.80 

90,644.89 

-7,018.39 

$ 15,358.55 



$ 461,529.17 
4,902,014.74 
4,601,573.54 



$ 761,970.37 



* For details see 

Accountant's report 

Cash balance 12/31/68: 



In office 
Harvard Trust Co. 
Lexington Trust Co. 
N. E. Merchants Nat'l 

Bank 
First National Bank 
Concord Cooperative Bank 
State Street Bank 

(Swiedler Deposit) 
Belmont Savings Bank 
Beverly Savings Bank 
Boston 5c Savings Bank 
Brookline Savings Bank 
Cambridge Savings Bank 
Charlestown Savings Bank 
Lynn 5c Savings Bank 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 
Newton Savings Bank 
Provident Institution 

for Savings 
Waltham Savings Bank 
Warren Institution 

for Savings 



75,351.02 

515,646.25 

14,487.49 

24,405.49 

708.82 

6,000.00 

5,000.00 
7,302.25 
8,047.67 
7,433.55 
4,133.91 
8,797.12 
9,301.23 
8,304.35 

17,951.79 
8,232.21 

8,439.75 
5,022.16 

12,046.76 



15,358.55 



$ 746,611.82 $ 15,358.55 



$ 75,351.02 

531,004.80 

14,487.49 

24,405.49 

708.82 

6,000.00 

5,000.00 
7,302.25 
8,047.67 
7,433.55 
4,133.91 
8,79 7.12 
9,301.23 
8,304.35 

17,951.79 
8,232.21 

8,439.75 
5,022.16 

12,046.76 
$ 761,970.37 



41 



STABILIZATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1968 $ 35.71 

Interest income in 1968 5,624.99 

Withdrawn from savings banks 

$67,660.70 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, per appropriation 
at March, 1968, Town Meeting: 

For conservation land $30,000.00 

For equipment 12,000.00 

For fire truck 20,000.00 

$62,000.00 

Safe deposit box rent 3.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 5 ,624.99 67 ,627 .99 

Cash balance at December 31, 1968 $ 32.71 



Bank Balances at December 31, 1968 

First National Bank of Boston $ 32.71 

Boston 5c Savings Bank 2,767.57 

Home Savings Bank 8,208.15 

Natick 5C Savings Bank 19,420.78 

Suffolk- Franklin Savings Bank 29,181.52 

Warren Institution for Savings 14,355.00 

Whitman Savings Bank 8,638.65 

$82,604.38 



Earmarked Balances in Fund 

For school purposes $67,460.00 

For equipment 500.00 

Unallocated increment 14 ,644. 38 

$82,604.38 



42 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1968 
Savings bank interest income in 1968 



Bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Cash balance at December 31, 1968 



$ 5.55 
11.09 

$ 16.64 

11.09 

$ 5.55 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1968 



First National Bank of Boston 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 



$ 5.55 
249.65 

$255.20 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 



Julia A. Bemis 
William W. Benjamin 
Marie H. Bisbee 
Mildred E. Bowles 
Agnes L. Brown 
Sarah J. Browning 
Elizabeth G. Chapin 
Robert B. Chapin 
William H. Costello 
Mary H. Cushing 
Anthony J. Doherty 
Paul Dorian 
Charles P. Farnsworth 
Edward R. Farrar 
Francis Flint 
Orila J. Flint 
Donald Gordon 
Raymond E. Haggerty 
George Harrington 
Samuel Hartwell 
Thomas Huddles ton 
Abijah G. Jones 
John J. Kelliher 
Gardner Moore 



$300.00 
500.00 
200.00 
200.00 
300.00 
200.00 
300.00 
300.00 
100.00 
100.00 
500.00 
150.00 
350.00 
300.00 
250.00 
300.00 
300.00 
150.00 
100.00 
300.00 
200.00 
300 . 00 
200.00 
300.00 



u \ 



Lena M. Newell $ 325.00 

Joa Pacewicz 400.00 

John H. Pierce 500.00 

Anne D. Pollard 300.00 

Charles 0. Preble 100.00 

Annie A. Ray 300.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

E. H. Rogers 250.00 

Mary James Scripture 500.00 

Eugene Sherman 200.00 

Charles S. Smith 300.00 

J. Waldo Smith 300.00 

Webster Smith 300.00 

Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 

George G. Tarbell 400.00 

Laura B. and Arthur E. Thiessen 500.00 

Maria L. Thompson 500.00 

Mabel H. Todd 200.00 

Ellen T. Trask 200.00 

Albert Washburn 500.00 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 

Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 

Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 

$14,812.27 



Perpetual Care Fund income accumulated at 

January 1, 1968 $ 6,177.46 

Income received in 1968 948.65 

$ 7,126.11 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, per Cemetery 

Commissioners, for maintenance of lots 500.00 

Accumulated Perpetual Care Fund income 

at December 31, 1968 $ 6,626.11 



44 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 



$ 36,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each December 1, 

1969-1971, issued under Chapter 356, Acts of 1951. 

12,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each December 1, 
1969-19 71, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 

180,000 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000 each October 1, 
1969-1977, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

20,000 School Construction Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each October 1, 
1969-1972, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 

110,000 School Project Loan, 3.70%, due $10,000 each November 1, 
1969-1979, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

510,000 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $40,000 each November 15, 
1969-1972, and $35,000 each November 15, 1973-1982, issued 
under the Acts of 1948. 

70,000 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000 each November 15, 
1969-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948. 



138,000 Total School Loans 

45,000 Fire and Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each October 
1, 1969-1977, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 

10,000 Library Addition Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 each August 1, 
1969-19 70, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 

70,000 Conservation Land Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000 each March 1, 
1969-1982, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 

65,000 Conservation Land Loan, 3.50%, due November 1, 1969, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws. 

90,000 Conservation Land Loan, 4.10%, due $10,000 each November 1, 
1969-1977, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 



$ 1,218,000 Net Debt 

55,000 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $10,000 each August 1, 1969-1972, 
and $8,000 August 1, 1973, and $7,000 August 1, 1974, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 

1,000 Water Mains Loan, 2.80%, due December 1, 1969, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws. 

50,000 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $5,000 each August 15, 1969-1978, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 

45 



$ 40,000 Water Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000 each May 1, 1969-19 76 

issued under Chapter 44, General Laws. 



$ 1,364,000 Total debt at December 31, 1968 



SCHEDULE OF DEBT MATURITIES 



(000) omitted) 











Fire & 


Land 










Debt 








Police 


Conser- 










Maturing in 


School 


Lib 


trary 


Bldg. 


vation 


Water 


Total 


1969 


$ 96 


$ 


5 


$ 5 


$ 


80 


$ 


21 


$ 


207 


1970 


96 




5 


5 




15 




20 




141 


1971 


96 






5 




15 




20 




136 


1972 


80 






5 




15 




20 




120 


1973 


70 






5 




15 




18 




108 


1974 


70 






5 




15 




17 




107 


1975 


70 






5 




15 




10 




100 


1976 


70 






5 




15 




10 




100 


1977 


70 






5 




15 




5 




95 


1978 


50 










5 




5 




60 


1979 


50 










5 








55 


1980 


40 










5 








45 


1981 


40 










5 








45 


1982 


40 










5 








45 



$938 $10 $45 $225 $146 $1,364 



Note: This schedule does not include Lincoln's share of the debt 
of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District, nor does 
it reflect the amounts receivable from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under the School Building Assistance program 
and from the Commonwealth and/or the Federal Government for 
land conservation grants. 



46 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Lois McClure Light 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



Real and Personal 

Valuation 1966 less abatements 
Valuation 1967 less abatements 
Valuation 1968 less abatements 

Motor Vehicle 

Valuation 1966 less abatements 
Valuation 1967 less abatements 
Valuation 1968 less abatements 

Net Valuation 

Average Net Valuation 

5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 



$37,462,604.00 
39,875,394.00 
41,137,510.00 



2,180,281.00 
3,143,682.00 
2,862,718.00 

126,662,189.00 

42,220,730.00 

2,111,037.00 



FUNDED DEBT 



General 

Inside Limit 
Outside Limit 

Enterprise, Water 

Total Funded Debt, January 1, 1969 

Available Borrowing Capacity, January 1, 1969 



312,000.00 
906,000.00 

146,000.00 

1,364,000.00 

1,799,037.00 



47 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Current Year 
Personal Tax 
Real Estate Tax 



$ 85,923.38 
1,427,875.04 



$1,513,798.42 



Prior Years 
Personal Tax 
Real Estate Tax 



436.79 
9,623.48 



10,060.27 



From the State 

Old Age Assistance 
Old Age Assistance Adm. 
Medical Assistance 
Medical Assistance Adm. 
Tuition & Transportation 

of children 
Aid to Libraries 
Loss of taxes 
Valuation Basis 
Abatements to Veterans 
Special Education Program, 

Chapters 69 & 71 
Special Aid, Chapter 70 
Meals tax 



1,641.02 
263.68 

3,736.27 
432.58 

615.50 

1,403.25 

13,075.11 

142,192.30 

986.25 

4,122.00 

94,263.23 

846.12 



263,577.31 



City of Cambridge in lieu 
of taxes 



608.66 



Permits 
Building 
Plumbing 
Wiring 



1,355.70 
641.75 
857.90 



2,855.35 



Fines 
Court 



425.00 



Grants & Gifts 

School Construction 
School Transportation 



26,992.64 
41,009.57 



68,002.21 



48 



From Federal Grants 
Old Age Assistance 
Old Age Assistance Adm. 
Medical Aid to the Aged 
Medical Aid to the Aged Adm, 



1,908.40 
232.86 

6,579.51 
431.11 



9,151.88 



School Aid, Chapter 864 
School Aid, Chapter 874 
Title I Project 8-157-192 
Title I 9-157-141 ESEA 
Title VI Project 8-157-013 
Air Force School 
Chapter 506, Metco 



183.00 
17,326.00 
3,000.00 
2,400.00 
5,329.00 
883,414.49 
9,832.00 



921,484.49 



From County 
Dog Licenses 



748.38 



Privileges 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

1964 

1965 

1966 

1967 

1968 
Farm Animal Excise 



92.40 

108.90 

35.48 

9,377.43 

155,111.22 

33.50 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 
Planning Board 
Collector of Taxes 
Town Clerk 
Board of Appeals 
Town Hall Rental 
Survey of Land 



358.94 
100.00 
739.00 
8.00 
140.00 
113.00 
100.00 





PROTECTION 


OF 


PERSONS 


AND 


PROPERTY 


olice 














Pistol 


Permits 








125 


.50 


Insurance Reports 








327 


.50 


I. D. Firearms 








390 


.00 


Regional School Attendance 


Officer 




150 


.00 



164,758.93 



1,558.94 



993.00 



49 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Dog Inoculations 
Garbage Collection 
Licenses 
Disposal Permits 



$ 253.50 

12,460.89 

18.00 

10.00 



$ 12,742.39 



HIGHWAYS 



Chapter 90 Maintenance 

State Aid 

County Aid 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Snow Removal 
Sanitary Fill 
Rental Equipment 
Pipe Line 
Miscellaneous 



3,000.00 
2,250.00 

1,404.02 
240.00 

20.00 
300.00 

27.50 



7,241.52 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



Refunds and Reimbursements 



18,891.97 



SCHOOLS 



Tuition 

Metco 

Rentals of Classrooms by 

Air Force School 
Milk Fund 

Air Force School Cafeteria 
Rentals 
Miscellaneous 



2,927.40 
10,136.00 

6,000.00 

7,905.45 

30,538.97 

70.00 

745.70 



58,323.52 



LIBRARY 



Library Fines 



2,622.63 



50 



UNCLASSIFIED 

DeCordova Reimbursement 

for State Audit $ 350.00 

Insurance Refunds & Settlements 5,456.21 

Air Force School Reimbursement 8,841.74 

Tailings 8.25 

Bankruptcy 589.84 



RECREATION 

Ski Instruction 14.00 

Golf Instruction 248.00 

Playground 3, 442.42 



CEMETERIES 

Interments 700.00 

Foundations 85.00 



INTEREST 

Interest on Taxes 840.39 

Interest on Deposits 5,029.08 
Interest on Investments 1,152.56 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENTS 

Conservation Fund 10,000.00 

Conservation Receipts Reserved 93,917.50 

Dog Licenses 1,460.75 

Grammar School Fund 54.91 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund 1,017.74 

Deputy Collector 401.16 

Non- Revenue Investment 449,070.78 

Cemetery Improvement Fund 3,282.50 

Cemetery Fund 500.00 

Donald Gordon Fund 500.00 

Library Fund - Books 400.00 

Celebrations Committee 250.00 

Stabilization Fund 62,000.00 



51 



15,246.04 



3,704.42 



785.00 



7,022.03 



622,855.34 



Refunds and Cancellations 



Employee Deductions 
Mass. Payment of Services 
Anticipation of Revenue Loans 
Serial Loans 
Conservation Land Loan 

Anti Serial 
Premium on Land Loan 



TOTAL GENERAL RECEIPTS 

CASH BALANCE, JANUARY 1, 1968 



REFUNDS 



LOANS 



375,198.86 

216.91 

400,000.00 

155,000.00 

155,000.00 
180.00 



WATER REVENUE 



Water Rates 
Water Connections 
Miscellaneous 
Rent of Hydrants 
Reimbursement 

TOTAL WATER REVENUE 

CASH BALANCE, JANUARY 1, 1968 



71,390.80 
16,900.00 

136.00 
14,950.00 

423.70 



$ 5,175.25 



1,085,595.77 



$4,798,228.72 



451,884.14 



$5,250,112.86 



$ 103,800.50 



9,645.03 



$ 113,445.53 



52 



EXPENDITURES 
Payments on Selectmen's Warrants 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 

Executive Secretary 

Finance Committee 

Town Office 

Town Accountant 

Treasurer & Collector 

Assessors 

Legal 

Town Clerk 

Election and Registration 

Street Lists & Expense 

Planning Board 

Board of Appeals 

Conservation Commission 

Consulting & Engineering 

Town Hall 



1,261.22 

13,773.65 

20.00 

25,852.24 

6,119.27 

2,895.99 

2,169.04 

6,762.73 

1,230.00 

907.00 

1,134.15 

5,630.00 

111.06 

5,987.80 

5,625.99 

8,673.93 



88,154.07 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police 
Fire 

Communications 
Civil Defense 
Fire & Police Building 
Inspectors of Buildings 
Fire & Police Building, 
Special Article #1 



77,969.21 

58,696.65 

19,672.80 

242.30 

4,046.77 

4,071.60 

4,054.32 



168,753.65 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Salaries 
Expense 

Inspection Service 
Garbage Collection 



6,070.67 

3,935.81 

966.73 

8,348.92 



19,322.13 



53 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Public Works General 
Public Works Building 
Concord Road Repairs 
Bicycle Path 
Highway Equipment, 

Special Article #19 
Highway Building, 

Special Article #23 
Sanitary Fill, 

Special Article 
Chapter 90 Maintenance 



140,728.94 

2,860.00 

119.70 

8,561.87 

7,611.29 

10.50 

481.49 
9,000.00 



$ 169,373.79 



CHARITIES 



Aid to Citizens 
Adminis tration 
Veterans' Services 



17,239.46 
2,114.46 
1,668.11 



21,022.03 



EDUCATION 



Elementary School 

Regional High School 

Chapter 864 

Chapter 874 

Title I Co-op. Research 

Title I Project 8-157-192 

Title VI Project 8-157-013 

Metco, Chapter 506 

Air Force School 

School Building Committee 



LIBRARY 



908,770.97 
383,628.83 



726.71 

3,000.00 

5,257.50 

5,799.65 

692,232.12 

108.56 



Library 41,654.78 

Library Building 6,431.73 
Library Renovation, 

Special Article #22 14,039.25 

Library Study & Preliminary Plans 2,000.00 



1,999,524.34 



64,125.76 



54 



RECREATION 

Salaries $ 6,268.20 

Expense 1,683.44 



CEMETERIES 

Cemeteries 3,994.01 

Cemetery Improvement 1,005. 79 



TOWN DEBT SERVICE 

Bond Payments 130,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 37,507.83 

Interest on Tax Anticipation Notes 6,200.01 

Conservation Loan 155,000.00 

Interest on Loan 113.67 

Premium on Loan 109.90 



7,951.64 



4,999.80 



328,931.41 



REFUNDS 

Refunds 9,023.62 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 25,748.00 

Employee Insurance & Hospital Fund 18,139.24 

Property & Indemnity Insurance 18,668.05 

Dump Rent & Maintenance 1,000.00 

Town Reports 2,880.27 

Celebrations Committee 2,132.78 

Purchase of Dean Land 27,000.00 

Purchase of Banks & Pertzoff Land 160,000.00 

DiPerna Land Settlement 23,500.00 

Damages, South Great Road 2,120.93 

Mosquito Control Study 12.00 

Tailings - Unclaimed Checks 16.50 

281,217.77 



55 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENTS 



Non- Revenue Cash Investment 

Dog Licenses : Due County 

Milk Fund 

Hanscom School Cafeteria 

State Audit 

County Hospital Assessment 

County Tax 

Motor Vehicle Bills 

M. A. P. C. 

M. B. T. A. 

State Parks and Reservations 

Donald Gordon Recreation Fund 

Deputy Collection Fees 

Repayment of Temporary Loan 

Cemetery Improvement Fund 



Employee Deductions 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

CASH BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 1968 



449,070.78 

1,348.25 

8,319.32 

29,344.50 

3,009.11 

1,554.36 

57,177.09 

546.75 

210.30 

8,966.11 

4,957.26 

500.00 

401.16 

400,000.00 

436.50 



$ 965,841.49 
375,259.54 

$5,203,501.04 
746,611.82 

$5,250,112.86 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Salaries and Wages 

General Expense 

Development of Well Fields 

Bonds 

Interest 

Refunds 

Water Surplus - Salary & Wages 

TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT EXPENSE 

CASH BALANCE, December 31, 1968 



19,641.04 
42,240.93 

3,167.31 
26,000.00 

5,356.00 
106.70 

1,575.00 



$ 98,086.98 
15,358.55 



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70 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1968 

General Accounts 
ASSETS 



Cash 

General 

Water 

Petty Cash Advances 

Accounts Receivable 
Taxes 

Levy of 1966 

Real 
Levy of 1967 

Personal 

Real 
Levy of 1968 

Personal 

Real 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 
Levy of 1965 
Levy of 1966 
Levy of 1967 
Levy of 1968 

Board of Health 

Garbage Collections 

Water Rates 



7.40 
854.70 



273.75 
10,895.41 



52.80 

92.40 

261.95 

4,391.03 



$ 746,611.82 
15,358.55 

95.00 



742.00 



862.10 



11,169.16 



4,798.18 

328.52 
917.40 



Aid to Highways 
State 
County 

Unprovided for or 
overdrawn Accounts 

State Assessments, 1968 

Recreation Areas 

M. B. T. A. 

School Milk Program 

County Dog Fund 

Overlay, 1966 

Overlay, 1967 

Overlay, 1968 

TOTAL 



11,240.34 
5,620.17 



654.04 

.25 

97.52 

51.62 

336.00 

658.60 

3,365.43 



16,860.51 



5 


163 


46 


802 


,906 


70 





71 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVE 

Agency 

Dog Licenses due County $ 138.75 

Trust Fund Income 

Julian DeCordova School Equipment Fund 1,017.74 

Grammar School Fund 54.91 1,072.65 

Recoveries 

Old Age Assistance 17,189.57 

Medical Assistance 581.10 17,770.67 

Premium on Loans 279.35 

Interest on Loans 109.67 

Federal Grants 



Disability Assistance Adm 






80.05 






Aid to Dependent Cri 


ildi 


ren 


Adm. 




14.58 






Old Age Assistance 


Adm 








89.76 






Medical Assistance 


Adm 








59.64 






Medical Assistance 










772.72 


1,016 


75 


School 
















Title I 8-157-013 










71.50 






Title I 9-157-141 








2 


,400.00 






Metco, Chapter 506 








4 


032.35 






P. L. 864 










183.00 






P. L. 874 








17 


,326.00 






Operation of Schoo! 


at 


Air Force Base 


268 


,285.60 


292,298 


45 


Conservation 












10,000 


00 



Revolving Funds 

Air Force Base Cafeteria 2,837.04 

Appropriation Balances 
Revenue 

General 180,866.45 

Guarantee-Deposits 

Planning Board 5,000.00 

Tailings Unclaimed Checks 184.85 

Overestimate 1968 Assessment 

County Tax 2,722.16 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation 
State 

Aid to Libraries 1,403.25 

Conservation 105,630.00 

Cemetery Improvements 21,842.69 

Sanitary Fill 240.00 129,115.94 



72 



Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 



4,105.60 



Revenue reserved until collected 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Departmental 
Aid to Highways 
Water 

Reserved for Petty Cash Advances 



4,798.18 

328.52 

16,860.51 

917.40 



22,904.61 
95.00 



Surplus Revenue 
General 
Water 



117,030.21 
15,358.55 



132,388.76 



TOTAL 



802,906.70 



73 





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75 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Frank R. Stevens 

Robert L. Sutherland 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 



The tax rate for 1968 was $37.50 per thousand dollars of valuation. 
This was an increase of $0.50 over the previous year. The appropriations 
raised for 1968 increased $148,000 from the prior year which could have 
resulted in a $3.50 increase in the tax rate. However, $70,000 was 

available from free cash and other funds, $46,000 from additional taxable 
real estate and personal property, and $11,500 net from other items. The 
balance of $20,500 was raised by increasing the tax rate by $0.50. It 
is anticipated that the increase in the tax rate during 1969 will be con- 
siderably higher than during 1968 primarily because of increased expendi- 
tures for schools and other items, combined with a decrease in revenue 
received from the state. One of the major reasons for the anticipated 
decrease in revenue from the state arises from the fact that welfare ex- 
penditures, which have increased rapidly in recent years, are now paid 
by the state and charged against the local aid fund, rather than being 
paid by the individual cities and towns. 

The continued use of a professional firm to observe and measure all 
new structures in Town enabled the Board to determine the tax rate early 
in the year in an efficient and economical manner. 

For the benefit of the newer tax payers who have become a part of our 
community, and to provide a ready reference for our older ones, we list 
below some of the more general regulations dealing with excise and real 
estate taxes as they are applicable in the Town. 

1. The status of property on January 1st is the 
determinant of the tax in any year. 

2. All real estate and personal property tax abate- 
ment requests must be filed with the Board by 
October 1st of the year in question. 

3. Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement 
requests must be filed with the Board before 
July 1 of the year succeeding the year in 
question. If you change cars during the year, 
the burden is on you to file the abatement 
request. 

4. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41 of the General Laws, 
as amended, provides for certain exemptions for tax- 
payers over the age of 70, who meet certain require- 
ments of income, residence, etc. Additional in- 
formation may be obtained from the Assessors' Office. 



76 



5. Veterans with 10% of more disability, holders of the 

Purple Heart awards, and others, may qualify for a 
tax exemption. Please contact the Board to see if 
you qualify. 

1968 Recapitulation 

Total Appropriations to be raised from Taxation $2,013,413.84 
Total Appropriations to be taken from 

Available Funds 334,607.92 

State Parks & Reservations 4,303.22 
State Parks & Reservations, 

Underestimate 1967 1,089.30 

State Audit of Municipal Accounts 3,009.11 

MBTA 8,965.86 

MBTA, Underestimate 1967 78.71 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 546.75 

MAPC 210.30 

County Tax 59,899.25 

County Hospital 1,554.36 

Offsets to Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 5,286.33 

1967 Overlay Deficit 2,230.35 

Overlay of Current Year 18,314.56 

Gross Amount to be raised $2,453,509.86 



Estimated Receipts and Available Funds : 

Estimated Receipts from Local Aid and 

Agency Funds $ 361,877.59 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 166,800.00 

General Government 3,690.00 

Health & Sanitation 4,819.00 

Schools 15,095.00 

Libraries 2,236.00 

Recreation 2,573.00 

Cemeteries 1,049.00 

Interest 11,018.00 

All Other 2,603.00 

Overestimate, 1967 County Tax 3,671.73 

Appropriations voted to be taken from 
Available Funds 



Total, Estimated Receipts & Available Funds 910,040.24 

Net Amount to be raised by Taxation 1,543,469.62 



$2,453,509.86 



77 



Total Valuation: 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 



$ 2,302,090 at $37.50 



86,328.37 



38,857,100 at $37.50 
$41,159,190 $1,543,469.62 



Number of Acres of Land Assessed 
Number of Dwelling Houses Assessed 
Tax Rate per thousand: 

School Rate $22.70 

General Rate 14.80 



6,988.45 
1,182 



$37.50 



78 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENTS 
Leo J. Algeo, Chief 



I hereby submit my report for the Fire and Police Departments 
for the year ending December 31, 1968. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



The department answered a total of 435 calls as listed below 



Building 

Chimney 

Brush and Woods 


9 

6 

60 


Electric wires down 




or arcing 


26 


Motor Vehicle fires 


9 


Motor Vehicle accidents 


103 


Flooded basements 


70 


Aircraft crash 


1 


Mutual Aid 


3 


Miscellaneous 


148 




435 



The building fires consisted of 1 house, 1 house and restau- 
rant combination, 1 garage and 1 garage and barn combination. 
The total estimated loss in these fires was $118,500.00. 

The Fire Department inspected and issued permits for the fol- 
lowing installations during 1968: 

Oil tanks, outside 10 

Oil tanks , inside 2 

Oil burners _21 

33 

16 permits were issued for blasting. 



79 



809 permits were issued for outside burning. 

The nursing homes were inspected every 3 months, fire drills 
conducted and fire alarm systems tested. 

Fire drills were conducted at all Lincoln Schools, the Nur- 
sery Schools, and at the Hanscom School, in cooperation with the 
Hans com Field Fire Department. 

We now have 20 street fire alarm boxes, the latest being at 
the Smith School. These boxes are inspected and tested monthly. 

In February Firefighter James Casella was promoted to Cap- 
tain. Captain Casella continues to make all inspections re- 
quired by the Fire Department and issues related permits. He 
maintains the fire alarm system and is conducting a program of 
home fire inspections. 

In April Captain Casella instructed a class in firefighting 
at Battalion Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 241st Artillery, Natick, 

Mass . 

In October Captain Casella attended a Fire Communications In- 
stitute at The North Shore Community College. 

The Lincoln Fire Department has enjoyed an enviable record 
so far as fire losses are concerned. However, in February, in 
10 degree weather, Lincoln suffered one of its most severe losses 
ever when the Hartwell Farm burned. Lincoln firemen, with help 
from Concord, Lexington, Weston and Hanscom Field, fought valiant- 
ly in the severe cold but were unable to save the landmark. 

During the flooding conditions experienced in March the de- 
partment pumped out 47 cellars, some of them 2 and 3 times. 

The Fire Department is indebted to Mrs. Dorothy Gray, Lincoln 
Road, for permitting us to use the old Crowley house for our 
spring drills. Under the direction of the department officers, 
Deputy Chiefs Bill Dean, Bill Doherty , Tom Coan and Captain Cas- 
ella, smoke and fire conditions were created in the old house and 
the men were given instructions in the use of fire fighting equip- 
ment. Four such drills were conducted at the Crowley house. 

During 1968 six new men were enlisted in the department. 
They are: Arthur Cotoni, Thomas Norton, Allen Bowles, Alan Donald- 



80 



son, Chris Warner and Don Martini, who has since enlisted in the 
U. S. Air Force. Steven Ziegler returned to the department after 
4 years in the U. S. Air Force. 

Firefighter Joseph Bozak and Callmen Thomas Norton, Steven 
Ziegler and Don Martini attended courses on Firefighting and Fire 
Service at the Central Massachusetts Fire Training Academy in 
Framingham. 

Captain Casella notes that in making home inspections the 
most common hazards he finds are oil leaks around oil burners, 
electrical extension wires under rugs or wrapped about water and 
steam pipes, and overloaded cellars and attics. He also reports 
that few home owners have given any thought to an escape plan in 
case of fire. We ask you to please consider these points. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Arrests by Lincoln Police 18 

Arrests by State Police 16 

Violations of Motor Vehicle Law 

recorded 500 

Warnings issued 194 

Court Summonses issued 306 

Total fines paid $3,740.00 

Motor Vehicle Accident report: 

Accidents reported 279 

Occupants injured 209 

Occupants killed 2 

Following is a partial list of other activities of the Police 
Department: 

Burglaries investigated 47 

Larcenies investigated 18 

Estimated loss $61,282.00 

Value of property recovered $44,415.00 

Appearances in Court 176 



81 



Emergency calls other than 

motor vehicle accidents 101 

Checks made at vacant houses 6,083 

Checks made of business places 11,545 
Summonses served for other 

Police Departments 251 

Dog complaints investigated 218 
Motor Vehicle registration numbers 

checked for ownership or 

stolen record 1,317 

Permits to carry firearms issued 60 

License to sell firearms issued 1 

Permit for air rifle issued 1 
Identification Cards for owners 

of firearms issued 241 

Miscellaneous items recorded 4,401 

The "housebreak" situation continues to be serious. We 
are reporting a marked increase in the number of breaks in 1968. 
We have had some success in solving a few of these breaks but our 
main objective must be "prevention" of such breaks. It is to 
this end that we solicit the continued help of the citizenry of 
Lincoln. Please do not hesitate to call when anything in your 
neighborhood arouses your suspicions. 

Raymond J. Maher was appointed to the department on Feb. 13, 
1968, to replace Patrolman Walter R. Carew, who resigned January 
31. David A. Davis was appointed on February 26 in anticipa- 
tion of Patrolman Lawrence Hallett's retirement in September. 
John J. Fitzgerald was added to the department on April 15, as a 
result of Town Meeting action. Patrolman Maher was graduated 
from a 6-week course at the Newton Police Academy on June 14, 
1968. Arrangements are now being made for the other two men 
to attend similar courses in the near future. 

Beginning on Wednesday, February 14, and for five successive 
Wednesday nights, a refresher course was conducted for Regular 
and Special Officers at the Lincoln station. Captain Paul Fur- 
don of the Lexington Police conducted this course for us. 

Sgt. Michael McHugh, Patrolman Charles Doyle and Patrolman 
Raymond Maher are continuing their studies in the Law Enforcement 
program at Northeastern University. 

Both the Fire and Police Departments urge all homeowners to 



82 



post your name in some manner at the edge of the road so that we 
may more easily find you in the event of an emergency. 

Two retirements during the past year at the Fire-Police Sta- 
tion are worthy of comment. Having reached compulsory retire- 
ment age in September, "Larry" Hallett was forced to retire. We 
wish him a hearty "Well done", and happiness to him and his charm- 
ing wife "Beth". The second retirement came at the end of the 
year when "Bill" Davis left us. We shall miss "Bill" and his 
kind words of encouragement and his keen wit. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr., Director 



During 1968 all five presently available buildings in town 
qualifying as fall-out shelters were marked and stocked with emer- 
gency supplies. My thanks to Public Works Administrator Frank 
Cande and his men, without whose help the job of moving the sup- 
plies would have been monumental. 

In July the Bureau of the Census , acting for the Federal 
Office of Civil Defense, conducted a survey to determine the de- 
gree of protection offered by basements of the houses in the Town, 
As a result of this survey, householders have been informed of 
the protection factor of their basements, and have been given sug- 
gestions as to how it may be improved. I am sure that there 
were gaps in the coverage of the Town, and I should be glad to 
hear from anyone whose home was not surveyed. 

During the course of the survey, it became apparent that 
there is a good deal of misunderstanding of what is meant by 
"fallout shelter". The danger of death from blast or fire 
caused by a nuclear detonation ends twenty miles or so from 
ground zero; the danger of death from radioactive fallout exists 
many hundreds of miles from the area of such a detonation. It 
is shelter from the latter that we are concerned with. 



83 



A year ago, the possibility was mentioned of the desirability 
of providing emergency power to some buildings, in order that they 
might be used to give temporary shelter in such a situation as a 
tornado, or a widespread power failure. This year, the Concord 
Chapter of the American Red Cross set up a committee to coordin- 
ate the efforts of the various towns along these lines. Mr. Hen- 
ry Warner consented to represent Lincoln on this committee; with 
him I considered various buildings which might be utilized. We 
decided that the best plan would be to run a cable from the emer- 
gency generator at the Town Hall to the Stone Church, thus making 
both buildings usable if electricity was cut off for a long per- 
iod. The Prudential Committee of the First Parish gave per- 
mission to use the Parish House for this purpose, and I am asking 
for funds to accomplish the work. When it is completed we 
should be able to offer heat, cooking facilities and light for 
up to about a hundred people. 

Cuts in the Federal Budget for Civil Defense made it impos- 
sible for us to install the tank and fittings necessary if we are 
to provide the two weeks' supply of fuel for the generator at 
the Fire & Police Station which we are required to have; we hope, 
however, that we can accomplish this in 1969. 

The Federal Government approved the Town's Program Paper for 
fiscal 1969, making us eligible for matching funds, and for the 
purchase of surplus equipment. 



84 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Abigail Avery 

Herbert Haessler, M. D. 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D. , Chairman 



On July 1, after several months of study and consultation, 
the Board published a revised edition of its "Health Regulations 
and Facilities". This 15-page pamphlet replaces an edition of 
12 years ago, and is a refinement of some of the basic State 
Health Laws, and a restatement of certain specific regulations 
peculiar to the Town of Lincoln. In this issue, new families in 
Town will find a guide to the Health Facilities available; and 
those interested in construction or disposal plant alterations 
particularly will find advice as to regulations. Copies of this 
pamphlet are available at the Town House. 

The firm of Cleverdon, Varney & Pike has been retained as 
the Board's consultant in matters of drainage and sewage disposal. 
In general, this service has proven very satisfactory. It has 
been necessary to refuse one building site because of an inade- 
quate leaching area; and in a few other instances variants have 
been allowed. 

A new contract has been signed with the Emerson Hospital Home 
Care Service which provides public health nursing service to the 
Town of Lincoln. This service is described in previous reports, 
and is a development of the State and Federal Medicare-Medicaid 
program. Presently, in addition to complete home nursing care 

coverage, a part-time social worker is available within this ser- 
vice. Lincoln's share of the expense in this 6-town enter